Popular Shock Waves News and Current Events

Popular Shock Waves News and Current Events, Shock Waves News Articles.
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Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry. (2019-06-20)

Sensing shakes
Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell the difference between life and death. UTokyo researchers demonstrate a new earthquake detection method -- their technique exploits subtle telltale gravitational signals traveling ahead of the tremors. Future research could boost early warning systems. (2019-03-10)

Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. The group of physicist Sebastian Huber at ETH Zurich now reports experiments in which they got a handle on one of the defining properties of Weyl fermions -- their chirality. (2019-02-11)

Older than the moon
Geochemist Matt Jackson finds that only the hottest, most buoyant mantle plumes draw from a primordial reservoir deep in the Earth. (2017-02-06)

Dazzling diamonds
Single stars are often overlooked in favor of their larger cosmic cousins -- but when they join forces, they create truly breathtaking scenes to rival even the most glowing of nebulae or swirling of galaxies. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image features the star cluster Trumpler 14. One of the largest gatherings of hot, massive and bright stars in the Milky Way, this cluster houses some of the most luminous stars in our entire galaxy. (2016-01-21)

Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient components for data storage and information processing. The physicists have published their results in the journal ''Applied Physics Letters''. (2021-02-23)

X-ray imaging with a significantly enhanced resolution
Physicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY, Hamburg) have come up with a method that could significantly improve the quality of X-ray images in comparison to conventional methods. Incoherent diffractive imaging (IDI) could help to image individual atoms in nanocrystals or molecules faster and with a much higher resolution. (2017-08-14)

WVU astronomers help detect the most massive neutron star ever measured
West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope. The neutron star, called J0740+6620, is a rapidly spinning pulsar that packs 2.17 times the mass of the sun (which is 333,000 times the mass of the Earth) into a sphere only 20-30 kilometers, or about 15 miles, across. (2019-09-16)

Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. (2019-11-05)

Brilliant burst in space reveals universe's magnetic field
Scientists have detected the brightest fast burst of radio waves in space to date -- locating the source of the event with more precision than previous efforts. (2016-11-17)

Riding the wave: Pioneering research tames nanoquakes
Researchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones. (2017-08-02)

Impact: 60 years of shock wave research at Sandia National Laboratories
Sandia National Laboratories physicists Mark Boslough and Dave Crawford predicted the Hubble Space Telescope would see a rising vapor plume as the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into the far side of Jupiter in 1994. And sure enough, the plume produced by the impact matched Sandia's computational analysis. (2019-10-21)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers
12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires. (2018-02-01)

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming
Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions. (2018-03-29)

How to put neurons into cages
Football-shaped microscale cages have been created using special laser technologies. Using sound waves as tweezers, living neurons can be placed inside these cages to study how nerve connections are being formed. (2020-05-04)

Exploring the realistic nature of the wave function in quantum mechanics
The wave function is central in quantum mechanics and describes the quantum state of microscopic objects. But what the wave function essentially represents is still in debate. Now researchers in Tsinghua University proposed and experimentally realized an encounter-delay-choice experiment to demonstrate the realistic interpretation for the wave function. This will be helpful to unlock the mysteries of the wave function, and deepen our understanding of quantum mechanics. (2018-01-04)

Light is enough to peer through a mouse skull
Having selected proper light waves, researchers have demonstrated a more than 10-fold improvement of light energy delivery to targets that are too deeply embedded to visualize with current optical imaging. Able to picture through a young mouse skull in the laboratory, this noninvasive technique does not cause any damage to tissues and does not need injections of fluorescent molecules to label the target. (2018-03-26)

MSU-based scientists described the collision of a shock wave and a 'star cradle'
A mathematician from MSU together with a Russian colleague modeled the formation of filaments (thread-like matter conglomerates) after the collision of a shock wave with molecular clouds in the interstellar space. The work will help the scientists better understand the birth of stars and star systems. The results of the study were published in Computers and Fluids magazine. (2018-03-26)

A new look at the nature of dark matter
A new study suggests that the gravitational waves detected by the LIGO experiment must have come from black holes generated during the collapse of stars, and not in the earliest phases of the Universe. (2017-03-06)

First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)

At long last, a 3D picture of an interstellar cloud, a clue to star formation
A duo of astronomers has accomplished a difficult feat: determining the 3D structure of an interstellar cloud, the birth site of stars. (2018-05-10)

Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake bays
The warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States. (2018-01-24)

COVID-19 and the decolonization of Indigenous public health
Indigenous self-determination, leadership and knowledge have helped protect Indigenous communities in Canada during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and these principles should be incorporated into public health in future, argue the authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200852. (2020-09-21)

Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides. (2019-05-08)

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together. (2018-05-08)

Potential biomarker for autism
A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder published in JNeurosci reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task. The non-invasive neuroimaging technique used in this study could be employed to detect autism symptoms as early as infancy. (2018-08-13)

The wave power farm off Mutriku could improve its efficiency
The study by the UPV/EHU's EOLO (Meteorology, Climate and Environment) research group reveals that the technology used at the farm off Mutriku -- a global pioneer in generating wave power -- needs to improve its output to be on a par with the values of other renewable energy sources, and to facilitate the marketing of its power. (2017-12-28)

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia (2018-05-17)

Danger changes how rat brain stores information
The male rat brain changes how it stores information depending on whether the environment in which it learns is safe or dangerous, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2018-01-02)

Generic mobile phone chargers escalate risk of burn, electrocution
Electric currents generated by mobile phone chargers, particularly from lower-cost generic manufacturers, are causing serious injuries. Generic mobile phone chargers are less likely to meet established safety and quality tests than the brand counterparts, according to analysis and case studies in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-07-25)

Researchers links coastal nuisance flooding to special type of slow-moving oce
A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon -- Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help (2018-07-05)

Measuring the risks of extreme temperatures on public health
Heat and cold waves affect people with certain health conditions differently, highlighting the need for tailored public service risk communication. (2018-04-13)

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-01)

NASA mission uncovers a dance of electrons in space
NASA's MMS mission studies how electrons spiral and dive around the planet in a complex dance dictated by the magnetic and electric fields, and a new study revealed a bizarre new type of motion exhibited by these electrons. (2017-05-18)

Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Knowing that there is a small chance of getting a painful electric shock can lead to significantly more stress than knowing that you will definitely be shocked. A new study found that situations in which subjects had a 50 percent chance of receiving a shock were the most stressful while 0 percent and 100 percent chances were the least stressful. People whose stress levels tracked uncertainty more closely were better at guessing whether or not they would receive a shock, suggesting that stress may inform judgments of risk. (2016-03-29)

Push to twist: Achieving the classically impossible in human-made material
Researchers have designed a metamaterial that can twist to the right or the left in response to a straight, solid push. (2017-11-23)

Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systems
The paper, titled (2018-01-12)

Brain stethoscope listens for silent seizures
By converting brain waves into sound, even non-specialists can detect 'silent seizures' -- epileptic seizures without the convulsions most of us expect. (2018-03-21)

4D-printed materials can be stiff as wood or soft as sponge
Imagine smart materials that can morph from being stiff as wood to as soft as a sponge - and also change shape. Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created flexible, lightweight materials with 4D printing that could lead to better shock absorption, morphing airplane or drone wings, soft robotics and tiny implantable biomedical devices. Their research is published in the journal Materials Horizons. (2019-03-22)

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