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Popular Signaling Pathway News and Current Events, Signaling Pathway News Articles.
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Abnormal SHP2 signaling contributes to lupus-like symptoms in mice
In this month's issue of the JCI, a research group led by Maria Kontaridis of Harvard University identifies a link between lupus and elevations in SHP2 activity. (2016-05-16)

No-mow grass may be coming to your yard soon
For anyone tethered to a lawnmower, the Holy Grail of horticultural accomplishment would be grass that never grows but is always green. (2006-05-05)

No direct flights for memory retrieval
According to new research from the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics, experiencing something and remembering it later is not a neural 'direct flight.' The pathway in the brain's hippocampus that underlies long-term memory formation contains at least one 'stopover' that is important specifically for retrieving episodic, personally experienced memories. This is in contrast to known direct memory circuits that pass through the hippocampus. This detour may be involved in quickly updating memories and responding to instinctual fears via hormonal release. (2017-08-17)

Sweet lysine degradation
The researchers from the Departments of Chemistry and Biology at the University of Konstanz have gained fundamental new insights into the degradation of the amino acid lysine -- carcinogenic oncometabolites as intermediate products (2018-11-29)

Novel strategy hits 'reset button' for disease-causing genetic duplications
Scientists at UMass Medical School have developed a strategy for editing and repairing a particular type of genetic mutation associated with microduplications using CRISPR/Cas9 and a seldom-used DNA repair pathway. Described in Nature, this approach to programmable gene editing overcomes prior inefficiencies in gene correction. (2019-04-10)

Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria
Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell. (2019-05-23)

Colorado study suggests new strategies against bone metastases from prostate cancer
University of Colorado Cancer Center study suggests a new approach, or, possibly two new approaches against prostate cancer bone metastases: While targeted therapies and anti-cancer immunotherapies have not been especially successful against primary prostate cancers, the study suggests that both these approaches may be effective against the bone metastases that grow from primary prostate cancers, and, in fact, the type of bone metastasis may dictate which targeted therapies and immunotherapies work best. (2019-12-02)

STAT3 identified as important factor in emotional reactivity
In a study published in leading journal ''Molecular Psychiatry'', MedUni Vienna researchers led by Daniela Pollak from the Division of Neurophysiology and Neuropharmacology showed that STAT3 plays an important role in the serotonergic system as a molecular mediator for controlling emotional reactivity, thereby establishing a mechanistic link between the immune system, serotonergic transmission and affective disorders such as depression. (2020-10-14)

Structure of LSD and its receptor explains its potency
Lysergic acid diethylamide -- more commonly known as 'LSD' or simply 'acid' -- is one of the longest lasting and most potent hallucinogens, but researchers have never understood why LSD's effects linger for 12 hours or more. The key to the drug's psychedelic longevity lies in how it fits into receptors in the brain, as reported in a study appearing Jan. 26 in Cell. (2017-01-26)

Researcher discovers pathway plants use to fight back against pathogens
Plants are not only smart, but they also wage a good fight, according to a University of Missouri biochemist. Previous studies have shown that plants can sense attacks by pathogens and activate their defenses. However, it has not been known what happens between the pathogen attacks and the defense activation, until now. A new MU study revealed a very complex process that explains how plants counter attack pathogens. This discovery could potentially lead to crops with enhanced disease resistance. (2008-03-31)

Clarifying the role of CHOP/GADD153 in cell death
In the May 2016 Nature Communications, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report that CHOP/GADD153-dependent apoptosis is mediated by the micro-RNA miR-216b. Previously, CHOP was known to mediate cell death but how precisely it did so remained unclear. Illuminating the pathway through which CHOP contributes to cell death provides vital information for translating new, small-molecule drugs into effective, real-world therapies by identifying biomarker targets and helping predict patient responses to treatment. (2016-05-13)

6 different pathways to adulthood
Only in very few life phases do individuals face as many life transitions in such a short time as young adults at the age of 19‒30. The transition from adolescence to adulthood is characterized by frequent changes in status or social roles, such as leaving the parental home, starting a career, entering into working life, forming a partnership and becoming a parent. (2011-03-01)

Lithium and bone healing
New molecular pathway shown in bone healing that could be enhanced by lithium treatment. (2007-07-30)

The first analysis of Ewing's sarcoma methyloma opens doors to new treatments
IDIBELL researchers describe the Ewing's sarcoma (ES) methylation profile for the first time. The methylation profile unveils the potential of the PTRF gene as a prognostic marker of the disease. The reestablishment of PTRF expression could serve as a therapeutic option in the future. (2016-12-01)

New class of drugs specifically induces cell death in B cell blood cancers
New research from The Wistar Institute shows how one protein found on the endoplasmic reticulum can serve as a target for stimulating the immune system and a more direct target for cellular death in B cell malignancies. (2016-03-10)

New strategy may help prevent kidney failure in patients with diabetes
A new strategy may help halt the progression of kidney disease in patients with diabetes. The approach, which is highlighted in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, addresses a common and serious complication of diabetes. (2016-09-08)

Why our shifty eyes don't drive us crazy
Our eyes are constantly making saccades, or little jumps. Yet the world appears to us as a smooth whole. Somehow, the brain's visual system (2006-11-08)

Potential pathway for drug intervention
A newly identified molecular pathway that directs stem cells to produce glial cells yields insights into the neurobiology of Down syndrome and a number of central nervous system disorders characterized by too many glial cells, according to a recent study by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. (2009-03-13)

Manipulating signals in bacteria could reduce illnesses
The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated. (2017-01-11)

'Busybody' protein may get on your nerves, but that's a good thing
Salk researchers find that p75 protein is vital for signaling pain in nervous system. (2017-10-17)

