Popular Spectroscopy News and Current Events

Popular Spectroscopy News and Current Events, Spectroscopy News Articles.
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Terahertz imaging of graphene paves the way to industrialisation
X-ray scans revolutionised medical treatments by allowing us to see inside humans without surgery. Similarly, terahertz spectroscopy penetrates graphene films allowing scientists to make detailed maps of their electrical quality, without damaging or contaminating the material. The Graphene Flagship brought together researchers from academia and industry to develop and mature this analytical technique, and now a novel measurement tool for graphene characterisation is ready. (2021-02-23)

Spying on topology
Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular -- trivial -- counterparts within a millionth of a billionth of a second by probing it with ultra-fast laser light. (2019-10-02)

Scientists find safer ways to detect uranium minerals
The threat of (2006-11-20)

Optical tweezers steer a chemical reaction from just 2 atoms
Highlighting the fine level of control modern chemists possess, researchers have trapped two single atoms -- sodium and cesium -- in separate 'optical tweezers' and then maneuvered them together, resulting in a single molecule of sodium cesium (NaCs) with unique properties. (2018-04-12)

Mapping Biodiversity and Conservation Hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation. (2017-02-09)

Organic molecule benzonitrile detected in space
Scientists studying a cold molecular cloud of the Taurus region with radio telescopes have detected the presence of a particular organic molecule called benzonitrile. The finding marks the first time a specific aromatic molecule has been identified in space using radio spectroscopy. (2018-01-11)

IU-led study finds neurotransmitter may play a role in alcohol relapse, addiction
Indiana University researchers scanned the brains of individuals with alcohol abuse disorder and found that the neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some addition cravings. (2018-02-12)

Chemically tailored graphene
Graphene is considered as one of the most promising new materials. However, the systematic insertion of chemically bound atoms and molecules to control its properties is still a major challenge. Now, for the first time, scientists of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, the University of Vienna, the Freie Universität Berlin and the University Yachay Tech in Ecuador succeeded in precisely verifying the spectral fingerprint of such compounds in both theory and experiment. (2017-05-08)

Galaxies that feed on other galaxies
An international team of astronomers led by Giuseppina Battaglia, researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), finds signs that the outer halo of the Milky Way contains stellar remains of massive dwarf galaxies that were devoured by our own. (2018-01-31)

Mapping biodiversity and conservation hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation. (2017-01-26)

Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules
Munich based Laser physicists have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis. (2018-02-23)

Unraveling truly one-dimensional carbon solids
Elemental carbon appears in many different forms, including diamond and graphite. In an international collaboration, researchers at the University of Vienna, led by Thomas Pichler, have succeeded in developing a novel route for the bulk production of carbon chains composed of more than 6,000 carbon atoms, using thin double-walled carbon nanotubes as protective hosts for the chains. These findings represent an elegant forerunner towards the final goal of carbyne's bulk production and will be published in Nature Materials. (2016-04-04)

Protein research: The computer as microscope
Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. With high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off. (2017-01-16)

Monitoring positive charges in solar materials
EPFL, PSI and APS scientists have implemented a novel way of detecting positive charges (holes) and their trapping in solar materials. (2018-02-02)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatment
India is a second largest producer of leather, and being so, leather production and dyeing significantly contribute to pollution of water resources in India. Consistent dyeing of leather is difficult due to the unique nature of the raw material (matrix of collagen fibers), thus leather dyeing and finishing involves numerous wet chemical treatments having huge environmental impacts. (2017-08-29)

Visualizing nuclear radiation
Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation. (2017-03-22)

Mate or hibernate? That's the question worm pheromones answer
Scientists from the University of Florida, Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology and the US Department of Agriculture have discovered the first mating pheromone in one of science's most well-studied research subjects, the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. But perhaps even more interesting is what the newly discovered pheromone also directs worms to do -- hibernate. (2008-07-24)

Powerful new tool for looking for life beyond Earth
NASA has developed an innovative new spectroscopy instrument to aid the search for extraterrestrial life. The new instrument is designed to detect compounds and minerals associated with biological activity more quickly and with greater sensitivity than previous instruments. (2017-12-20)

Near infrared chemical imaging can help maintain the safety of pharmaceutical tablets
The final step in pharmaceutical production is often tableting. Near infrared chemical imaging can be used to monitor inconsistencies in the powder that will become the tablet, which have been introduced by mechanical processes in the tableting equipment and can lead to out of specification tablets. (2018-03-12)

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteries
IBS scientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed. (2017-03-27)

Carbon nanotube measurements: latest in NIST 'how-to' series
NIST, in collaboration with NASA, has published detailed guidelines for making essential measurements on samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The new guide constitutes the current (2008-04-15)

Tai Chi improves brain metabolism and muscle energetics in older adults
A new Journal of Neuroimaging study provides insights into the biochemical mechanisms by which Tai Chi -- a mind-body exercise -- may provide both physical and psychological benefits. (2018-04-19)

