Popular Seafloor News and Current Events

Popular Seafloor News and Current Events, Seafloor News Articles.
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Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems. (2019-06-11)

How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the long run. (2018-02-14)

ANU scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils
Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts. (2019-03-25)

How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean water
New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years. (2017-11-10)

Sea floor uplift after last ice age causes methane release in the Arctic today
Present-day release of methane from an area of the Arctic Ocean is an effect of the uplift of the sea floor, rather than anthropogenic ocean warming, a new study in Nature Communications states. (2018-02-06)

World's first animals caused global warming
The evolution of Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, new research shows. (2018-07-02)

A close-up look at an uncommon underwater eruption
A new paper published Jan. 10, 2018, in the journal Science Advances describes the first up-close investigation of the largest underwater volcanic eruption of the past century. (2018-01-10)

Mexico's 2017 earthquake emerged from a growing risk zone
Under Mexico, where the Cocos Plate from the Pacific Ocean slides under the North American Plate, a bending line of hills, created when the seafloor first formed, sits atop a flattened area of subduction. That newly recognized combination, scientists report, has created a fault that likely explains last September's Puebla earthquake, scientists report. (2018-03-12)

Retreat of the ice followed by millennia of methane release
Methane was seeping from the seafloor for thousands of years following the retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet, shows a groundbreaking new study in Nature Communications. (2016-05-13)

Seafloor creatures destroyed by ice action during ice ages
New research by marine scientists at National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOC) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) will mean that text books will have to be rewritten. They reveal that ice ages were a time of mass destruction as whole communities of animals were wiped out by ice sheets scouring the sea floor. (2005-10-17)

Geophysicists and atmospheric scientists partner to track typhoons' seismic footprints
A remarkable collaboration between atmospheric science and geophysics could change the way we think about storms and seismicity, and could lead to an answer to the often-asked 'Are hurricanes getting stronger?' Princeton University's Lucia Gualtieri and Salvatore Pascale led an international team that has identified the seismic footprint of typhoons and hurricanes, which allows climate scientists to add decades to their dataset of powerful storms. (2018-02-15)

Cold production of new seafloor
Magma steadily emerges between oceanic plates. It pushes the plates apart, builds large underwater mountains and forms new seafloor. This is one of the fundamental processes that constantly change the face of the Earth. But there are also times when new seabed is created without any volcanism, by un-roofing mantle material directly at the seafloor. Scientists led by GEOMAR, Germany have published the first estimation based on seismic data on how much seafloor is produced this way. (2018-05-24)

Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of seafarers' imaginations. (2019-02-01)

How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)

Tectonic plates act like variable thermostat
PNAS study finds that heat loss from Earth's mantle is highly variable and depends on tectonic plate arrangement. Earth currently at relatively low level of heat loss. (2007-08-13)

Earth's stable temperature past suggests other planets could also sustain life
Research about temperatures on the early Earth have ranged from a virtually ice-covered surface to a very hot planet that could not support most of today's lifeforms. New computer simulations show fairly moderate average temperatures and more stable ocean pH -- which helps explain how life evolved here, and might emerge on other planets. (2018-04-02)

Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
New research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs. (2017-06-27)

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents
At the Fall 2017 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, scientists from around the world will present 19 talks and posters about the Coordinated Canyon Experiment -- the most extensive, long-term effort to monitor turbidity currents ever attempted. The results of this two-year project challenge existing paradigms about what causes turbidity currents, what they look like, and how they work. (2017-12-11)

Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?
Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane are locked up as solid gas hydrates in the continental slopes of ocean margins. Their stability depends on low temperatures and high pressure. However, other factors that influence gas hydrate stability are not as well understood. A German-Norwegian research team has found evidence off the coast of Norway that the amount of sediment deposited on the seafloor can play a crucial role. The study has been published today in the international journal Nature Communications. (2018-02-12)

Lost continent of Zealandia: Scientists return from expedition to sunken land
After a nine-week voyage to study the lost, submerged continent of in the South Pacific, a team of 32 scientists from 12 countries has arrived in Hobart, Tasmania, aboard the research vessel JOIDES Resolution. (2017-09-26)

Observing the development of a deep-sea greenhouse gas filter
In a long-term study, marine scientists from Bremen for the first time observed the colonization of a deep-sea mud volcano after its eruption. Only slowly, rich life develops around the crater. The first settlers are tiny organisms that eat methane escaping from the volcano. Thereby, they keep this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere. The present study describes how the colonization of the mud volcano proceeds and when the tiny methane-munchers get going. (2018-09-28)

Tiny fossils, huge slides: Are diatoms the key to Earth's biggest slides?
The biggest landslides on Earth aren't on land, but on the seafloor. These mega-slides can move thousands of cubic kilometers of material, and sometimes trigger tsunamis. Yet, remarkably, they occur on nearly flat slopes of less than three degrees. (2018-02-12)

Evidence for a giant flood in the central Mediterranean Sea
Marine scientists have uncovered evidence of one of the largest floods in Earth's history in the central Mediterranean seafloor. The flood, known as the Zanclean flood, is thought to have ended the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), a period during which the Mediterranean Sea became partially dried up. (2018-03-21)

