Popular Snake News and Current Events

Popular Snake News and Current Events, Snake News Articles.
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Project Hotspot
In their study published in Lithosphere this week, James Kessler and colleagues examine the geology of a scientific borehole drilled into the Snake River Plain, Idaho, USA, to investigate the potential for geothermal energy at depth. The site discussed in this paper is on the Mountain Home Air Force Base, where a drillhole in 1984 indicated that geothermal fluids were present at about 1.8 km depth. (2017-04-05)

Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. Nagoya University researchers found in eight tetrapod species that the position of the sacral vertebrae and the hindlimbs is determined by the initiation timing of Gdf11 gene expression. This will contribute to a forthcoming model explaining the coupling of spine and hindlimb positioning - a major step in fully understanding tetrapod evolution. (2017-08-18)

Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat
New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The study shows that the snake fungal disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophidiodiicola can infect snakes of many species regardless of their ancestry, physical characteristics, or habitats. The study's authors warn that future surveys for the disease should assume that all snake species harbor this pathogen. (2017-12-20)

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature. (2018-03-14)

Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Knowing that there is a small chance of getting a painful electric shock can lead to significantly more stress than knowing that you will definitely be shocked. A new study found that situations in which subjects had a 50 percent chance of receiving a shock were the most stressful while 0 percent and 100 percent chances were the least stressful. People whose stress levels tracked uncertainty more closely were better at guessing whether or not they would receive a shock, suggesting that stress may inform judgments of risk. (2016-03-29)

New World Health Organization strategy aims to halve the global impact of snakebite
New strategy aims to ensure safe, effective and affordable treatment for all; empower communities at all levels to take proactive action; strengthen health systems to deliver better outcomes; build a global coalition of partners to coordinate action and mobilise resources. (2019-02-22)

Western states to host first test of carbon sequestration in lava rock
Along with researchers from three Idaho universities, geologists from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls will test how well the volcanic rocks abundant below the Columbia and Snake river plains store carbon dioxide. Researchers from INL, the University of Idaho, the Boise State University, the Idaho State University in Pocatello and the Battelle Pacific Northwest Division in Richland, Wash., are now making preparations to inject the gas into the subterranean volcanic basalt rock and monitor whether the rock can hold it. (2005-11-04)

Researchers chart dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon
Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, Washington State University researchers have found. The researchers reached this conclusion after extracting DNA from scores of bone samples -- some harvested as many as 7,000 years ago -- and comparing them to the DNA of Chinook currently swimming in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The work is 'the first direct measure of reduced genetic diversity for Chinook salmon from the ancient to the contemporary period.' (2018-01-10)

Listening to data could be the best way to track salmon migration
Sound could be the key to understanding ecological data: in a new study in Heliyon, researchers have turned chemical data that shows salmon migration patterns into sound, helping people hear when they move towards the ocean from one river to another. The approach - called sonification - enables even untrained listeners to interpret large amounts of complex data, providing an easier way to interpret (2018-02-21)

A 'transitional fossil' debunked
Snakes are a very diverse group of present-day reptiles, with nearly 3,600 known species. They are readily recognized by their long bodies and lack of limbs. The origin of snakes from lizard-like precursors with paired limbs has long been a controversial subject. (2016-10-28)

Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study finds
Clusters of holes may be evolutionarily indicative of contamination and disease -- visual cues for rotten or moldy food or skin marred by an infection. (2018-01-04)

Snacking snakes act as 'ecosystem engineers' in seed dispersal
Despite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. New research reveals that snakes might even play a key role in dispersing plant seeds. (2018-02-08)

How do snakes eat live crabs? By being finicky diners
University of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne found that three species of Asian water snake use different strategies to prey on similar food resources. (2018-03-27)

Disappearing sea snakes surprise researchers with hidden genetic diversity
New research suggests an urgent need to find out why sea snakes are disappearing from known habitats, after it was discovered some seemingly identical sea snake populations are actually genetically distinct. (2017-12-07)

Sea snakes that can't drink seawater
New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall. (2019-02-08)

World's smallest snake found in Barbados
The world's smallest species of snake has been discovered on the Caribbean island of Barbados. The species -- which is as thin as a spaghetti noodle and small enough to rest comfortably on a U.S. quarter --was discovered by Blair Hedges, an evolutionary biologist at Penn State. Hedges and his colleagues also are the discoverers of the world's smallest frog and lizard species, which too were found on Caribbean islands. (2008-08-03)

Fossil holds new insights into how fish evolved onto land
The fossil of an early snake-like animal -- called Lethiscus stocki -- has kept its evolutionary secrets for the last 340-million years. Now, an international team of researchers, led by the University of Calgary, has revealed new insights into the ancient Scottish fossil that dramatically challenge our understanding of the early evolution of tetrapods, or four-limbed animals with backbones. (2017-06-21)

Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight line
University of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne studied the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel. His study titled 'Crawling without Wiggling' was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (2018-01-12)

Towards an unconscious neural reinforcement intervention for common fears
In a collaboration between researchers based Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Japan, and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scientists have moved one major step towards the development of a novel form of brain-based treatment for phobia that may soon be applicable to patients (2018-03-06)

