Popular Small Intestine News and Current Events

Popular Small Intestine News and Current Events, Small Intestine News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Hopping bacteria
Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed. A new study from Princeton University illuminates precise behavior patterns of E. coli and corrects a longstanding error in predicting their behavior. (2019-05-06)

Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. The results of the international study may contribute to the development of new therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They have been published in the journal Nature Immunology. (2019-02-26)

Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (2019-02-06)

Genetic polymorphisms and zinc status
Zinc is an essential component for all living organisms, representing the second most abundant trace element, after iron. This element is widely distributed in the tissues of a human body where it is involved in normal growth, reproduction and several biological functions including immunity, energy metabolism and antioxidant processes. (2018-12-27)

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy. (2019-09-18)

New stem-cell findings can help the body to cure itself
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified an important mechanism that regulates how many new cells are produced by each intestinal stem cell. The study is published in the latest issue of the prestigious scientific journal, Cell. (2006-06-16)

Robotic implants spur tissue regeneration inside the body
An implanted, programmable medical robot can gradually lengthen tubular organs by applying traction forces -- stimulating tissue growth in stunted organs without interfering with organ function or causing apparent discomfort, report researchers at Boston Children's Hospital. (2018-01-10)

Additional therapy after surgical removal of rare tumors may not increase survival
Results of an analysis from the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine show that additional therapy, or adjuvant therapy, delivered after surgical removal of a rare type of gastrointestinal tumor does not increase survival rates for patients. (2018-03-24)

ASGE encourages patients to speak to their doctor about colorectal cancer screening options
Results of the National CT Colonography Trial, published in the Sept. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, show improvements in the technology's ability to diagnose intermediate- to large-sized polyps in the colon, but this method of testing is not as effective in diagnosing small polyps. CT colonography is one of several colorectal cancer screening options. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy encourages patients to speak to their doctor about the screening method that is best for them. (2008-09-17)

Parasitic worms need their intestinal microflora too
Scientists at The University of Manchester have cast new light on a little understood group of worm infections, which collectively afflicts 1 in 4 people, mainly children -- in the developing the world. (2018-03-14)

Gut cells are gatekeepers of infectious brain diseases, study finds
Fresh insights into infectious brain conditions help to explain why some people -- and animals -- are more at risk than others. (2016-12-14)

Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study finds
Consumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-22)

Black tea may help with weight loss, too
UCLA researchers have demonstrated for the first time that black tea may promote weight loss and other health benefits by changing bacteria in the gut. (2017-10-04)

Europe's most common genetic disease is a liver disorder
The exact origin of the genetic iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis has remained elusive. In a joint effort, researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory and the University of Heidelberg, Germany, have now discovered that HH is a liver disease. (2008-02-06)

Tracking down T cell targets to tamp down HIV infection
Scientists have narrowed in on a group of gut-residing immune cells that might predispose women to increased HIV infection risk and more severe disease. (2018-01-24)

Gut reaction: Repeated food poisoning triggers chronic disease
Small bacterial infections that may go unnoticed and which the body easily clears without treatment, such as occurs during mild food poisoning, nevertheless can start a chain of events that leads to chronic inflammation and potentially life-threatening colitis. (2017-12-21)

CD4 T cells, xenobiotic transporters, and metabolites in inflammatory bowel diseases
Few studies have investigated the interaction between intestinal T cells with metabolites. Researchers have now shown in mice CD4+ T effector (Teff) cells upregulate the protein Mdr1 in the ileum to maintain homeostasis in the presence of the metabolite bile acid. Mice lacking Mdr1 display mucosal dysfunction and induce Crohn's disease-like ileitis. Their findings suggest that T cell adaptation to enterohepatic bile acid circulation in the ileum safeguards intestinal homeostasis. (2017-12-26)

Your gut has taste receptors
Researchers in the Department of Neuroscience at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have identified taste receptors in the human intestines. The taste receptor T1R3 and the taste G protein gustducin are critical to sweet taste in the tongue. Research now shows these two sweet-sensing proteins are also expressed in specialized taste cells of the gut where they sense glucose within the intestine. (2007-08-20)

A gut bacterium's guide to building a microbiome
Many studies have linked the gut microbiome to health and disease. New research from Caltech reveals mechanisms utilized by gut bacteria to assemble a microbiome in the first place. (2018-05-04)

Mouse study reveals what happens in the gut after too much fructose
Princeton University researchers report that in mice, fructose, a sugar found in fruit, is processed mainly in the small intestine, not in the liver as had previously been suspected. Sugary drinks and processed high-sugar foods overwhelm the small intestine and spill into the liver for processing. Additionally, the authors learned that the ability of the small intestine to process fructose is higher after a meal. The work appears Feb. 6 in the journal Cell Metabolism. (2018-02-06)

Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach
A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful bacteria in the gut. Such a treatment could improve the digestive health of billions of people worldwide who contract H. pylori infections. The antimicrobial agent morphs into a bacterial hole-puncher in the stomach's acidic environment and reverts to an amorphous, inactive structure when it reaches the higher pH environment of the small intestine. (2017-11-14)