U-M researchers develop technique that could detect explosives, dangerous gases rapidly and remotely
University of Michigan researchers have developed a laser-based method that could be used to detect chemicals such as explosives and dangerous gases quickly and accurately. (2017-09-29)

It's a trap!
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have published a new study that identifies the process by which holes get trapped in nanoparticles made of zinc oxide, a material of potential interest for solar applications because it absorbs ultraviolet light. (2018-03-28)

How smelly is your rubbish?
A new method is being developed to assess the odorous impact of composting. (2018-01-24)

MaNGA data release includes detailed maps of thousands of nearby galaxies
The latest data release from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) includes observations revealing the internal structure and composition of nearly 5,000 nearby galaxies observed during the first three years of a program called Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA). (2019-01-29)

NUS engineers develop novel method for resolving spin texture of topological surface states using transport measurements
A research breakthrough from the National University of Singapore has revealed a close relation between the spin texture of topological surface states and a new kind of magneto-resistance. The team's finding could help in addressing the issue of spin current source selection often faced in the development of spintronic devices. (2018-04-26)

Researchers develop spectroscopic thermometer for nanomaterials
A scientific team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair. This discovery, published in Physical Review Letters, promises to improve the understanding of useful yet unusual physical and chemical behaviors that arise in materials and structures at the nanoscale. (2018-03-13)

HKU scientist makes key discoveries in the search for life on Mars
Dr. Joseph Michalski and his colleagues have published papers recently that cast increased doubt on the idea of surface life evolving on Mars. (2018-02-06)

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region
Chemical compounds carry distinctive absorption (2018-03-15)

Physicists uncover new competing state of matter in superconducting material
A team of experimentalists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and theoreticians at University of Alabama Birmingham discovered a remarkably long-lived new state of matter in an iron pnictide superconductor, which reveals a laser-induced formation of collective behaviors that compete with superconductivity. (2019-01-02)

Observing biological nanotransporters
A research team of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) was able to describe with atomic detail how molecules are transported through biological membranes. Computer simulations and spectroscopic experiments provided insights into the work of so-called ABC transporters. These proteins play an important role in the drug resistance of tumour cells and bacteria. (2018-04-13)

A new advanced forensics tool
Polymers are highly prized by industry and increasingly used as replacements for metals in the manufacture of e.g. automobile parts and firearms. Such parts are marked with serial numbers, for security and traceability purposes. The numbers may however be partially or completely erased, and although there are techniques for recovering them from metal parts, this is not the case for polymers. (2017-11-01)

MSU-based physicists witnessed the turning of a dielectric into a conductor
A scientist from the Faculty of Physics, MSU together with Russian and foreign colleagues studied changes in the behavior of electrons in one of the types of dielectrics with high time resolution and witnessed how the material turned into a conductor under the influence of ultra-short laser impulses. The method may be used to study high-speed processes. The theoretical study was published in Nature Photonics journal. (2018-03-26)

In-cell NMR: A new application
The structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, mode of interaction and relationship with their neighbours, and how physiological processes are altered by mutations or changes in the molecular environment. (2017-03-08)

Beware doping athletes! This sensor may be your downfall
A new light-trapping sensor, developed by a University at Buffalo-led team of engineers and described in an Advanced Optical Materials study, makes infrared absorption more sensitive, inexpensive and versatile. It may improve scientists' ability use to sleuth out performance-enhancing drugs in blood samples, tiny particles of explosives in the air and more. (2017-07-31)

Multiple optical measurements reveal the single cell activation without contrast agent
Osaka University researchers developed a label-free multimodal microscopy platform that allows the non-invasive study of cellular preparations without the need of any additional chemicals or contrast agent. The parameters extracted from these measurements, coupled with machine algorithms, enable the study of fine cellular processes such as macrophage cells activation upon exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The authors demonstrate that activation, as well as partial activation inhibition, can be observed at single-cell level through phenotypic and molecular characterization purely through non-invasive optical means. (2018-03-08)

Laser-driven electron recollision remembers molecular orbital structure
Scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin combined state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations to test a fundamental assumption underlying strong-field physics. Their results refine our understanding of strong-field processes such as high harmonic generation (HHG) and laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED). (2018-05-04)

Periodic table still influencing today's research
This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Periodic Table, and the principles that drove Dmitri Mendeleev to construct his table are still influencing today's research advances. (2019-02-07)

Airborne thermometer to measure Arctic temperatures
The radiometry techniques in use for remote sensing of water temperature currently are only precise up to about a half degree. Russian scientists have compared the effectiveness of several techniques of remote water temperature detection based on laser spectroscopy and evaluated various approaches to spectral profile interpretation. Authors developed the technique that is precise up to 0.15 degrees Celsius. The research findings will support further development of sea surface temperature remote sensing solutions. (2017-01-10)

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