Popular Saturated Fat News and Current Events

Popular Saturated Fat News and Current Events, Saturated Fat News Articles.
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Healthy lifestyle smartphone app slows artery aging
Using a healthy lifestyle smartphone application helps to slow artery ageing, according to results from the EVIDENT II trial presented today at EuroHeartCare 2018, the European Society of Cardiology's annual nursing congress. (2018-06-09)

Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

Certain heart fat associated with higher risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women
For the first time, researchers have pinpointed a type of heart fat, linked it to a risk factor for heart disease and shown that menopausal status and estrogen levels are critical modifying factors of its associated risk in women. (2017-01-30)

Obesity and health problems: New research on a safeguard mechanism
Obesity and health problems: Researchers at Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital in Montreal shed light on a safeguard mechanism. (2018-03-16)

Comfort food leads to more weight gain during stress
Australian researchers have discovered a new molecular pathway in the brain that triggers more weight gain in times of stress. (2019-04-25)

Diabetes medicine reduces liver fat in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
In people with type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common and can progress to a severe liver disease known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Now a study has found that empagliflozin, a newer treatment for type 2 diabetes, reduces liver fat in patients with NAFLD and diabetes. Results of the randomized controlled study, called the E-LIFT Trial, will be presented Monday at the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill., during a late-breaking abstracts session. (2018-03-19)

Reverse your diabetes -- and you can stay diabetes-free long-term
A new study from Newcastle University, UK, has shown that people who reverse their diabetes and then keep their weight down remain free of diabetes. (2016-03-21)

The genes are not to blame
Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat. According to the current state of knowledge, the expedience of gene-based dietary recommendations has yet to be proven. (2018-07-20)

Risk of a fatty heart linked to race, type of weight gain in middle-aged women
A woman's race and where on her body she packs on pounds at midlife could give her doctor valuable clues to her likelihood of having greater volumes of heart fat, a potential risk factor for heart disease, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. (2017-08-02)

Researchers discover experimental obesity drug prevents development of kidney stones
Copenhagen: Scientists have found that a drug connected with fat regulation prevents the formation of kidney stones in mice. This early work opens the possibility of developing drugs which may help prevent kidney stones in at-risk individuals. The work is presented at the European Association of Urology Conference in Copenhagen. (2018-03-16)

Fiber protects against cardiovascular disease -- especially in women
Foods high in fiber provide good protection against cardiovascular disease, and the effect is particularly marked in women. This is shown in a new study from Lund University in Sweden. (2012-04-16)

How does the environment affect obesity?
Researchers will be examining how agricultural and food processing practices may affect brown fat activity directly or indirectly. Research will look at how toxicants such as pesticides or herbicides and artificial sweeteners or high fructose corn syrups could alter brown fat (BAT). (2016-05-02)

Heart-healthy diets are naturally low in dietary cholesterol and can help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke
Eating a heart-healthy dietary pattern rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, vegetable oils and nuts, which is also limits salt, red and processed meats, refined-carbohydrates and added sugars, is relatively low in dietary cholesterol and supports healthy levels of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol. (2019-12-16)

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain
When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. (2018-01-04)

Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whites, researchers find
People who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging in resistance exercise differ dramatically in how their muscles build protein, a process called protein synthesis, during the post-workout period, researchers report in a new study. Specifically, the post-workout muscle-building response in those eating whole eggs is 40 percent greater than in those consuming an equivalent amount of protein from egg whites, the team found. (2017-12-20)

Experimental drug reverses hair loss and skin damage linked to fatty diet, shows new study in mice
In a series of experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins investigators have used an experimental compound to successfully reverse hair loss, hair whitening and skin inflammation linked by previous studies to human diets heavy in fat and cholesterol. (2018-07-30)

Obesity is in the eye of the beholder
Doctors have a specific definition of what it means to be overweight or obese, but in the social world, gender, race and generation matter a lot for whether people are judged as 'thin enough' or 'too fat.' (2017-05-18)

Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found. (2018-01-12)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone mass
Bone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. (2017-08-09)

Stress could help activate brown fat
Mild stress stimulates the activity and heat production by brown fat associated with raised cortisol, according to a study published today in Experimental Physiology. (2016-02-08)