Visualizing danger from songbird warning calls
Kyoto University researcher finds that a small songbird, the Japanese tit (Parus minor), can retrieve a visual image of a predator from specific alarm calls. (2018-01-29)

How do birds understand 'foreign' calls?
New research from Kyoto University show that the coal tit (Periparus ater) can eavesdrop and react to the predatory warning calls of the Japanese tit (Parus minor) and evokes a visual image of the predator in their mind (2020-05-19)

The origin of snakes -- new evolutionary scenario presented
The early evolution of snakes happened from surface-terrestrial to burrowing in the lizard-snake transition suggests a research group at the University of Helsinki. (2018-01-25)

A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key in curing cirrhosis
The unique liver function of a South American amphibian, Siphonops annulatus, could pave the way to finding a cure to the devastating liver condition cirrhosis, a new study published in the prestigious Journal of Anatomy reports. (2017-12-06)

Do low-carb diets really do anything? (video)
Some fads never die. Low-carb diets were a thing in the late 90s and they're still a thing now. But why does this fad have staying power? Is it because the touted benefits are real? Or is that greasy, low-carb burger fried in snake oil? Learn about the surprising medical benefits of ketogenic diets in this video from Reactions. (2018-01-23)

What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?
If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake. That's the theory driving the research of Hisham Abdel-Aal, PhD, an associate teaching professor from Drexel University's College of Engineering who is studying snake skin to help engineers improve the design of textured surfaces, such as engine cylinder liners, prosthetic joints - and yes, maybe even footwear. (2018-05-21)

When it rains, snake bites soar
Rattlesnakes and other venomous reptiles may bite more people during rainy years than in seasons wracked by drought, a new study shows. (2018-09-05)

High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack
Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes -- venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes. Research by a student-led team from UC Riverside, San Diego State University, and UC Davis now shows that desert kangaroo rats frequently foil snakes through a combination of fast reaction times, powerful evasive leaps, and mid-air, ninja-style kicks. (2019-03-27)

Common US snake actually 3 different species
New research reveals that a snake found across a huge swath of the Eastern United States is actually three different species. Published in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, analyses of the yellow-bellied kingsnake (Lampropeltis calligaster) also indicate that diversification of the snake -- and possibly of many other vertebrates living on both sides of the Mississippi River -- is influenced not by the river itself, as predominately thought, but by the different ecological environments on each side. (2016-10-05)

Illusory motion reproduced by deep neural networks trained for prediction
a research team led by associate professor Eiji Watanabe of the National Institute for Basic Biology successfully reproduced illusory motion by deep neural networks trained for prediction. (2018-03-20)

Why cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite
Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, and the reasons behind this strange phenomenon have been revealed by University of Queensland research. The research team, led by Ph.D. student Christina Zdenek and Associate Professor Bryan Fry, compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends. (2020-05-18)

Naming rights for five new snail-sucking snake species auctioned to save forests in Ecuador
Five new species of eye-catching snakes with curious eating habits were found to inhabit forests in Ecuador. With four of them already deemed at risk of extinction, the international research team decided to auction their naming rights and use the money to purchase and save the previously unprotected plot of land where some of these species dwell. Their study is published in the open access journal ZooKeys. (2018-06-14)

Research explains how snakes lost their limbs
The study is part of an effort to understand how changes in the genome lead to changes in phenotypes. (2019-02-06)

Rattlesnake venom: Mild, medium and wicked hot
In a surprising evolutionary twist, a new study suggests that while one rattlesnake may routinely feast on lizard meat, its seemingly identical neighbor snake might strike and strike and never kill its would-be reptilian prey. (2019-02-05)

Discovered: A quick and easy way to shut down instabilities in fusion devices
This article describes suppression of instabilities with new neutral beam injector. (2017-08-18)

Why tiger snakes are on a winner
Australian tiger snakes have 'hit the jackpot' because prey cannot evolve resistance to their venom. While that may sound foreboding, University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences expert Associate Professor Bryan Fry said this discovery had medical benefit for humans. (2017-08-21)

Researchers at LSTM take a novel approach to snakebite treatment
Researchers at LSTM's Alistair Reid Venom Research Unit are looking at treatment for snakebite in a completely different way and have shown that it is possible to treat the bite from one snake with antivenom produced from a completely different species that causes the same pathology in humans. (2018-04-19)

New insights may help protect against snake venom toxicity
New research may be useful for protecting against the toxic effects of snake venom. (2017-04-20)

New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa
During surveys in the Upper Guinea forest zone of Liberia and Guinea, scientists discovered snakes later identified as a new to science species. It belongs to the stiletto snakes, spectacular for their unusual skulls, allowing them to stab sideways with a fang sticking out of the corner of their mouths. The discovery, published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, is further evidence supporting the status of the region as unique in its biodiversity. (2019-03-11)

The anatomy of a cosmic snake reveals the structure of distant galaxies
We have a fair understanding of star formation, from the interstellar matter to the diffuse clouds whose gravitational contraction gives birth to stars. But observations of distant galaxies have questioned this picture, the size and mass of these distant stellar nurseries exceeding that of their local counterparts. Astrophysicists from the universities of Geneva and Zurich have tackled this inconsistency and found the first answers thanks to the observation of the cosmic snake. (2017-11-13)

Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues
Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world. (2019-02-25)

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