Popular Secondhand Smoke News and Current Events

Popular Secondhand Smoke News and Current Events, Secondhand Smoke News Articles.
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Persistent plume
Thunderstorms generated by a group of giant wildfires in 2017 injected a small volcano's worth of aerosol into the stratosphere, creating a smoke plume that lasted for almost nine months. In a new paper in Science, authors led by Pengfei Yu (CIRES, NOAA, Jinan University), explore implications for climate modeling, including models of nuclear winter and geoengineering. (2019-08-08)

Simply speaking while infected can potentially spread COVID-19
COVID-19 can spread from asymptomatic but infected people through small aerosol droplets in their exhaled breath. Most studies of the flow of exhaled air have focused on coughing or sneezing; however, speaking while near one another is also risky. In Physics of Fluids, scientists used smoke and laser light to study the flow of expelled breath near and around two people conversing in various relative postures commonly found in the service industry. (2021-02-23)

How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process. (2019-10-17)

Want to quit smoking? Partner up
Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavor,' said study author Magda Lampridou, of Imperial College London, UK. (2019-04-12)

Public health experts support federally mandated smoke-free public housing
In response to a new federal rule mandating smoke-free policies in federally funded public housing authorities, three public health experts applaud the efforts of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to protect nonsmoking residents from the harmful effects of tobacco exposure. (2017-01-19)

A case where smoking helped
A mutation in the hemoglobin of a young woman in Germany was found to cause her mild anemia. But her father, who shared the mutation, did not develop anemia because his mutant hemoglobin was stabilized by carbon monoxide produced from his smoking. (2017-02-16)

Low-income, rural kids at higher risk for second- or third-hand smoke exposure
Infants and toddlers in low-income, rural areas may be at higher risk for second- and third-hand smoke than previously reported, according to new Penn State-led research. (2018-12-18)

Free lung-cancer screening in the Augusta area finds more than double the cancer rate of previous screenings
The first year of free lung cancer screening in the Augusta, Ga., area found more than double the rate seen in a previous large, national study as well as a Massachusetts-based screening for this No. 1 cancer killer. (2017-03-09)

Airway-on-a-chip could lead to new treatments for cigarette smoke-induced lung injury
Researchers have developed an airway-on-a-chip that supports living small-airway-lining cells from normal or diseased human lungs and an instrument that 'breathes' cigarette smoke in and out over these chips. Using this technology, researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University recreated and analyzed the effects of smoking at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level to understand the damage occurring in normal lung and in engineered lung tissues from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (2016-10-27)

Nicotine: The link between cigarette smoking and kidney disease progression?
The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke may accelerate some types of chronic kidney disease are currently unknown. A new study demonstrates for the first time that human mesangial cells (MC) - cells in the blood vessels of the kidneys -- are endowed with nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) á4, á5, á7, â2, â3, â4 and â5 (cells that interact with the nicotine in tobacco) and may play an active role in the development of certain kidney diseases. (2007-01-29)

Heart attack rates fall following national smoking bans
French researchers announced a striking 15 percent decrease in admissions of patients with myocardial infarction to emergency wards since the public ban on smoking came into effect last January. Researchers in Rome found an 11.2 percent reduction of acute coronary events since the January 2005 smoking ban took effect in Italy. The European Society of Cardiology wishes to stress the positive impact of smoking bans in all European countries that have adopted laws banning tobacco use in public places. (2008-02-26)

For smokers with HIV, smoking may now be more harmful than HIV itself
HIV-positive individuals who smoke cigarettes may be more likely to die from smoking-related disease than the infection itself, according to a new study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. (2016-11-03)

Cochrane news: Have national smoking bans worked in reducing harms in passive smoking?
The most robust evidence yet, published today in the Cochrane Library, suggests that national smoking legislation does reduce the harms of passive smoking, and particularly risks from heart disease. (2016-02-03)

NASA's look at the difference of a few days in the Thomas Fire
What a difference a few days can make in the life cycle of a fire. In this particular case, the Thomas Fire that is ongoing in the Ventura County around (and surrounding) in Southern California. (2017-12-20)

Toxicant levels up to 99 percent less in myblu™ aerosols compared to cigarette smoke
A new aerosol chemistry study presented at the 1st Scientific Summit -- Tobacco Harm Reduction: Novel products, Research & Policy, has revealed toxicant levels in myblu pod-system e-cigarette aerosols are up to 99 percent lower than in cigarette smoke. (2018-06-11)

How the UK smoking ban increased wellbeing
Married women with children reported the largest increase in well-being following the smoking bans in the UK in 2006 and 2007 but there was no comparable increase for married men with children. (2017-12-04)

Fewer Americans think smoking a pack a day poses a great health risk
About 3 out of 4 Americans agree that smoking cigarettes causes health problems, but public perception of the risks posed by smoking may be declining, according to a Duke Health study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. (2018-02-27)

NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provides copious information on California's fires
The Thomas fire, the fifth largest in California's history, continues to creep towards Montecito and Santa Barbara, and is currently 234,200 acres in size. That is about 4,200 acres larger than yesterday. Reports today are citing the fire at 20 percent containment per Inciweb. (2017-12-12)

