Popular Safety News and Current Events

Popular Safety News and Current Events, Safety News Articles.
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Colorado cannabis workers are happy, but need better safety training
Colorado State University researchers have completed a first-of-its-kind, peer-reviewed study that examines the demographics, physical environment and psychosocial aspects of working in the cannabis trade, which is now legal in some form in over half the United States, including Colorado. The study results were published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. (2018-03-16)

Together for more food safety in Europe and its neighboring countries
Strawberries from Spain, tomatoes from the Netherlands, spices from Morocco and citrus fruits from Georgia -- the globalization of food production and food trading is posing new challenges for consumer health protection. The range of foods is getting bigger and their safety has to be guaranteed in increasingly more complex supply chains. (2017-11-06)

More infants and toddlers being positioned correctly in car safety seats
New research suggests child passenger safety education programs are a success, with more infants and toddlers riding in the rear-facing position than ever before. The study abstract, 'Trends in Child Passenger Safety Practices in Indiana From 2009-2015,' will be presented Monday, Sept. 18 at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago. (2017-09-15)

Many second hand plastic toys could pose a risk to children's health, study suggests
Scientists at the University of Plymouth have discovered high concentrations of hazardous elements including antimony, barium, bromine, cadmium, chromium and lead in many second hand plastic toys. (2018-01-26)

Children who commute to school unaccompanied have greater autonomy and decision-making ability
Results of a UGR research show that children of ages above 10-12 years are more likely to travel to school unaccompanied and in an active way, that is to say, walking or cycling, which give them better safety perceptions and autonomy. (2017-11-27)

MRIs during pregnancy and outcomes for infants, children
In an analysis that included more than 1.4 million births, exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the first trimester of pregnancy compared with nonexposure was not associated with increased risk of harm to the fetus or in early childhood, although gadolinium MRI at any time during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of a broad set of rheumatological, inflammatory, or skin conditions and, possibly, for stillbirth or neonatal death, according to a study appearing in the Sept. 6 issue of JAMA. (2016-09-06)

Pediatric emergency department physicians wary of discussing firearm injury prevention
Many emergency departments provide education on childhood injury prevention. But new research shows many physicians are leaving out one important topic: firearm injury prevention. The study abstract, 'Firearm Safety: A Survey on Practice Patterns, Knowledge and Opinions of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Providers,' will be presented Friday, Sept. 15 at the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago. (2017-09-15)

University of Leicester announces world first forensic technique
A team led by a University of Leicester forensic pathologist is believed to be the first in the world to use a new radiological approach for mass fatality investigation. (2006-02-24)

Mass. public safety, public health agencies collaborate to address the opioid epidemic
A new study shows that public health and public safety agencies established local, collaborative programs in Massachusetts to connect overdose survivors and their personal networks with addiction treatment, harm reduction, and other community support services following a non-fatal overdose. (2018-02-14)

Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-07-25)

Human factors issues in firearms design and training
Firearms, unlike many tools, lack the standardization of design and training that could greatly reduce unintended injury and death. (2006-03-06)

To prevent cyberattacks, agency similar to National Transportation Safety Board suggested
After arguably the worst year ever for cyberattacks and data breaches, Indiana University research suggests it may be time to create an independent cybersecurity agency board comparable in approach to the National Transportation Safety Board that investigates airplane crashes and train derailments. (2018-02-13)

Expert panel reviews neuraminidase inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza
An ECDC expert opinion concludes that there is clear evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Moreover, the current recommendations in European countries on the use of the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir are appropriate and should be applied by prescribing physicians. (2017-08-16)

Dental checklist of bad practice has patient care at its heart
Dental experts have drawn up a definitive list of never events -- scenarios that patients should never face -- in a bid to ensure excellent patient care worldwide. (2018-05-11)

New safety data for the most commonly used drug to treat Chagas disease
The frequency of adverse reactions to benznidazole is high when treating chronic Chagas patients, although they were mostly mild effects, according to a study led by ISGlobal, in collaboration with the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. The results point to the need of finding drug combinations or dosages in order to maintain efficacy but decrease its toxicity. (2018-02-20)

An emergency method for measuring strontium levels in milk can be used in routine studies
The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country's Nuclear and Radiological Safety research group is participating in validations of methods proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. In a recently published study, this group has tested the viability of a method proposed by the international agency to measure radioactive strontium in milk, developed for cases of nuclear emergency, so that it can be incorporated into routine radiological monitoring measurements. (2017-09-08)

Study examines usability of electronic health records, safety events
The usability of electronic health records may be associated with some safety events where patients were possibly harmed. (2018-03-27)

Extending food safety training to other countries could save live
Food safety practices that Americans take for granted -- washing hands with soap, refrigeration, and not cutting raw meat and vegetables on the same surface without disinfection -- are not widely practiced in other places around the world, and researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences want to change that. (2017-12-15)

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnout
Among staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout. (2018-04-09)

Why some drivers slow down when using mobile phones: QUT research
With mobile phone distracted driving a growing road safety issue, a QUT study reveals why some drivers slow down when using a mobile phone but others don't. Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios, from QUT's Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety -- Queensland, believes education could help make the practice safer along with changing the design of mobile phones. His paper has just been published in the international journal Traffic Injury Prevention. (2017-01-24)

