Popular Space Shuttle News and Current Events

Popular Space Shuttle News and Current Events, Space Shuttle News Articles.
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One among many
Anyone moving in a large crowd, absorbed in their phone and yet avoiding collisions, follows certain laws that they themselves create. The movement of individuals as a condition for the movement of masses is the subject of a recent study by Dr. Andrey Korbut from the Higher School of Economics. (2019-03-12)

Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. (2018-01-31)

NASA Ppotects its super heroes from space weather
When astronauts travel in space they can't see or even feel radiation. However, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is studying the effects radiation plays on the human body and developing ways to monitor and protect against this silent hazard. (2017-08-17)

Webb Telescope sunshield passes launch depressurization tests to verify flight design
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope continues to make significant progress, successfully completing a series of sunshield vent tests that validate the telescope's sunshield design. (2010-10-08)

Up, up and away, in the name of science education
US researchers extol the virtues of high-altitude balloons for science education in a research paper published in the International Journal of Learning Technology. According to Jeremy Straub of the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, 'High-altitude balloons can carry student and scientific payloads to the boundaries of space.' (2015-06-29)

Microbes may help astronauts transform human waste into food
Human waste may one day be a valuable resource for astronauts on deep-space missions. Now, a Penn State research team has shown that it is possible to rapidly break down solid and liquid waste to grow food with a series of microbial reactors, while simultaneously minimizing pathogen growth. (2018-01-25)

Diagnosis is a collaborative process
According to family physician Norbert Donner-Banzhoff, building an effective relationship with a patient and making a diagnosis are not separate skills. Rather, diagnosing a patient efficiently and effectively is a process best shared by patient and physician. (2018-07-10)

Organic molecule benzonitrile detected in space
Scientists studying a cold molecular cloud of the Taurus region with radio telescopes have detected the presence of a particular organic molecule called benzonitrile. The finding marks the first time a specific aromatic molecule has been identified in space using radio spectroscopy. (2018-01-11)

Dark matter and dark energy: Do they really exist?
Researchers have hypothesized that the universe contains a 'dark matter.' They have also posited the existence of a 'dark energy.' These two hypotheses account for the movement of stars in galaxies and for the accelerating expansion of the universe. But -- according to a researcher at UNIGE -- these concepts may be no longer valid: the phenomena can be demonstrated without them. This research exploits a new theoretical model based on the scale invariance of the empty space. (2017-11-22)

New math bridges holography and twistor theory
A new perspective bridges two approaches to understanding quantum gravity. (2018-03-29)

New offices make us more image-conscious
Employees subconsciously act and dress differently in modern open-plan office environments, according to a new study published in the journal Gender, Work and Organization. (2018-05-01)

Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites. (2017-05-17)

Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants
A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed 'Fastron,' runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time. (2017-11-14)

Farthest star ever seen in the universe detected
An international team of researchers including the Kavli IPMU have observed the most distant individual star, 9 billion light years from Earth. (2018-04-02)

NASA GOLD Mission to image Earth's interface to space
On Jan. 25, 2018, NASA launches Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, a hosted instrument aboard SES-14 that will inspect the dynamic intermingling of space and Earth's uppermost atmosphere. (2018-01-24)

Researchers find ways to impede progress of neurodegenerative diseases
As the paper posits, there is currently no doubt that hyperpolarization of mitochondria and concomitant oxidative stress are associated with the development of serious pathologies, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, autoimmune syndromes, some cancers, and other conditions. Hyperpolarized mitochondria have an elevated transmembrane potential because of the excess of H+ ions in the intermembrane space in comparison with the matrix (pH 8). (2018-03-30)

How do plants protect themselves against sunburn?
To protect themselves against UV-B, which are highly harmful, plants have developed cellular tools to detect them and build biochemical defenses. A team of Swiss biologists discovered the existence of a UV-B receptor a few years ago. Today, these researchers demonstrate how these receptors, once activated by UV-B, associate with proteins that assist them to be assembled in the cell nucleus and to develop responses for survival and acclimation. (2016-07-11)

NASA moon data provides more accurate 2017 eclipse path
Thanks to elevation data of the moon from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, coupled with detailed NASA topography data of Earth, we have the most accurate maps of the path of totality for any eclipse to date. (2017-01-05)

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disorders
A broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism. (2018-06-22)

Nearby supernova ashes continue to rain on Earth
Traces of 60Fe detected in space indicate that a nearby supernova occurred within the last few million years. The iron isotope 60Fe, which is very rare, is created when a massive star collapses in the form of supernova. (2016-04-21)

Better cathode materials for lithium-sulphur-batteries
A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has for the first time fabricated a nanomaterial made from nanoparticles of a titanium oxide compound (Ti4O7) that is characterized by an extremely large surface area, and tested it as a cathode material in lithium-sulphur batteries. The highly porous nanomaterial possesses high storage capacity that remains nearly constant over many charging cycles. (2017-05-17)

Eating your veggies, even in space
Travelling to Mars will require astronauts to grow their own food. The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is creating the planters for cultivating veggies in space. Now that researchers have finished lettuce-growing experiments, they'll be embarking on bean trials. (2019-01-04)