Citrus fruits could help prevent obesity-related heart disease, liver disease, diabetes
Oranges and other citrus fruits are good for you -- they contain plenty of vitamins and substances, such as antioxidants, that can help keep you healthy. Now a group of researchers reports that these fruits also help prevent harmful effects of obesity in mice fed a Western-style, high-fat diet. The researchers are presenting their work today at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-21)

Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adults
In a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced). Of concern, they were also more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors and over-concern about weight. (2018-06-18)

Enzyme plays a key role in calories burned both during obesity and dieting
Ever wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? In both cases the body is trying to defend its weight by regulating energy expenditure. In a paper publishing in Cell on Feb. 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure during both obesity and fasting. (2018-02-08)

Study finds childhood fitness reduces long-term cardiovascular risks of childhood obesity
Aerobic exercise might be a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity. (2016-05-24)

Childhood body composition may help determine future lung health
Boys and girls with more muscle mass in childhood and adolescence have higher lung function. (2019-01-11)

New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgery
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released new data which shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. (2018-03-01)

Fat distribution in women and men provides clues to heart attack risk
It's not the amount of fat in your body but where it's stored that may increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The study looked at the differences in fat distribution patterns among overweight and obese men and women and their associated cardiometabolic risk. (2017-11-28)

Researchers defy biology: Mice remain slim on burger diet
Our bodies are extremely efficient at storing fat from food into our fat tissue. In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have managed to completely block the development of obesity. The researchers deleted an enzyme and made it impossible for mice to increase their amount of fat tissue, despite the mice eating an extremely fatty diet. They are hoping the findings will open new avenues for better treatment of obesity. (2018-05-03)

Fat cat? Here's how much to feed to lose weight
Does your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he's overweight. Maybe you've switched to the 'diet' cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it's not easy to get that weight off. A new study from the University of Illinois explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down. (2018-01-24)

Slower calorie burn in pregnancy may mean more retained baby weight in obese black moms
Differences in the way women with obesity burn calories during pregnancy may be a contributor to long-term postpartum weight retention in black moms. The findings, which suggest a need for more individualized pregnancy weight gain recommendations for obese women, will be presented today at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego. (2018-04-22)

Study suggests promising new Rx target for obesity and diabetes
Research led by Suresh Alahari, Ph.D., Fred Brazda Professor of Biochemistry and Microbiology at LSU Health New Orleans, suggests a novel protein may be a promising therapeutic target to treat or prevent metabolic disorders. The study also reported for the first time metabolic distinctions between male and female mice. (2018-12-17)

Blood pressure diet improves gout blood marker
A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and reduced in fats and saturated fats (the DASH diet), designed decades ago to reduce high blood pressure, also appears to significantly lower uric acid, the causative agent of gout. Further, the effect was so strong in some participants that it was nearly comparable to that achieved with drugs specifically prescribed to treat gout, a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers shows. (2016-08-15)

New study finds adult fresh pear consumers had a lower body weight than non-pear consumers
The epidemiologic study, led by Carol O'Neil of the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, used a nationally representative analytic sample to examine the association of fresh pear consumption with nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors in adults. (2015-12-08)

Muscle more important than fat in regulating heat loss from the hands
New study suggests that people with more muscle mass are less susceptible to heat loss and heat up faster after cold exposure than non-muscular individuals. (2018-02-14)

Study finds that weight loss after obesity surgery can rapidly restore testosterone production and sex drive in morbidly obese men
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows that weight reduction following a sleeve gastrectomy (obesity surgery), which reduces the size of the stomach, can rapidly reverse obesity-related hypogonadism in morbidly obese men, restoring normal levels of testosterone and sex drive. (2018-05-25)

Eating nuts linked with lower risk of fatal heart attack and stroke
Eating nuts at least twice a week is associated with a 17% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology. (2019-08-31)

New patch aims to turn energy-storing fats into energy-burning fats
A new approach to reducing bulging tummy fats has shown promise in laboratory trials. It combines a new way to deliver drugs, via a micro-needle patch, with drugs that are known to turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat. (2017-12-28)

The dangers of hidden fat: Exercise is your best defense against deep abdominal fat
Researchers analyzed two types of interventions -- lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) -- to learn how best to defeat fat lying deep in the belly. (2019-02-01)

Should obesity be recognized as a disease?
With obesity now affecting almost a third (29%) of the population in England, and expected to rise to 35% by 2030, should we now recognize it as a disease? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2019-07-17)

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