Popular Sepsis News and Current Events

Popular Sepsis News and Current Events, Sepsis News Articles.
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Smart technology to help diagnose sepsis in children in Canada
Smart technology and artificial intelligence could be used to improve detection of sepsis in children in Canada, write authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-09-10)

Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)

'Pulling' bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection. This involves the blood of patients being mixed with magnetic iron particles, which bind the bacteria to them after which they are removed from the blood using magnets. The initial laboratory tests at Empa in St. Gallen have been successful, and seem promising. (2016-12-07)

Study: Sepsis survivors require follow-up support
Survivors of sepsis -- a life-threatening response to an infection -- have expressed a need for advocacy and follow-up support, according to a study authored by professors at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and published in Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing. (2019-11-19)

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics
Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation in bacteria. Every treated mouse survived. The breakthrough study, published in Scientific Reports, suggests infections in humans might be cured the same way. (2018-10-17)

Battling bacteria in the blood: Researchers tackle deadly infections
It's a leading cause of death, but no one knows for sure how and why it happens. It's a major source of health care costs, adding days or weeks to the hospital stays of millions of people. But no one fully understands how best to fight it. Now, new research is tackling the problem at its most basic level, in hopes of finding new and more effective ways to treat bacteremia and sepsis. (2008-11-10)

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance
An Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (2018-03-23)

Leaders in obstetric care gather to identify quality measures for high-risk pregnancies
The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine convened a workshop with other national leaders in obstetric care entitled, 'The Quality Measures in High-Risk Pregnancies Workshop.' A summary of the event has been published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (2017-10-10)

Packard/Stanford study suggests two causes for bowel disease in infants
New research from Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and the Stanford University School of Medicine is helping physicians unravel the cause of a deadly and mysterious bowel disease that strikes medically fragile newborn babies. The findings could lead to a better understanding of the disease and its medical management, and also shed light on the causes of sepsis, a major killer of children and young adults. (2009-04-27)

Immune system simulation shows need for multi-target treatments for sepsis
Using a computational model of the human immune system, scientists have shown that efforts to combat sepsis might be more effective if they targeted multiple steps in the molecular processes that drive the illness. This finding is presented in PLOS Computational Biology. (2018-02-15)

Measuring neutrophil motility could lead to accurate sepsis diagnosis
Microfluidic device developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may help solve a significant and persistent challenge in medicine -- diagnosing the life-threatening complication of sepsis. (2018-03-19)

Chlorinated lipids predict lung injury and death in sepsis patients
Researchers studied blood samples taken from patients diagnosed with sepsis and found that elevated chlorinated lipids predicted whether a patient would go on to suffer acute respiratory distress symptom (ARDS) and die within 30 days from a lung injury. (2018-01-31)

Want to beat antibiotic-resistant superbugs? Rethink that strep throat remedy
Antibiotics could become nearly useless by mid-century against intense infections due to bacteria evolving antibiotic resistance. And alternative treatments haven't been able to replace antibiotics in those big infections. It's time for a rethink: try reducing antibiotic use for small infections and find alternate remedies for them instead to slow the evolution of resistance. (2017-12-28)

A bacterium that attacks burn victims will soon be unarmed
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is amongst the main causes of infections and sepsis in people suffering from severe burns. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have succeeded in revealing the dynamics of the pathogen's physiology and metabolism during its growth in exudates, the biological fluids that seep out of burn wounds. This study allows to follow the strategies developed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to proliferate and, thus, to guide the development of innovative treatments. (2018-02-27)

Researchers identify key protein involved in triggering inflammation
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a protein that is crucial for activating inflammation -- both the good kind of inflammation that leads to healing wounds and fighting infection, as well as excessive inflammation where the immune system can damage tissues and organs. (2018-06-27)

Stronger, able older adults have better outcomes when hospitalized with critical illnesses
Until now, the role of strength before hospitalization has not been well-studied. To fill this knowledge gap, a research team created a study. The study was to learn how older adults' strength before they became ill affected how long they stayed in the hospital after being admitted to an ICU. They also learned whether or not the older adults died while in the hospital or within a year after discharge. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2018-01-16)

Vitamin D may be simple treatment to enhance burn healing
Patients with severe burns who have higher levels of vitamin D recover more successfully than those with lower levels, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. This study is the first to investigate the role of vitamin D in recovery from burn injury and suggests that vitamin D supplementation may be a simple and cost-effective treatment to enhance burn healing. (2017-11-05)

Multiple types of delirium in the ICU indicate high risk for long-term cognitive decline
Critically ill patients who experience long periods of hypoxic, septic or sedative-associated delirium, or a combination of the three, during an intensive care unit (ICU) stay are more likely to have long-term cognitive impairment one year after discharge from the hospital. (2018-02-26)

New way to fight sepsis: Rev up patients' immune systems
Sepsis causes about 250,000 deaths annually in the United States. Standard treatment involves high doses of antibiotics. Even if people survive the initial onslaught , they can be left with severely damaged immune systems unable to fight lingering and secondary infections. But a small clinical trial, led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has shown that a drug that revs up the immune system holds promise. (2018-03-08)

When sepsis patients face brain impairment, is gut bacteria to blame?
Halting the voyage of gut bacteria to the brain could help prevent harmful brain inflammation after a sepsis infection, a new study shows. (2018-03-07)

Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice
Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice. (2019-01-04)

