Popular Salt News and Current Events

Popular Salt News and Current Events, Salt News Articles.
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Brain region central to placebo effect identified
Researchers have pinpointed a brain region central to the machinery of the placebo effect -- the often controversial phenomenon in which a person's belief in the efficacy of a treatment such as a painkilling drug influences its effect. (2007-07-18)

Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests
Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death? Maybe not, suggests a new umbrella review of meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials by Safi Khan, an assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine. (2019-07-08)

Road salt pollutes drinking water wells in suburban New York state
Road salt applied during the winter lingers in the environment, where it can pollute drinking water supplies. In a recent study in the Journal of Environmental Quality, researchers identify landscape and geological characteristics linked to elevated well water salinity in a suburban township in Southeastern New York. (2018-04-11)

Researchers discover efficient and sustainable way to filter salt and metal ions from water
With two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, joint research by Monash University, CSIRO and the University of Texas at Austin published today in Sciences Advances may offer a breakthrough new solution. (2018-02-09)

Catheter ablations reduce risks of stroke in heart patients with stroke history, study finds
Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation to treat the abnormal heart rhythm lower their long-term risk of a recurrent stroke by 50 percent, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. (2016-11-13)

PET myocardial perfusion imaging more effective than SPECT scans in detecting coronary disease
Patients who receive cardiac positron emission testing (PET) imaging instead of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan experienced a significant increase in the detection of severe obstructive coronary artery disease, according to researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. (2018-03-10)

Weight loss surgery linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a past history of weight loss surgery. (2018-03-07)

RNA discovery could help boost plant heat, drought tolerance
The discovery of a RNA that can increase drought and salt tolerance in thale cress could illuminate a new research approach and hold implications for other plants, including food crops. (2017-09-18)

Follow-up cholesterol testing reduces risk of reocurrence for heart attack and stroke patients
If you have a heart attack or stroke, it's important to get your 'bad' cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated with a reduced risk of suffering another serious cardiovascular episode. (2017-11-12)

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill
Nine years ago tomorrow -- April 20, 2010 -- crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands. (2019-04-19)

New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology. (2019-10-22)

Too much salt weakens the immune system
A high-salt diet is not only bad for one's blood pressure, but also for the immune system. This is the conclusion of a study under the leadership of the University Hospital Bonn. Mice fed a high-salt diet were found to suffer from much more severe bacterial infections. Human volunteers who consumed additional six grams of salt per day also showed pronounced immune deficiencies. This amount corresponds to the salt content of two fast food meals. (2020-03-25)

Bacterial pneumonia far more dangerous to the heart than viral pneumonia, study finds
Heart complications in patients diagnosed with bacterial pneumonia are more serious than in patients diagnosed with viral pneumonia, according to new research. (2018-11-11)

A sweeter way to make green products
University of Delaware researchers have invented a more efficient process for extracting the sugars from wood chips, corn cobs and other organic waste from forests and farms. This biorenewable feedstock could serve as a cheaper, sustainable substitute for the petroleum used in manufacturing tons of consumer goods annually -- goods that consumers want to be greener. (2017-09-08)

Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubes
At just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals. (2017-08-24)

Surprising killer of southeastern salt marshes: Common sea snails
From South Carolina to Texas, salt marshes have experienced a massive die-off in recent years, threatening fisheries and leaving coastal areas vulnerable to flooding. The culprit, ecologists have long thought, is degraded soil. But new research, published in Science, points to the periwinkle - cordgrass consuming sea snails - as a major contributor to salt marsh loss. (2005-12-15)

Oldest evaporite deposit to date provides unique look into early Earth's atmosphere
An analysis of salt mineral sediments, or evaporites, from the oldest deposit of this type discovered to date provides a unique window on the atmospheric conditions of early Earth following the Great Oxidation Event 2.3 billion years ago. (2018-03-22)

Food advertisements in your magazine: How healthy are they?
At a time when many of us are thinking about how to get rid of a few extra pounds, research at Newcastle University has shown that even the magazine you read may affect how healthy your diet is. (2009-01-19)

Trouble with parasites? Just migrate!
The researchers developed a model to explore whether combating infection could, in theory, be a potential benefit of migration. (2016-05-27)

How air pollution affects homeless populations
When air quality worsens, either from the smoke and ozone of summer or the inversion of winter, most of us stay indoors. But for individuals experiencing homelessness, that's not always an option. In a new study, researchers from the University of Utah document the effect of air pollution on people experiencing homelessness, finding that nearly all notice and are impacted by air pollution, whether or not they reside in shelters. (2020-11-13)

High salt intake associated with doubled risk of heart failure
High salt intake is associated with a doubled risk of heart failure, according to a 12-year study in more than 4 000 people presented today at ESC Congress. (2017-08-27)

