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Next-gen solar cells spin in new direction
A nanomaterial made from phosphorus, known as phosphorene, is shaping up as a key ingredient for more sustainable and efficient next-generation perovskite solar cells. (2019-06-21)
Blood supply therapy bid boosted by fresh insights into key cells
Therapies to improve recovery after a heart attack could be developed following fresh insights into how key cells are formed. (2019-06-26)
NYU Abu Dhabi researcher discovers exoplanets can be made less habitable by stars' flares
In this new study, NYUAD Center for Space Science Research Scientist Dimitra Atri found that not all exoplanets in habitable zones will be able to maintain hospitable conditions for life. (2019-12-15)
Stanford solar physicist finds new way to study the inner workings of the sun
Neutrinos from the sun carry information about its fiery core but they are extremely hard to detect. (2016-11-10)
NREL reports examine economic trade-offs of owning versus leasing a solar photovoltaic system
Two new reports from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examine the economic options customers face when deciding how to finance commercial or residential solar energy systems. (2015-01-27)
ORNL optimizes formula for cadmium-tellurium solar cells
Solar cells could move closer to theoretical levels of efficiency because of findings by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (2016-08-03)
Dawn spacecraft at Ceres: Craters, cracks, and cryovolcanos
Six studies highlight new and unexpected insights into Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest object in the asteroid belt (between Mars and Jupiter). (2016-09-01)
Chaos in cosmos: Stars with three planet-forming discs of gas
A star with a ring of planets orbiting around it - that is the picture we know from our own solar system and from many of the thousands of exoplanets observed in recent years. (2016-10-11)
Special coating greatly improves solar cell performance
Current-generation solar cell technologies are too expensive and inefficient for wide-scale commercial applications. (2008-02-22)
Ovarian cancer cells hijack surrounding tissues to enhance tumor growth
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center report that ovarian cancer cells activate the HOXA9 gene to compel stromal cells to create an environment that supports tumor growth. (2012-09-04)
Simple processing technique could cut cost of organic PV and wearable electronics
A simple solution-based electrical doping technique could help reduce the cost of polymer solar cells and organic electronic devices, potentially expanding the applications for these technologies. (2016-12-05)
Researchers propose low-mass supernova triggered formation of solar system
A research team led by University of Minnesota School of Physics and Astronomy Professor Yong-Zhong Qian uses new models and evidence from meteorites to show that a low-mass supernova triggered the formation of our solar system. (2016-11-28)
Hubble hones in on a hypergiant's home
This beautiful Hubble image reveals a young super star cluster known as Westerlund 1, only 15,000 light-years away in our Milky Way neighborhood, yet home to one of the largest stars ever discovered. (2017-03-10)
The moon is front and center during a total solar eclipse
In the lead-up to a total solar eclipse, most of the attention is on the sun, but Earth's moon also has a starring role. (2017-07-21)
VLA detects possible extrasolar planetary-mass magnetic powerhouse
Astronomers have used the VLA to detect a possible planetary-mass object with a surprisingly powerful magnetic field some 20 light-years from Earth. (2018-08-02)
Scientists discover novel process to convert visible light into infrared light
Columbia and Harvard scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. (2019-01-16)
New light shed on intensely studied material
The organic polymer PEDOT is probably one of the world's most intensely studied materials. (2019-01-17)
Light-based production of drug-discovery molecules
EPFL chemists have developed a light-based chemical method for cheap and simple production of chemical molecules used in drug discovery, such as muscle relaxants and antimicrobials. (2019-02-18)
Beyond the bulkheterojunction
Bulkheterojunctions (blended junctions) are indispensable for organic solar cells. However, the fabrication of electron and hole transport routes in bulkheterojunction remains quite challenging. (2019-02-19)
More support for Planet Nine
Mike Brown and Konstantin Batygin offer further clues about Planet Nine. (2019-02-27)
Making solar cells is like buttering bread
Formamidinium lead iodide is a very good material for photovoltaic cells, but getting the correct and stable crystal structure is a challenge. (2019-03-21)
100% renewables doesn't equal zero-carbon energy, and the difference is growing
While 160 companies around the world have committed to use '100% renewable energy,' that does not mean '100% carbon-free energy.' The difference will grow as power grids become less reliant on fossil power, according to a new Stanford study. (2019-05-23)
Using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions
The University of Pittsburgh's James McKone's research on using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions is featured in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A's Emerging Investigators special issue. (2019-10-29)
Space Weather Center to add world's first 'ensemble forecasting' capability
Goddard's Space Weather Laboratory recently received support under NASA's Space Technology Program Game Changing Program to implement (2012-01-27)
Bumpy liquid films could simplify fabrication of microlenses
Have you ever noticed that when heated a film of oil in a pan doesn't remain completely flat? (2016-02-11)
SwRI's Bottke named Fellow of Meteoritical Society
Dr. William Bottke, a planetary scientist from Southwest Research Institute, was recently named a Fellow of the Meteoritical Society, recognizing his contributions to meteoritics and related endeavors. (2016-05-31)
Chemically storing solar power
Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have developed a cell, which can harness UV light and store it chemically by pumping oxygen ions through a membrane. (2016-02-22)
For creating new field of science, Texas chemist wins international prize
Allen Bard, professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, was awarded the 2008 Wolf Prize in Chemistry jointly with Professor William Moerner of Stanford University. (2008-01-23)
Move over Bear Grylls! Academics build ultimate solar-powered water purifier
You've seen Bear Grylls turn foul water into drinking water with little more than sunlight and plastic. (2017-01-30)
Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano
Brown University researchers have improved the resolution of terahertz emission spectroscopy -- a technique used to study a wide variety of materials -- by 1,000-fold, making the technique useful at the nanoscale. (2017-10-19)
A new way to measure solar panel degradation
How does one inspect solar panels in real time, in a way that is both cost-effective and time-efficient? (2019-01-10)
Harnessing light for a solar-powered chemical industry
Chemical manufacturing accounts for 10 percent of global energy consumption and 7 percent of industrial greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-01-30)
SwRI-led team identifies water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu
A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. (2019-03-19)
Exomoons may be home to extra-terrestrial life
Computer simulations were run to calculate whether a moon orbiting outside the ring system of J1407b caused gaps. (2019-06-04)
Stem cell materials could boost research into key diseases
Stem cell manufacturing for drug screening and treatments for diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's could be boosted by a new method of generating stem cells, a study suggests. (2013-01-08)
Adapted Trombe wall now used for both building heating and cooling
Researcher Marwa Dabaieh from Lund University in Sweden has come up with a way to adapt the so-called Trombe wall -- a passive solar building design from the 19th century -- to not only heat but also cool buildings, while drastically reduce associated carbon emissions. (2016-02-24)
NUS researchers achieve major breakthrough in flexible electronics
A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore has successfully developed conducting polymer films that can provide unprecedented ohmic contacts to give superior performance in plastic electronics, including organic light-emitting diodes, solar cells and transistors. (2017-01-13)
Sun shoots out 2 coronal mass ejections
On Jan. 23, 2013, at 9:55 a.m. EST, the sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, or CME. (2013-01-24)
Could solar eclipses disrupt electricity in Germany?
Could a solar eclipse over Europe during the day affect the power generated by Germany's photovoltaic systems or solar panels, thereby challenging the reliability of the electrical supply across the country? (2015-11-09)
NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system
Now in 2017, inspired by the event in Boulder, NASA scientists will explore the moon's eclipse of the sun to learn more about Earth's energy system. (2017-07-20)
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