Earthquake rupture halted by seamounts
Experts expected for some time that one of the next mega earthquakes occurs off northern Chile. But when the earth did tremble around the northern Chilean city of Iquique in 2014, the strength and areal extent of shaking was much smaller than anticipated. Geologists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Institute of Marine Sciences in Barcelona (Spain), and the German Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources now publish a possible explanation in the international journal Nature Communications. (2015-09-30)

Quakes under Pacific floor reveal unexpected circulatory system
Seismologists working under 2,500 meters of water on a mid-ocean ridge in the eastern Pacific Ocean have used tiny earthquakes to make the first images of the interior of a hydrothermal vent system, and it does not look at all the way many had assumed it would. (2008-01-09)

Scientists break record by finding northernmost hydrothermal vent field
Inside the Arctic Circle, scientists have found black smoker vents farther north than anyone has ever seen before. The cluster of vents -- one towering nearly four stories -- are venting water as hot as 570 F. Dissolved sulfide minerals that solidify when vent water hits the icy cold of the deep sea have, over the years, accumulated around the vents in what is one of the most massive hydrothermal sulfide deposits ever found on the seafloor. (2008-07-24)

Giant larvaceans transfer ocean pollution by ingesting plastic waste
Pinkie-sized plankton called giant larvaceans can ingest tiny pieces of plastic and pass them in their fecal pellets, which then sink to the bottom of the ocean. (2017-08-16)

New technique offers clues to measure the deoxygenation of the ocean
The living, breathing ocean may be slowly starting to suffocate. More than two percent of the ocean's oxygen content has been depleted during the last half century, according to reports, and marine 'dead zones' continue to expand throughout the global ocean. This deoxygenation, triggered mainly by more fertilizers and wastewater flowing into the ocean, pose a serious threat to marine life and ecosystems. (2017-08-09)

Unusual new zoantharian species is the first described solitary species in over 100 years
A very unusual new species of zoantharian was discovered by two researchers in Okinawa. Although most zoantharians are colonial and many are known from coral reefs, the new species lives a solitary life in muddy habitats. This species, now published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, is the first of its genus described in over 100 years. (2016-07-25)

Release of ancient methane due to changing climate kept in check by ocean waters
Ocean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane. But methane only acts as a greenhouse gas if and when it reaches the atmosphere. Environmental scientists at the University of Rochester and their collaborators recently set out to discover whether or not this ancient-sourced methane, which is released due to warming ocean waters, survives the journey from the seafloor and reaches the atmosphere. (2018-01-17)

Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath
By combining ocean models, animal metabolism and fossil records, researchers show that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by global warming that left animals unable to breathe. As temperatures rose and the metabolism of marine animals sped up, the warmer waters could not hold enough oxygen for their survival. (2018-12-06)

New atlas provides highest-resolution imagery of the Polar Regions seafloor
The most comprehensive and high-resolution atlas of the seafloor of both Polar Regions is presented this week (Tuesday April 25) at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. (2017-04-25)

World-first uses satellites and ocean models to explain Antarctic seafloor biodiversity
In a world-first, a research team of Australian and international scientists has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor. (2017-12-11)

New images from under Alaska seafloor suggest high tsunami danger
Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign. They say the feature closely resembles one that produced the 2011 Tohoku tsunami off Japan, killing some 20,000 people and melting down three nuclear reactors. Such structures may lurk unrecognized in other areas of the world, say the scientists. The findings appear today in the print edition of the journal Nature Geoscience. (2017-08-01)

More 'losers' than 'winners' predicted for Southern Ocean seafloor animals
A new study of the marine invertebrates living in the seas around Antarctica reveals there will be more 'losers' than 'winners' over the next century as the Antarctic seafloor warms. The results are published in the journal Nature Climate Change this week. (2017-09-04)

This week from AGU: Greenland's thawing ice sheet, Nepal's landslides, and more
This week from AGU are papers on Greenland's thawing ice sheet, Nepal's landslides, and four more research spotlights. (2016-08-03)

Why the tongue of the Pine Island Glacier suddenly shrank
The Pine Island Glacier in Western Antarctica is not only one of the fastest-flowing ice streams in the Southern Hemisphere; over the past 11 years, four major icebergs have calved from its floating tongue. (2018-06-15)

Researchers help define Southern Ocean's geological features
The scientists present data from the region that show the Australian-Antarctic Ridge has isotopic compositions distinct from both the Pacific and Indian mantle domains. (2019-02-08)

EARTH: Making tracks through the dinosaur diamond
EARTH Magazine travels through time to meet the major players of the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous -- from sauropods and theropods to protomammals -- that created the rich tapestry of life in this region millions of years ago. (2016-04-26)

Researchers ask important questions on what happens to oil after a spill
Very little is known about what happens to oil in the ocean after an oil spill and what happens to it once a chemical dispersant has been applied. New research summarizes what is known and what important knowledge gaps remain. (2016-11-21)

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