New colorectal cancer targeted therapy combination shows promise
New SWOG study results show significantly better outcomes for patients with a treatment-resistant form of metastatic colorectal cancer when the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib is added to a standard treatment. The findings, for the first time, point at an effective treatment for this deadly type of cancer. (2017-01-17)

Mutations that cause Parkinson's disease prevent cells from destroying defective mitochondria
Mutations that cause Parkinson's disease prevent cells from destroying defective mitochondria, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of Cell Biology. (2010-05-10)

Enzyme involved in glucose metabolism promotes wound healing, study finds
An enzyme involved in glucose metabolism in cells plays a major role in the early steps of wound healing, a finding that could lead to new therapeutic approaches for wound care, according to researchers at Georgia State University. (2016-03-10)

Bleed like hell
A team of scientists, led by physicists of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, discovered the mechanism of the platelet programmed cell death, resulting in acceleration of the blood coagulation process by a factor of 1,000 to 10,000. The study is published in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. (2016-08-09)

Scientists consider climate change-resistant crops
Meng Chen and his team identified the genetic mechanism used by all plants as they respond to daylight conditions as well as the ability to sense temperature. 'To cope with rapid temperature changes associated with global warming, we may have to help nature to evolve crops to adapt to the new environment,' Chen said. (2018-12-04)

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer harboring certain BRAF mutations may respond to anti-EGFR
Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer harboring a subset of non-V600 mutations in the BRAF gene, known as class 3 BRAF mutations, were more likely to respond to anti-EGFR treatment. (2019-09-12)

WSU study shows insulin can increase mosquitoes' immunity to West Nile virus
A discovery by a Washington State University-led research team has the potential to inhibit the spread of West Nile virus as well as Zika and dengue viruses. The researchers demonstrated that mammalian insulin activated an antiviral immunity pathway in mosquitoes, increasing the insects' ability to suppress the viruses. Since mosquito bites are the most common way humans are infected with West Nile, stopping the virus among the insects would protect human health. (2019-11-12)

One-two punch drug combination offers hope for pancreatic cancer therapy
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified a combination of two anti-cancer compounds that shrank pancreatic tumors in mice -- supporting the immediate evaluation of the drugs in a clinical trial. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved versions of the compounds are used today to treat certain leukemias and solid tumors, including melanoma. The study was published in Nature Cell Biology. (2019-11-18)

MDC cancer researchers identify new function in an old acquaintance
Cells have two different programs to safeguard them from developing cancer. One of them is senescence. It puts cancer cells into a permanent sleep. Now researchers of the Max Delbrück Center have discovered that an enzyme known to be active in breast cancer blocks this protection program and boosts tumor growth. They succeeded in blocking this enzyme in mice with breast cancer, thus reactivating senescence and stopping tumor growth. (2015-03-16)

New clues to breast cancer development in high-risk women
Physicians who treat women with the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 often remove their patients' ovaries to eliminate the source of estrogen they believe fuels cancer growth. Yet they also know that anti-estrogen therapies don't work to treat breast or ovarian cancer that might develop. That paradox has led scientists to question exactly how, or if, estrogen is involved in cancer development and whether removal of ovaries makes sense. (2007-09-11)

Rare, deadly lymphoma demystified
This is the first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (2015-04-14)

Immunity in social amoeba suggests ancient beginnings
Finding an immune system in the social amoeba (Dictyostelium discoideum) is not only surprising but it also may prove a clue as to what is necessary for an organism to become multicellular, said the Baylor College of Medicine researcher who led the research that appears today in the journal Science. (2007-08-02)

Scientists uncover key new molecules that could help to tackle tooth loss and regeneration
New research published in the Journal of Dental Research has shed light on the science behind the formation of the periodontal ligament, which helps keep the tooth stable in the jawbone. This improved understanding will help scientists work towards regenerating the tissues that support teeth. This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in rodent teeth and human cells. (2019-08-30)

A new way to control microbial metabolism
To help optimize microbes' ability to produce useful compounds but also maintain their own growth, MIT chemical engineers have devised a way to induce bacteria to switch between different metabolic pathways at different times. (2019-12-02)

New MIT tool probes brain circuits
Researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT report in the Jan. 24 online edition of Science that they have created a way to see, for the first time, the effect of blocking and unblocking a single neural circuit in a living animal. (2008-01-24)

Flipping the switch on itch
Researchers have pinpointed a particular neuropeptide associated with transmitting itch signals in mice with atopic dermatitis. The work sheds further light on the pathways involved in transmitting itch sensations from the peripheral (skin) to the central (spinal cord) nervous system. (2018-06-13)

Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their 3-dimensional body
Zoologist shows that beetles, bugs and crickets control their body shape through Fog signalling / publication in 'eLife'. (2019-10-21)

How the immune system becomes blind to cancer cells
Researchers have described the activation of a key protein used by tumor cells to stop the body's immune response. (2020-01-31)

Yin and Yang: Two signaling molecules control growth and behavior in bacteria
Bacteria are considered to be true experts in survival. Their rapid adaptive response to changing environmental conditions is based, among other things, on two competing signaling molecules. As the 'Yin and Yang' of metabolic control they decide on the lifestyle of bacteria, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel. The new findings also play a role in the context of bacterial infections. (2020-11-09)

New research points toward mechanism of age-onset toxicity of Alzheimer's protein
Like most neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease usually appears late in life, raising the question of whether it is a disastrous consequence of aging or if the toxic protein aggregates that cause the disease simply take a long time to form. Now, a new study shows that aging is what's critical. Harmful beta amyloid aggregates accumulate when aging impedes two molecular clean-up crews from getting rid of these toxic species. (2006-08-10)

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