Screening tools can miss sepsis in pregnancy; study urges action
A woman lies in her hospital bed. Her heart rate is elevated, she has a slight fever and an elevated white blood cell count. Could this be the beginnings of sepsis, a life-threatening reaction to an infection? Or could these simply be signs of a normal pregnancy? (2018-11-21)

Gut microbes protect against sepsis: Mouse study
Sepsis occurs when the body's response to the spread of bacteria or toxins to the bloodstream damages tissues and organs. The fight against sepsis could get a helping hand from a surprising source: gut bacteria. Researchers reporting February 22 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe found that giving mice particular microbes increased blood levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies, which protected against the kind of widespread bacterial invasion that leads to sepsis. (2018-02-22)

Collecting sperm from Covid-19 patients
How does Covid-19 affect sperm and thus the next generation´s immune system? Norwegian researchers are collecting sperm to find the answer. (2020-10-30)

Sugars in some breast milk could help protect babies from group B strep
Group B strep bacteria remain the leading cause of severe infections in newborns worldwide. Now researchers have found that although the pathogen can be transmitted to infants through breastfeeding, some mothers produce protective sugars in their milk that could help prevent infection and fight biofilm formation -- the first example of carbohydrates in human milk having this function. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

Death rate 70 percent lower at top-rated hospitals: HealthGrades annual hospital quality study
Patients have on average a 70 percent lower chance of dying at the nation's top-rated hospitals compared with the lowest-rated hospitals across 17 procedures and conditions analyzed in the eleventh annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality in America Study, issued today by HealthGrades, the leading independent healthcare ratings organization. Based on the study, HealthGrades today made available its 2009 quality ratings for all nonfederal hospitals in the country at www.healthgrades.com. (2008-10-14)

Recognize sepsis as a separate cause of illness and death
Sepsis should be recognized as a separate cause of illness and death around the world. This focus would help efforts to prevent sepsis by improving hygiene, nutrition and vaccination rates and also lead to timely treatment, better outcomes and quality of life for people with sepsis, argue researchers in a commentary in CMAJ. (2017-01-09)

Genetic variation shown in patients with severe vascular complications of infection
Major infections such as influenza and bacterial sepsis kill millions of people each year, often resulting from dangerous complications that impair the body's blood vessels. But the reasons why some patients experience these dramatic responses to infections -- and others don't -- have been unclear. Now, a research team from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center finds a key role for the Tie2 gene. (2016-02-15)

How common, preventable are sepsis-associated deaths in hospitals?
This study estimates how common sepsis-related deaths are in hospitals and how preventable those deaths might be. In a retrospective study using medical record reviews of 568 patients who died in six US hospitals or who were discharged to hospice in 2014 or 2015, sepsis was present in more than half (300) of the hospitalizations and directly caused death in more than one-third (198) of cases. (2019-02-15)

Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemia
A seven-day course of antibiotic treatment for Gram-negative bacteraemia (GNB), a serious infection that occurs when bacteria get into the bloodstream, was shown to offer similar patient outcomes as a 14-day course, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (2018-04-21)

Group B streptococcus test for pregnant women: advantage of universal screening unclear
Informative studies are still lacking for the comparison with the currently used risk-based strategy. (2019-02-05)

Majority of premature infants still exposed to early antibiotics
Most premature infants, who are at risk for sepsis but who may not have a culture confirmation of infection, continue to receive early antibiotics in the first few days of life, a finding that suggests neonatal antibiotic stewardship efforts are needed to help clinicians identify infants at lowest risk for infection to avoid unnecessary antibiotic exposure. (2018-05-25)

Premature births linked to changes in mother's bacteria
Changes to the communities of microbes living in the reproductive tract of pregnant women could help to spot those at risk of giving birth prematurely. (2018-01-23)

Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhouses
When trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection. (2018-06-11)

Immunocompromised patients with sepsis may face higher mortality at hospitals treating small numbers
Immunosuppressed patients with sepsis appear more likely to die if they are treated in a hospital caring for a relatively small number of these patients, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2018-06-01)

Microscopic revelations point to new blood infection therapies
Researchers at the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine (CSM) have for the first time been able to observe -- live and in real-time -- how the human body responds to often lethal fungal blood infections in the lung. In the study, the fungal infection Candida albicans was introduced to mice or human models of the lung vasculature and as blood was pumped over that system, researchers recorded what happened using highly sophisticated microscopes. (2018-04-04)

Rapid genetic testing can prevent hearing loss in newborns treated for sepsis
More than a million neonatal deaths worldwide each year are estimated to be due to sepsis. Many patients receive antibiotic therapy during their hospital stay, but babies with a specific genetic change can suffer irreversible hearing loss as a result. Now, a rapid test for distinguishing those infants who will have this adverse reaction to gentamicin has been developed. (2018-06-14)

Early use of antibiotics in elderly patients with UTIs associated with reduced risk of sepsis
Prescribing antibiotics immediately for elderly patients with urinary tract infections is linked with a reduced risk of sepsis and death, compared with patients who receive antibiotics in the days following diagnosis, or none at all. (2019-02-27)

Study: Biomarkers as predictive of sepsis as lengthy patient monitoring
One measurement of key biomarkers in blood that characterize sepsis can give physicians as much information as hours of monitoring symptoms, a new study found. (2017-09-07)

A rusty and sweet side of sepsis
A research team led by Miguel Soares at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC) in Portugal discovered an unsuspected mechanism that is protective against sepsis. This study that provides new avenues for therapeutic approaches against sepsis appears in the June 15 issue of the scientific journal Cell. (2017-06-15)

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