Popular Silicon News and Current Events

Popular Silicon News and Current Events, Silicon News Articles.
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Beat the heat
University of Utah mechanical engineering associate professor Mathieu Francoeur has discovered a way to produce more electricity from heat than thought possible by creating a silicon chip, also known as a 'device,' that converts more thermal radiation into electricity. This could lead to devices such as laptop computers and cellphones with much longer battery life and solar panels that are much more efficient at converting radiant heat to energy. (2019-07-10)

NIST chip lights up optical neural network demo
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks. (2018-07-26)

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field
Scientists at the Earth-Life Science Institute at the Tokyo Institute of Technology report in Nature (Fen. 22, 2017) unexpected discoveries about the Earth's core. The findings include insights into the source of energy driving the Earth's magnetic field, factors governing the cooling of the core and its chemical composition, and conditions that existed during the formation of the Earth. (2017-02-22)

Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers. (2019-03-29)

UNIST researchers develop silicon chip-based quantum photonic devices
An international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented a core technology for quantum photonic devices used in quantum information processing. Their work has been published in the November issue of the prestigious journal, Nano Letters. (2017-12-12)

Just add water
Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors (2019-09-16)

Winds blowing off a dying star
Using ALMA, Japanese scientists explain why aluminum oxide is so abundant around AGB stars. (2017-11-10)

Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructures
From textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system. (2017-11-08)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

With a simple coating, nanowires show a dramatic increase in efficiency and sensitivity
By applying a coating to individual silicon nanowires, researchers at Harvard and Berkeley have significantly improved the materials' efficiency and sensitivity. (2011-07-06)

Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created. (2018-07-23)

Scientists demonstrated 1.3 μm submilliamp threshold quantum dot micro-lasers on Si
A group of researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and University of California, Santa Barbara, successfully demonstrated record-small electrically pumped micro-lasers epitaxially grown on industry standard (001) silicon substrates in a recent study. A submilliamp threshold of 0.6 mA, emitting at the near-infrared (1.3?m) was achieved for a micro-laser with a radius of 5 μm. The thresholds and footprints are orders of magnitude smaller than those previously reported lasers epitaxially grown on Si. (2017-09-18)

The ultimate green technology
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry. A team of scientists in Edmonton, Canada has done just that, led by a world-renowned physicist and his up-and-coming protégé. (2017-02-13)

Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets -- an alternative to graphene
Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors. (2017-03-08)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

Trying to listen to the signal from neurons
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a coaxial cable-inspired needle-electrode. The microscale coaxial needle-electrode has two electrodes in the needle, enabling differential recordings to be made at very close distances. The microscale electrode reduces tissue damage compared to conventional electrodes. These advantages of the coaxial electrode enable high-quality recording of neuronal signals and it is expected that the coaxial needle-electrode can be used as a new way of electrophysiology in the field of neuroscience. (2020-07-29)

TU Wien develops new semiconductor processing technology
Extremely fine porous structures with tiny holes -- resembling a kind of sponge at nano level -- can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components. There have already been experiments in this area with porous structures made from silicon. Now, researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in developing a method for the controlled manufacture of porous silicon carbide. (2018-01-22)

Metal-organic compounds produces new class of glass
Lightning and volcanos both produce glass, and humans have been making glass from silicon dioxide since prehistory. Industrialization brought us boron-based glasses, polymer glasses and metallic glasses, but now an international team of researchers has developed a new family of glass based on metals and organic compounds that stacks up to the original silica in glass-forming ability. (2018-03-09)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

New sensor for measuring electric field strength
Standard Sensors for measuring electrical fields have one big problem: they usually distort the electric field they are supposed to measure. The problem gets worse if the sensor has to be grounded to provide a reference point. The new sensor developed in Vienna works in a different way. Two tiny silicon structures are displaced relative to each other, their movement is measured with light. (2018-01-24)

Obtaining of silicon nanowires becomes eco-friendly
Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, the Lomonosov Moscow State University have devised a technique of silicon nanowires synthesis. They have managed to do this with the help of metal-assisted etching, where safer and more eco-friendly ammonium fluoride is used instead of hydrofluoric acid. The research results have been published in Nanoscale Research Letters journal. (2016-10-18)

Guanidinium stabilizes perovskite solar cells at 19 percent efficiency
Incorporating guanidinium into perovskite solar cells stabilizes their efficiency at 19 percent for 1,000 hours under full-sunlight testing conditions. The study, carried out by EPFL, is published in Nature Energy. (2017-12-08)