Drowsy driving in the ridesharing industry is a public safety risk
A position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) concludes that fatigue and sleepiness are inherent safety risks in the ridesharing industry. (2018-04-16)

Use of prescribed testosterone therapy in US decreases in recent years
Testosterone use in the United States tripled from 2001 through 2011, mostly in men without a clear indication. In late 2013 and early 2014, two studies reported increased heart attack and stroke associated with testosterone use, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety bulletin in early 2014. (2018-07-10)

National school lunch program aces safety test
The National School Lunch Program's (NSLP) strict safety standards work, according to a new University of Connecticut study that found food safety standards for ground beef supplied to the program are highly effective in keeping harmful bacteria out of school lunches nationwide. However, ground beef that fails NSLP inspection can be sold to other vendors, eventually making its way onto consumers' plates, meaning ground beef sold to schools may be the safest on the market. (2018-01-19)

Majority of mining-related injuries and illness in Illinois go unreported
Illnesses and injuries associated with working in Illinois mines are substantially underreported to the federal agency tasked with tracking these events, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine. (2018-03-09)

Study finds quality of care in VA health care system compares well to other settings
The quality of health care provided to US military veterans in Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities compares favorably with the treatment and services delivered outside the VA. In fact, VA facilities perform better in some cases when it comes to the safety and effectiveness of the treatment provided. This is according to review that was led by Dr. Courtney Gidengil of the RAND Corporation in the US, and appears in Springer's Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2016-07-18)

RNs can play key role in identifying medication issues to improve nursing home care
Amy Vogelsmeier, associate professor of nursing, found that registered nurses are better equipped to identify medication discrepancies that could cause nursing home residents harm. (2017-11-03)

Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seem
This is the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for adjuvants in pesticide formulations which are not currently subject to safety assessments. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects. The review suggests that new regulations are needed to protect people and the environment from toxic pesticide ingredients. (2018-03-08)

First of its kind study seeks to answer whether effects of 'abortion pill' can be reversed
Women who initiate medical abortion but opt to stop in the middle of treatment may be at risk for serious blood loss, a UC Davis Health study finds. Researchers found this is true even for women who use an experimental treatment that claims to 'reverse' the effects of the abortion pill. The study, published today in Obstetrics and Gynecology, provides important insights into the safety of using high doses of progesterone during early pregnancy to try to stop a medical abortion. (2019-12-05)

Contribution of MOTs to road safety
The study 'Contribution of MOTs to road safety and the protection of citizens' health and the environment,' conducted by the Motor Vehicle Safety Institute 'Duque de Santomauro' of Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, reveals that the Ministry of Transport tests (MOTs) prevent 133 deaths, nearly 12,000 injuries of differing severity and at least 17,700 traffic accidents a year. (2018-07-10)

One in 5 parents did not talk to kids about what to do if they got lost at an amusement park
New report indicates several opportunities to reduce safety risks for children in the amusement park environment. (2018-06-18)

Prevention programs significantly reduce ankle injuries in soccer athletes
Prevention programs are effective at reducing the risk of ankle injuries by 40 percent in soccer players, according to a new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS). (2016-09-07)

Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings
Physician burnout is at least equally responsible for medical errors as unsafe medical workplace conditions, if not more so, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-07-09)

National survey of emergency dept management of self-harm highlights successes, room for improvement
In a study published March 13 in JAMA Psychiatry, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital describe the results of a national survey to evaluate how frequently evidence-based management practices are used in EDs when treating patients who present for self-harm. (2019-03-13)

Introducing gun safety into health care providers' checklists to prevent teen suicide
Mental health services researchers at UMass Amherst and elsewhere assessed the needs of stakeholders who would implement a new approach to promoting a program, the Firearm Safety Check. They found some support for promoting firearm safety in pediatric primary care as a universal suicide prevention strategy for adolescents. (2019-01-07)

Back-to-school worries for parents? 1 in 3 very concerned bullying, cyberbullying
What parents are most worried about as their children prepare to head back to school. (2017-08-21)

Checklists in the operating room: More safety for patients
The use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist in the operating room considerably lowers the risks of surgery. This is the conclusion of Axel Fudickar and co-authors in their article in Issue 42 of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. (2012-11-05)

Survey: Misunderstanding food date labels linked with higher food discards
A new survey examining US consumer attitudes and behaviors related to food date labels found widespread confusion, leading to unnecessary discards, increased waste and food safety risks. The survey analysis was led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, which is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-02-19)

Over-the-counter laser pointers a threat to eyesight
Some laser pointers that can be bought over the counter are unsafe -- to the point that they can cause blindness. (2016-08-18)

No link between HPV vaccination and risk of autoimmune disorders: Study in CMAJ
A new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found no increased risk of autoimmune disorders in girls who received quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccination, adding to the body of evidence for the safety of the vaccine. (2018-05-28)

Patient beware: Indiana University researchers diagnose crowdsourced hospital ratings
Researchers from Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs compared social media ratings offered by patients with the extensive data available through the federal government's 'Hospital Compare' website. (2018-09-06)

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