Space fever: Weightlessness increases astronauts' body temperature
Astronauts float weightlessly through space, and the condition of weightlessness is something many would love to experience. However, in addition to producing both physical and psychological stress, a trip into space affects our core body temperature. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have observed that astronauts run hot when exposed to weightlessness, and that, even at rest, their body temperature is approximately 1°C above the normal value of 37°C (98.6°F). (2018-01-05)

Two weeks in the life of a sunspot
During its 13-day trip across the face of the sun, a sunspot recently put on a show for NASA's sun-watching satellites, producing several solar flares, a coronal mass ejection and a solar energetic particle event. (2017-08-04)

Sandia work launched on space shuttle shows live cells influence growth of nanostructures
Sensors, TB modeling, cell preparation and surgical implant safety may all be improved by a Sandia Labs and University of New Mexico discovery that live cells improve nanostructures when inserted in slurry that, drying, self-assembles into them. The nanostructures support single-cell life forms that are sensitive to and interact with their environment. (2006-07-21)

Hubble to use moon as mirror to see Venus transit
A mottled landscape showing the impact crater Tycho is among the most violent-looking places on our moon. Astronomers didn't aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study Tycho, however. The image was taken in preparation to observe the transit of Venus across the sun's face on June 5-6. (2012-05-04)

UNH Researchers find space radiation is increasingly more hazardous
UNH Researchers Find Space Radiation is Increasingly More Hazardous. (2018-03-15)

May the forest be with you: GEDI moves toward launch to space station
GEDI (pronounced like 'Jedi,' of Star Wars fame) is a first-of-its-kind laser instrument designed to map the world's forests in 3-D from space. These measurements will help fill in critical gaps in scientists' understanding of how much carbon is stored in the world's forests, the potential for ecosystems to absorb rising concentrations of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere, and the impact of forest changes on biodiversity. (2018-05-04)

Seeing dark matter in a new light
A small team of astronomers have found a new way to 'see' the elusive dark matter haloes that surround galaxies, with a new technique 10 times more precise than the previous-best method. The work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (2020-11-06)

CALET makes first direct measurements of high energy electrons in space
The CALET Cosmic Ray experiment, led by Professor Shoji Torii from Waseda University in Japan, along with collaborators from LSU and other researchers in the US and abroad, have successfully carried out the high-precision measurement of cosmic-ray electron spectrum up to 3 tera electron volts (TeV) by using the CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on the Japanese Experimental Module, the Exposed Facility on the International Space Station. (2017-11-03)

First look at Jupiter's poles show strange geometric arrays of storms
With NASA's Juno spacecraft, scientists have gotten a good look at the top and bottom of the planet for the first time. What they found astounded them: bizarre geometric arrangements of storms, each arrayed around one cyclone over the north and south poles -- unlike any storm formation seen in the universe. (2018-03-07)

Ulysses mission coming to a natural end
Ulysses, the mission to study the Sun's poles and the influence of our star on surrounding space is coming to an end. After more than 17 years in space -- almost four times its expected lifetime -- the mission is finally succumbing to its harsh environment and is likely to finish sometime in the next month or two. (2008-02-22)

Space-related start-up technology companies create synergistic innovation
Researchers have developed innovative business models underlying the successful launch of space-related start-up technology companies in Costa Rica. (2018-09-21)

Ancient signals from the early universe
For the first time, theoretical physicists from the University of Basel have calculated the signal of specific gravitational wave sources that emerged fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The source of the signal is a long-lost cosmological phenomenon called 'oscillon.' The journal Physical Review Letters has published the results. (2017-02-10)

A new approach to improving lithium-sulfur batteries
Researchers from the University of Delaware and China's Northwestern Polytechnical University, Shenzhen University and Hong Kong Polytechnic University have demonstrated a new polysulfide entrapping strategy that greatly improves the cycle stability of Li-S batteries. The work was published recently in the journal Advanced Materials. (2017-03-06)

Elon Musk's vision to colonize Mars updated in New Space
In 'Making Life Multi-Planetary' Elon Musk, CEO and Lead Designer at SpaceX, presents the updated design for the Big Falcon Rocket, the powerful rocket intended to propel a newly modified space vehicle to the International Space Station and beyond to fulfill his vision for establishing a human presence on Mars. (2018-03-26)

Can exercise, swimming goggles help protect astronauts against spaceflight-associated changes to eye, vision?
Astronauts on long missions at the International Space Station can experience changes to their eyes and vision that can last for years. This study included 20 men who on three separate days at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston completed exercises while on their back and tilted back head-first (to simulate the effect of exercise in space); 10 of the participants wore swimming goggles. (2019-04-18)

Ocean views linked to better mental health
Here's another reason to start saving for that beach house: new research suggests that residents with a view of the water are less stressed. (2016-04-28)

Active region on sun continues to emit solar flares
The sun emitted two mid-level solar flares on Sept. 7, 2017. The first peaked at 6:15 a.m. EDT. The second, larger flare, peaked at 10:36 a.m. EDT. These are the fourth and fifth sizable flares from the same active region since Sept. 4. (2017-09-07)

Surgery in space
With renewed public interest in manned space exploration comes the potential need to diagnose and treat medical issues encountered by future space travelers. (2018-06-20)

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