Looking for an off switch for celiac disease
New research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry identifies an enzyme that turns off transglutaminase 2, potentially paving the way for new treatments for celiac disease. (2018-02-23)

Study identifies double-balloon enteroscopy as cost-effective approach for obscure GI bleeding
A cost-effectiveness analysis conducted by researchers at Stanford University Hospital in Calif., shows that an initial double-balloon enteroscopy is a cost-effective approach for patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, capsule-directed DBE, which is when the findings from an initial small bowel capsule endoscopy exam are used to guide the DBE procedure, may be preferred as the initial test due to the potential for fewer complications and decreased utilization of endoscopic resources. (2008-11-24)

Which pain medication is safest for arthritis patients?
In a recent Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study, arthritis patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain plus a stomach acid-reducing medicine called esomeprazole had infrequent gastrointestinal side effects. (2018-04-19)

Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen. (2017-03-29)

State's first single incision robotic kidney removal
For the first time in Michigan, a diseased kidney has been surgically removed at Henry Ford Hospital using highly sophisticated 3-D robotics through a single incision. (2008-08-25)

Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it
The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion. These very bacteria were also found in the Iceman, who lived 5300 years ago, and are still present in non-Westernized populations in various parts of the world. The depletion of the microbiome may be associated with the increased prevalence, in Western countries, of complex conditions like allergies, autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity. (2019-10-18)

Obesity inhibits key cancer defense mechanism
Obesity could enhance cancer development while aspirin might prevent it -- a new insight into potential targets for cancer prevention. (2018-04-26)

Fungus from the intestinal mucosa can affect lung health
Writing in the journal Cell, a research team from Cologne and Kiel describes the mechanism of 'immune cross-reactivity'. The immune system's reaction to Candida albicans in the intestine seems to amplify pathogenic immune processes in the lungs. In consequence, immune-compromised individuals may be at higher risk of health deterioration. (2019-02-22)

Nanotechnology delivers hepatitis B vaccine
X-ray imaging shows that nanostructured silica acts as a protective vehicle to deliver intact antigen to the intestine so that it can trigger an immune response. The material can give rise to a polyvaccine against six diseases. (2019-07-11)

Mount Sinai research discovers possible link between Crohn's & Parkinson's in Jewish population
Findings could lead to new treatments and early diagnosis. (2018-01-11)

Study links gastric bypass surgery to increased risk of kidney stones
Morbidly obese patients who undergo a particular type of gastric bypass surgery called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are at an increased risk of developing kidney stones -- small, pebble-like deposits that can result in severe pain and require an operation to remove them -- earlier than previously thought. (2008-06-26)

Prebiotic potential of almonds
Recently published work by the Institute of Food Research has identified potential prebiotic properties of almonds that could help improve our digestive health by increasing levels of beneficial gut bacteria. (2008-06-27)

Morbid obesity: Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy are comparable
In Switzerland, 5,500 operations to combat morbid obesity are conducted every year. Gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy operations perform similarly: patients lose two-thirds of their excess weight in the long term, as researchers from the University of Basel at the St. Claraspital report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). When it comes to gastric acid reflux, the bypass clearly shows better results. (2018-01-17)

ILCregs play an important role in regulation of intestinal inflammation
Researchers from FAN Zusen's group at the Institute of Biophysics (IBP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have identified a regulatory subpopulation of ILCs (called ILCregs) that exist in the gut and harbor a unique genetic identity distinct from ILCs or regulatory T cells (Tregs). (2017-08-24)

The colon of patients with IBS reacts differently to bacteria
The intestinal barrier of patients with the gastrointestinal disease IBS allows bacteria to pass more freely than in healthy people, according to a study led by researchers at Linköping University in Sweden. The study, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, is the first to investigate IBS using living bacteria. (2017-09-06)

Use of quality improvement strategies among US primary care practices
Small- to medium-sized practices with quality improvement systems (e.g., registries) are most likely to use quality improvement strategies. Practices with fewer major disruptions are more likely to use quality improvement strategies to improve cardiovascular preventive services. (2018-04-09)

Gut bacteria: It can be good, and bad, for health
A new study found that impairing a rare group of cells (called Paneth cells) in the small intestine allows gut bacteria to invade the organ and cause major inflammation. The study was conducted in mice, but has implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a group of disorders characterized by chronic inflammation in the digestive track. (2018-02-08)

New type of diabetes caused by a genetic mutation
Scientists from the ULB Center for Diabetes Research and the Erasmus Hospital of the ULB, together with colleagues at the University of Exeter (UK), University of Helsinki (Finland) and Kyoto University (Japan), have identified a new type of diabetes caused by a mutation in the gene RFX6. (2017-10-12)

Cells pumping iron to prevent anemia
Researchers identify the gene Regnase-1 as a regulator for iron metabolism by degrading Transferrin Receptor 1 (TfR1) mRNA. (2017-05-29)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.