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Popular Safety News and Current Events, Safety News Articles.
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Is very low LDL-C harmful?
Low-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major Cardiovascular (CV) risk factor. Accumulating evidence supports a linear association between LDL-C levels and CV risk. However, the lower limit of LDL-C that might offer CV benefits without any safety concerns is still a topic of debate.Achieving an LDL-C of 40-50 mg/dl seems to be safe, and importantly might offer CV beneficial effects. Data for attaining levels below 25 mg/dl is limited, however in favor of such reductions. (2019-01-01)

Working group urges better access to safe abortion, in developing world
On International Safe Abortion Day, Sept. 28, an international research group reports in a new paper with senior author Leontine Alkema at the University of Massachusetts Amherst that out of the 55.7 million abortions that are estimated to have occurred each year between 2010 and 2014, almost half (45.1 percent) were unsafe. Further, they found that the global proportion of unsafe abortions is significantly higher in developing countries than developed countries, 49.5 percent vs. 12.5 percent. (2017-09-27)

Analysis provides reassurance on the safety of biosimilars
Biosimilars have been available in the European Union since 2006. (2017-11-22)

UT Dallas researchers examine construction accidents in Gulf region
Inadequate training, limited use of safety equipment and a lack of government oversight contribute to deaths and injuries among construction workers in the rapidly developing Arabian Gulf region, also known as the Persian Gulf, a UT Dallas study found. (2016-10-13)

Study explores timing of muscle-related problems of statin use
Statins have been linked with muscle pain and other musculoskeletal adverse events (MAEs) in some patients. A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study has examined the timing of MAEs that develop during statin therapy and determined whether concomitant drugs used concurrently with statin therapy shifts the timing of MAEs. (2018-11-07)

NASA helps highlight lightning safety awareness week
Summertime arrives officially today in the northern hemisphere, and with it comes thunderstorms. As a result, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration named the week of June 19-25 National Lightning Safety Awareness Week. (2005-06-21)

New expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies
A new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA) finds that many Indigenous communities do not receive policing services that meet their safety and security needs, and the evidence suggests a relationship-based, community driven approach provides an opportunity to make meaningful and sustainable improvements. (2019-04-04)

Information technology can save police lives, according to a new study
Police officers face well-documented risks, with more than 50,000 a year assaulted on the job in the United States. But new research has found that the use of information technology by law enforcement agencies can reduce the number of police killed or injured in the line of duty by as much as 50%. (2019-12-11)

Safety events common for pharmaceuticals and biologics after FDA approval
Among more than 200 new pharmaceuticals and biologics approved by the US Food and Drug Administration from 2001 through 2010, nearly a third were affected by a postmarket safety event such as issuance of a boxed warning or safety communication, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-05-09)

Helmet-wearing increases risk-taking and sensation-seeking
A new study suggests helmet-wearing could increase risk-taking. (2016-01-25)

Study confirms safety of rapid algorithm to rule-out and rule-in myocardial infarction
The safety and efficacy of a rapid algorithm to rule-out and rule-in myocardial infarction has been confirmed in a study presented at ESC Congress today. (2017-08-27)

Latest stevia research published in Journal of Nutrition
The Journal of Nutrition recently published a comprehensive review of the latest stevia science in its July 2018 issue. Authored by several eminent scientists including members of the PureCircle Stevia Institute (PCSI) advisory board, the article 'Stevia Leaf to Stevia Sweetener: Exploring Its Science, Benefits, and Future Potential' details the current state of the science for stevia, stevia's safety and potential health benefits, as well as the potential for future research and applications. (2018-07-24)

Researchers compare drugs for treating severe hypertension in pregnancy
A recent meta-analysis of published studies has compared the efficacy and safety of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy. (2018-07-05)

Long-term dupilumab benefits adolescents with eczema
Results from a phase IIa open-label trial and a subsequent phase III open-label extension trial reinforce findings from an earlier short-term trial that adolescents with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, or eczema, can experience significant improvements with dupilumab. The results from these latest studies, which are reported in the British Journal of Dermatology, demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of the medication for up to 52 weeks of treatment. (2019-10-09)

K-State researchers findings on E. coli
Recent research at Kansas State University has found that cattle fed distiller's grain have an increased prevalence of E. coli 0157 in their hindgut. This particular type of E. coli is present in healthy cattle but poses a health risk to humans, who can acquire it through undercooked meat, raw dairy products and produce contaminated with cattle manure. (2007-12-04)

Homeland chemical security
The slow implementation of the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards in the USA as part of homeland security and anti-terrorism measures is leaving chemical plants vulnerable and putting at risk the safety of American citizens, according to research published in the International Journal of Critical Infrastructures. (2015-04-15)

New survey finds 21 percent of Americans report personal experience with medical errors
The vast majority of Americans are having positive experiences with the health care system, but 21 percent of adults report having personally experienced a medical error, according to a new national survey released today by the IHI/NPSF Lucian Leape Institute and NORC at the University of Chicago. The survey further finds that, when errors do occur, they often have lasting impact on the patient's physical health, emotional health, financial well-being, or family relationships. (2017-10-02)

Patient safety benefits when hospitals provide feedback to staff who report errors
A St. Jude Children's Research Hospital analysis suggests that to improve patient safety, hospitals should focus on providing feedback to staff about changes resulting from past staff reports of safety-related events. (2016-11-01)

