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Popular Seals News and Current Events, Seals News Articles.
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Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)
Ocean winds influence seal pup migration
Scientists have confirmed what native Alaskans have observed for centuries -- maritime winds influence the travel patterns of northern fur seal pups. (2018-02-13)
Unexpected helpers in wound healing
Nerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown. (2018-01-24)
Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predicted
A new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. (2018-02-01)
Tracking data reveal the secret lives of marine animals
Tracking devices deployed on wild animals have revealed unexpected behaviors and migratory patterns in marine animals ranging from sharks and seals to turtles and albatrosses. (2018-02-26)
Fish accounted for surprisingly large part of the Stone Age diet
New research at Lund University in Sweden can now show what Stone Age people actually ate in southern Scandinavia 10 000 years ago. (2018-03-19)
Drone photos offer faster, cheaper data on key Antarctic species
Scientists flying drones in Antarctica have demonstrated a cheaper, faster and simpler way to gauge the condition of leopard seals, which can weigh more than a half ton and reflect the health of the Antarctic ecosystem that they and a variety of commercial fisheries rely on. (2017-11-29)
Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? (2018-04-05)
Study offers detailed insight into early-life behavior of grey seal pups at sea
Male and female grey seal pups show distinct behavioural differences as they learn to forage effectively in the early stages of their independence, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth in conjunction with the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St Andrews and Abertay University. (2017-11-14)
Study of sleeping fur seals provides insight into the function of REM sleep
All land mammals and birds have two types of sleep: rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (also called slow-wave sleep). (2018-06-07)
#EpicDuckChallenge shows we can count on drones
A few thousand rubber ducks, a group of experienced wildlife spotters and a drone have proven the usefulness and accuracy of drones for wildlife monitoring. (2018-02-13)
Polar bears finding it harder to catch enough seals to meet energy demands
A new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs. (2018-02-01)
Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care
Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2017-03-08)
Translating elephant seal data into a symphony provides surprising insights
Sonification of 10 years of oceanic migration of these seals reveals coordinated swimming. (2018-04-23)
UAlberta biologists show that female seals have consistent personalities
Female seals don't change their spots, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2018-06-27)
Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular aging
A novel nutraceutical called nicotinomide riboside has been found to kick-start the same biological pathways as calorie restriction does, and boost arterial health in people with mild hypertension. (2018-03-29)
Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the sea
Every year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic. (2017-03-30)
Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut
As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests (2019-03-19)
Coping with climate stress in Antarctica
Some Antarctic fish living in the planet's coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels the ocean. (2018-01-16)
Recovery of West Coast marine mammals boosts consumption of chinook salmon
The researchers estimate that from 1975 to 2015, the yearly biomass of chinook salmon consumed by pinnipeds (sea lions and harbor seals) and killer whales increased from 6,100 to 15,200 metric tons, and from five to 31.5 million individual salmon. (2017-11-20)
New study provides information on the secret life of an enigmatic Antarctic apex predator
Scientists from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have, for the first time, tracked the lives of leopard seals as they migrate around Antarctica. (2018-06-05)
New study to characterize methane emissions from natural gas compressor stations
Colorado State University, home to some of the world's top researchers on methane emissions, will lead a Department of Energy-supported project to analyze emissions from a specific part of the natural gas supply chain: compressor stations. (2016-10-21)
Seals, birds and humans compete for fish in the Baltic Sea
In Sweden and in other parts of Europe there are concerns that seals and birds compete with humans for fish resources. (2017-11-13)
Stanford researchers learn why aquatic mammals need to be big, but not too big
Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food. (2018-03-26)
Scripps marine research physiologist pioneer to receive lifetime achievement award
Gerald Kooyman, emeritus professor of biology at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will be the first recipient of a new lifetime achievement award bestowed by the Society for Marine Mammalogy during the society's 16th Biennial Conference on the Biology of Marine Mammals. (2005-12-05)
NOAA scientists find killer whales in Antarctic waters prefer weddell seals over other prey
NOAA's Fisheries Service scientists studying the cooperative hunting behavior of killer whales in Antarctic waters observed the animals favoring one type of seal over all other available food sources, according to a study published in the journal Marine Mammal Science. (2011-03-30)
Aerial drone photos can yield accurate measurements of leopard seals
Leopard seal measurements derived from aerial drone photographs are as accurate as those taken manually, according to a study published Nov. (2017-11-29)
Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction
Population geneticists at Bielefeld University and the British Antarctic Survey have found that eleven seal species only narrowly escaped extinction. (2018-11-16)
Novel antioxidant makes old blood vessels seem young again
Older adults who take an antioxidant that specifically targets mitochondria see age-related changes in blood vessels reverse by the equivalent of 15 to 20 years within six weeks, a new study shows. (2018-04-19)
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress
Stress from human disturbances could cause behavioral responses in narwhals that are inconsistent with their physiological capacities, researchers say. (2017-12-07)
Why are whales so big?
Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes -- big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can't find enough food. (2018-03-26)
Genetic adaptations to diving discovered in humans for the first time
Evidence that humans can genetically adapt to diving has been identified for the first time in a new study. (2018-04-19)
Fish shrinking as ocean temperatures rise
One of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. (2017-10-04)
Sealing properties and its influence factors of spherical mechanical seal
The spherical mechanical seal which can automatically adjust the contact state of sealing surfaces is proposed to replace the frequently used plane mechanical seal in order to solve the problems that when a marine stern shaft is bent with shafting misalignment and stern bearing wear factors, etc., the sealing properties of a plane mechanical seal is declined with the increase of both contact pressure and temperature of sealing surface. (2016-11-23)
More minorities labeled 'learning disabled' because of social inequities, study finds
A new Portland State University study suggests that the disproportionate placement of racial minorities into special education for learning disabilities is largely because of social inequities outside of schools rather than racially biased educators. (2018-08-21)
New study finds ecosystem changes following loss of great white sharks
A new study has documented unexpected consequences following the decline of great white sharks from an area off South Africa. (2019-02-13)
Smart speaker technology harnessed for hospital medical treatments
Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms, according to new research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2019-03-24)
Century-old seal pelts reveal changes in Ross Sea ecosystem
Scientists sampled a pile of frozen pelts left in a hut by Antarctic explorers for Weddell seal tissue from a century ago, at the very start of human activities in Antarctica. (2017-08-29)
In polar regions, warm-blooded marine predators rule
Even though diversity typically decreases from the tropics to the poles, in the frigid waters of the high latitudes, warm-blooded marine mammals and birds thrive, both in number and species richness. (2019-01-24)
Molting elephant seals add mercury to coastal seawater
As fish-eating predators at the top of the marine food chain, elephant seals accumulate high concentrations of mercury in their bodies. (2015-09-07)
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