Restaurant and bar smoking bans do reduce smoking, especially among the highly educated
Smoking risk drops significantly in college graduates when they live near areas that have completely banned smoking in bars and restaurants, according to a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology. (2018-01-11)

Stress main cause of smoking after childbirth
Mothers who quit smoking in pregnancy are more likely to light up again after their baby is born if they feel stressed. Researchers studied more than 1,000 new mothers and found that the stress of caring for a newborn, sleepless nights, social pressure, and the idea that they no longer need to protect the baby -- all contribute to relapse. They also found that women who felt they were being supported by a partner were less likely to start smoking again. (2015-09-09)

Smoke-damaged airway tissue restored on switching to glo
Studies by British American Tobacco show that airway tissue damaged on exposure to smoke was restored when exposed to vapor from glo rather than smoke. These results add to evidence that glo has reduced risk potential compared to cigarettes. glo is a tobacco heating product designed to heat rather than burn tobacco. Tests show that glo heated tobacco vapor has around 90-95 percent less of certain toxicants than cigarette smoke. (2018-03-14)

Smoking around your toddler could be just as bad as smoking while pregnant
Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre. (2015-06-21)

Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. (2018-01-24)

If you want to quit smoking, do it now
Smokers who try to cut down the amount they smoke before stopping are less likely to quit than those who choose to quit all in one go, Oxford University researchers have found. Their study is published in journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2016-03-14)

No adverse health impacts from long term vaping -- Study
A new peer-reviewed clinical trial to be published in the February edition of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology shows that regular use of e-cigarettes does not have any negative health impact on smokers. (2018-01-17)

Cannabis use up among parents with children in the home
Cannabis use increased among parents who smoke cigarettes, as well as among non-smoking parents, according to a new study. Cannabis use was nearly four times more common among cigarette smokers compared with non-smokers. Until now, little had been known about current trends in the use of cannabis among parents with children in the home, the prevalence of exposure to both tobacco and cannabis, and which populations might be at greatest risk. (2018-05-14)

Scientists discover how cigarette smoke causes cancer: Study points to new treatments, safer tobacco
Everyone has known for decades that that smoking can kill, but until now no one really understood how cigarette smoke causes healthy lung cells to become cancerous. In a research report published in the March print issue of The FASEB Journal, researchers show that hydrogen peroxide (or similar oxidants) in cigarette smoke is the culprit. This finding may help the tobacco industry develop (2008-02-28)

Advocating for raising the smoking age to 21
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21. He says the move would help curb access to tobacco products at an early age and lead to reductions in smoking prevalence. (2015-10-22)

Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will
Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (2018-01-18)

Children bear the brunt of secondhand smoke in Bangladesh
Children in Bangladesh are being exposed to high levels of secondhand smoke despite laws banning smoking in public spaces, a study carried out by the University of York suggests. (2017-12-08)

Smoking during pregnancy increases risk of SIDS
A new study provides the most direct evidence that there exists a causal link between smoking during pregnancy and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Clinicians have long considered prenatal cigarette smoke exposure a major contributing risk factor for SIDS, but researchers had not proved a casual relationship. Other contributing factors include disturbances of breathing and heart rate regulation and impaired arousal responses, thermal stress (primarily overheating from too high temperatures or too much clothing) and sleeping in the prone (belly-down) position. (2008-05-30)

Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient
University of Louisville School of Dentistry researcher David A. Scott, Ph.D., explores how cigarettes lead to colonization of bacteria in the body. (2016-05-31)

More harm than good: Assessing the nuclear arsenal tipping point
First study of its kind shows how detrimental nuclear attack would be for the aggressor nation. (2018-06-13)

Smokers might benefit from earlier colon cancer screening
New evidence suggests screening for colorectal cancer, which is now recommended to begin at age 50 for most people, should start five to 10 years earlier for individuals with a significant lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke, a University of Rochester Medical Center study said. (2008-02-13)

Hot spot on Enceladus causes plumes
Enceladus, the tiny satellite of Saturn, is colder than ice, but data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan has detected a hot spot that could mean there is life in the old moon after all. In fact, for researchers of the outer planets, Enceladus is so hot intellectually hot, it's smokin'. The hot spot is causing plumes of ice and vapor to arise above Enceladus, says Washington University's William B. McKinnon. (2007-12-17)

Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arrays
Michigan Tech researchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation. (2018-02-05)

Study suggests vaping does not stain teeth
Scientists at British American Tobacco have studied the impact of the vapor from Vype, an e-cigarette and glo, a tobacco-heating-product, on teeth and compared it to that of cigarette smoke. The results show that teeth exposed to Vype e-cigarette vapor or vapor from glo do not become stained, whereas teeth exposed to cigarette smoke became stained very quickly. (2018-03-24)

Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births
Dartmouth-led study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth. (2019-04-19)

Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants' lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy
Vitamin C may reduce the harm done to lungs in infants born to mothers who smoke during their pregnancy, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-12-07)

Australian fire beetle avoids the heat
The Australian jewel beetle Merimna atrata has several heat sensors. Originally it was thought that it uses them to detect forest fires as the insect lays its eggs in the wood of burned eucalyptus trees. Researchers at the University of Bonn were finally able to refute this hypothesis. Instead, the beetle appears to need its heat sensors for a different purpose: to not burn its feet on landing. The study has now been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-02-15)

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