Back to the future: Low-tech food-safety trainings still best for some audiences
While current training for food safety and sanitation usually incorporates high-technology presentations, such as videos and slide shows, there is still a need for low-tech approaches, according to Penn State researchers. (2018-07-02)

National poll: Most parents concerned about safety of teens using ride-sharing services
As teens prepare to leave home for college or live on their own in a new city, many may also be using ride-sharing services for the first time -- and that raises safety concerns for many parents -- a new national poll suggests. (2019-04-15)

Black box warning slows, but doesn't stop, codeine for kids after tonsil removal
Despite an FDA black box warning against prescribing children codeine following tonsil and adenoid removal, 1 in 20 children undergoing these surgeries continued to receive the opioid, a new study suggests. (2017-11-16)

Many US Airbnb venues may be falling short on fire safety, finds snapshot survey
Many US Airbnb venues may be falling short on fire safety, indicate the results of a snapshot survey of more than 120,500 rentals in 16 cities, published in the journal Injury Prevention. (2018-05-07)

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries are on the rise, Rutgers study finds
Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries among older riders are on the rise. (2019-10-29)

Polymer professor develops safer component for lithium batteries
What would happen if a lithium battery failed in an electric car or a much-needed biomedical device? Polymer Science Professor Dr. Yu Zhu, along with other researchers, is trying to prevent such failures with a new way involving polymer to make lithium batteries safer and perform better. (2018-06-26)

Long-term use of benralizumab appears safe, effective for severe asthma
Patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, who participated in three different Phase 3 trials of benralizumab (brand name Fasenra) and then enrolled in a long-term trial of the drug's efficacy and safety, continued to experience fewer exacerbations and improved pulmonary function and quality of life. (2019-05-20)

Does increased supervision of resident physicians reduce medical errors?
Increased supervision of residents by attending physicians who joined patient rounds didn't significantly reduce medical errors but residents reported decreased autonomy. (2018-06-04)

Blame often attributed to others in patient safety incident reports
This research is published in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

Are parking garages safe during hurricanes?
Recently, Dr. Thomas Schmidlin, meteorologist and professor of geography at Kent State University, completed research determining the safety of using parking garages for the general public as a (2007-06-28)

Hands-free just as distracting as handheld mobile phone use behind the wheel
Talking hands-free on a mobile phone while driving is just as distracting as a conversation using a hand-held phone, despite one being illegal and the other not, a QUT road safety study has found. Dr. Shimul (Md Mazharul) Haque, from QUT's School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment and Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety -- Queensland, presented his findings at a Driving Distraction Seminar held at QUT in November. (2016-12-12)

Farmers market vendors need training to improve food-safety practices
Many vendors at farmers markets take inadequate precautions to prevent the spread of foodborne illness, and they should be trained to reduce food-safety risks, according to Penn State researchers who completed the final phase of an innovative five-year study. (2018-11-01)

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity
In one of the first efforts to date to apply nanotechnology to targeted cancer therapeutics, researchers have created a nanoparticle formulation of a cancer drug that is both effective and nontoxic -- qualities harder to achieve with the free drug. (2016-02-10)

Safety evaluation of conditionally immortalized cells for renal replacement therapy
Here, the research team assessed the safety of conditionally immortalized proximal tubule epithelial cells for bioartificial kidney application, by using in vitro assays and athymic nude rats. They demonstrate that these cells do not possess key properties of oncogenically transformed cells, including anchorage-independent growth, lack of contact inhibition and apoptosis-resistance. Taken together, this study lays an important foundation towards bioartificial kidney development by confirming the safety of the cell line intended for incorporation. (2019-11-25)

Pregnancy poses no greater risk to breast cancer survivors
A recent study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that pregnancy does not incur a greater risk of relapse for survivors of breast cancer. (2017-10-26)

'Safety signals' may help slow down anxiety
For as many as one in three people, life events or situations that pose no real danger can spark a disabling fear, a hallmark of anxiety and stress-related disorders. Researchers at Yale University and Weill Cornell Medicine report on a novel way that could help combat such anxiety. In humans and in mice, a 'safety signal' -- a symbol or a sound that is never associated with adverse events -- can relieve anxiety through an entirely different brain network than that activated by existing behavioral therapy. (2019-12-09)

William J. Robb III, M.D., receives American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' highest honor
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons today presented the 2017 William W. Tipton, Jr., M.D., Leadership Award to William J. Robb III, M.D., from Glenview, Ill., at the Academy's 2017 Annual Meeting. (2017-03-16)

Radiologists, medical physicists work to make imaging procedures safer
The Radiological Society of North America reaffirmed its commitment to patient safety today in responding to a study and accompanying perspective on radiation dose from medical imaging procedures in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2009-08-27)

Pilot program improves staff confidence in dealing with airway emergencies
A patient safety team has restructured their protocols for treating airway failure in such a way that the change has measurably improved staff confidence to handle airway emergencies and can serve as a model for other health systems. (2018-07-23)

New drug clears psoriasis in clinical trials
About 80 percent of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis saw their disease completely or almost completely cleared with a new drug called ixekizumab, according to three large, long-term clinical trials led by Northwestern Medicine. (2016-06-09)

Study highlights need for tailored skin cancer prevention programs
Researchers at the GW Cancer Center found that sun safety practices for attendees at skin cancer screening events differ from the general public. (2019-07-09)

Study finds hormone therapy in transgender adults safe
In the most comprehensive review to date addressing the relative safety of hormone therapy for transgender persons, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have found that hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, may help reduce the barriers for transgender individuals to receive medical care. (2015-02-24)

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