Bright future for solar cell technology
New all-inorganic perovskite solar cells tackle three key challenges in solar cell technology: efficiency, stability, and cost. (2018-04-27)

Printable solar cells just got a little closer
A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator. (2017-02-16)

Sharpening the X-ray view of the nanocosm
A novel lens offers scientists the sharpest X-ray images yet from the nano world. The device is made from alternating layers of tungsten carbide and silicon carbide and can focus hard X-rays into a spot of less than ten nanometers in diameter as a team lead by Saša Bajt from the German research center Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY report in Light: Science and Applications, a journal of the Nature Publishing Group. (2018-03-23)

An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favorite mobile game
Researchers from the Tokyo-based company Silicon Studio, led by Spanish data scientist África Periáñez, have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. This information is useful for game studios so that they can design strategies to maintain the player's interest. (2017-03-23)

A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide, they selectively etch silicon out of titanium silicon carbide, a cheaper and more common precursor, to synthesize titanium carbide. (2018-04-04)

The scientists from MSU developed a basis for highly sensitive gas sensors
A team from the Faculty of Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University suggested using porous silicon nanowire arrays in highly sensitive gas sensors. These devices will be able to detect the presence of toxic and non-toxic gas molecules in the air at room temperature. The results of the study were published in Physica Status Solidi A: Applications and Materials Science journal. (2017-12-26)

Physicists reveal material for high-speed quantum internet
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have 'rediscovered' a material that can lay the foundation for ultrahigh-speed quantum internet. Their paper published in npj Quantum Information shows how to increase the data transfer rate in unconditionally secure quantum communication lines to more than 1 gigabit per second, making quantum internet as fast as its classical counterpart. (2018-03-21)

Illuminating the future of renewable energy
A new chemical compound created by researchers at West Virginia University is lighting the way for renewable energy. (2020-04-13)

The dawn of gallium oxide microelectronics
Pushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density, and transparent conductive oxides are a key emerging material, offering the unlikely combination of conductivity and transparency over the visual spectrum. One conductive oxide has unique properties that allow it to function well in power switching: gallium oxide, a material with an incredibly large bandgap. In this week's Applied Physics Letters, researchers outline a case for producing microelectronics using gallium oxide. (2018-02-06)

Making the switch to polarization diversity
New silicon photonic chip that offers significant improvement to the optical switches used by fiber optic networks to be presented at OFC 2017 in Los Angeles. (2017-01-31)

The sharpest laser in the world
With a linewidth of only 10 mHz, the laser that the researchers from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now developed together with US researchers from JILA, a joint institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado Boulder, has established a new world record. The results have been published in the current issue of Physical Review Letters. (2017-06-29)

Silicon nanoblock arrays create vivid colors with subwavelength resolution
Osaka University researchers demonstrated a range of highly tunable vivid color pixels controlled by the geometry of a monocrystalline silicon metamaterial surface. The pixels created showed dual-color response dependent on the polarization of the light source, as well as subwavelength resolution. These materials have potential applications in high-resolution printing, particularly for anti-counterfeiting technology. They could also be used for optical data storage and three-dimensional displays. (2018-01-25)

Diamond-based circuits can take the heat for advanced applications
When power generators transfer electricity, they lose almost 10 percent of the generated power. To address this, scientists are researching new diamond semiconductor circuits to make power conversion systems more efficient. Researchers in Japan successfully fabricated a key circuit in power conversion systems using hydrogenated diamond. These circuits can be used in diamond-based electronic devices that are smaller, lighter and more efficient than silicon-based devices. They report their findings in this week's Applied Physics Letters. (2018-04-10)

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closer
Flexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor created by researchers at The University of Manchester and Shandong University in China. (2018-04-18)

Making batteries from waste glass bottles
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have used waste glass bottles and a low-cost chemical process to create nanosilicon anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and provide more power with fewer charges to personal electronics like cell phones and laptops. (2017-04-19)

Mass production of new class of semiconductors closer to reality
Two Waterloo chemists have made it easier for manufacturers to produce a new class of faster and cheaper semiconductors. (2018-02-09)

Monocrystalline silicon thin film for cost-cutting solar cells with 10-times faster growth rate fabricated
A research team from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Waseda University have successfully produced high-quality thin film monocrystalline silicon with a reduced crystal defect density down to the silicon wafer level at a growth rate that is more than 10 times higher than before. In principle, this method can improve the raw material yield to nearly 100%. (2018-03-16)

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