Global warming's next surprise: Saltier beaches
Batches of sand from a beach on the Delaware Bay are yielding insights into the powerful impact of temperature rise and evaporation along the shore that are in turn challenging long-held assumptions about what causes beach salinity to fluctuate in coastal zones that support a rich network of sea creatures and plants. (2016-08-11)

Salty snow could affect air pollution in the Arctic
In pictures, the Arctic appears pristine and timeless with its barren lands and icy landscape. In reality, the area is rapidly changing. Scientists are working to understand the chemistry behind these changes to better predict what could happen to the region in the future. One team reports in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry A that sea salt could play a larger role in the formation of local atmospheric pollutants than previously thought. (2016-10-12)

North American waterways are becoming saltier and more alkaline
A University of Maryland-led study is the first to assess long-term changes in freshwater salinity and pH at the continental scale. Drawn from data recorded at 232 USGS monitoring sites across the country over the past 50 years, the analysis shows significant increases in both salinization and alkalinization. The results also suggest a close link between the two properties, with different salt compounds combining to do more damage than any one salt on its own. (2018-01-08)

Hormone imbalance causes treatment-resistant hypertension
British researchers have discovered a hormone imbalance that explains why it is very difficult to control blood pressure in around 10 per cent of hypertension patients. (2018-04-11)

Study highlights the health and economic benefits of a US salt reduction strategy
New research, published in PLOS Medicine, conducted by researchers at the University of Liverpool, Imperial College London, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts and collaborators as part of the Food-PRICE project, highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration's proposed voluntary salt policy. (2018-04-10)

NREL investigates coatings needed for concentrating solar power
Next-generation concentrating solar power (CSP) plants require high-temperature fluids, like molten salts, in the range of 550-750 degrees Celsius to store heat and generate electricity. At those high temperatures, however, the molten salts eat away at common alloys used in the heat exchangers, piping, and storage vessels of CSP systems. New research at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is aimed at mitigating corrosion levels in CSP plants with nickel-based coatings. (2017-09-18)

Healthy diet reduces asthma symptoms
People who eat a healthy diet experience fewer asthma symptoms and better control of their condition, according to a new study published in the European Respiratory Journal. Diets with better asthma outcomes are characterized by being healthier, with greater consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Unhealthy diets, with high consumption of meat, salt and sugar, have the poorest outcomes. (2018-07-11)

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth
In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake. (2017-10-16)

U CO2 sensor network shows effects of metro growth
In a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by atmospheric scientists Logan Mitchell and John Lin report that suburban sprawl increases CO2 emissions more than similar population growth in a developed urban core. (2018-03-05)

Scientists take step toward safer batteries by trimming lithium branches
A collaborative team of researchers from Shinshu University in Japan have found a new way to curb some of the potential dangers posed by lithium ion batteries. Repeated lithium deposition/dissolution during charge/discharge can cause serious accidents due to the deposition of lithium dendrites that penetrate the separator and induce internal short-circuiting. The researchers hope to solve the issues with a plating technology and eventually achieve a compact and high-capacity battery. (2018-02-23)

A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compounds
Scientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions. (2018-02-08)

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement dramatically improves heart patients' quality of life
Patients who undergo a transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR -- a minimally-invasive surgical procedure that repairs a damaged heart valve -- experienced a significant increase in their quality of life, according to a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. (2018-03-11)

University of Houston study shows BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible
A study published in PLoS ONE by two researchers at the University of Houston shows that arthropods living in coastal salt marshes affected by BP oil spill were damaged but they were able to recover if their host plants remained healthy. (2012-03-07)

Transparent eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwater
An innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists at the University of California can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent. The team details their work in the April 25 issue of Science Robotics. (2018-04-25)

Study shows star-shaped bread popular with children and could encourage more healthy eating
New research on different colors and shapes of bread, presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26), shows that star-shaped bread is particularly popular with young children and could help them make healthy food choices. (2018-05-25)

New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevines
A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines. (2017-11-27)

Scientists present El Nino
The ecological effects of the strong 2015-2016 El NiƱo. Carbon burial in aquatic ecosystems. The presence of pharmaceuticals in streams. (2017-02-23)

Gene boosts rice growth and yield in salty soil
Soil salinity poses a major threat to food security, greatly reducing the yield of agricultural crops. Rising global temperatures are expected to accelerate the buildup of salt in soil, placing an increasing burden on agricultural production. In a new study published in The Plant Cell, a team of researchers identified a gene that limits yield losses in rice plants exposed to salt stress and deciphered the underlying mechanism. (2018-03-23)

Pass the salt: Study finds average consumption safe for heart health
New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt. The research, published in The Lancet, is by scientists of the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, along with their research colleagues from 21 countries. (2018-08-09)

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