Popular Spiders News and Current Events

Popular Spiders News and Current Events, Spiders News Articles.
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Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by McMaster behavioural scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group. (2019-03-19)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

The fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disorders
Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behavior, including checking. (2017-12-13)

Nature's smallest rainbows, created by peacock spiders, may inspire new optical technology
The mechanism behind these tiny rainbows may inspire new color technology, but wouldn't have been discovered without research combining basic natural history with physics and engineering. These super iridescent spider scales can be used to overcome current limitations in spectral manipulation, and to reduce the size of optical spectrometers for applications where fine-scale spectral resolution is required in a very small package, notably instruments on space missions, or wearable chemical detection systems. (2018-01-02)

New species of marine spider emerges at low tide to remind scientists of Bob Marley
It was 02:00h on 11 January 2009 when the sea along the coastline of Australia's 'Sunshine State' of Queensland receded to such an extent that it exposed a population of water-adapted spiders. The observant researchers, who would later describe this population as a species new to science, were quick to associate their emergence with Bob Marley's song 'High Tide or Low Tide'. Their study is published in the open access journal Evolutionary Systematics. (2017-12-22)

Yale study offers new paradigm on ecosystem ecology
Predators have considerably more influence than plants over how an ecosystem functions, according to a Yale study published today in Science. (2008-02-14)

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-01)

Scientists investigate how different houses and lifestyles affect which bugs live with us
Humans have lived under the same roof with bugs since we first began building shelters 20,000 years ago. Now, scientists are studying how physical factors of our homes -- from the floor plan and the number of windows to even how tidy we are -- may play a role in the diversity of the multi-legged communities populating the indoor environment. (2017-11-10)

UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes
Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges. (2018-01-11)

Fastest spin on Earth? For animals that rely on legs, scientists say one spider takes gold
New research from the University of California Merced and the California Academy of Sciences shows that individuals from the spider family Selenopidae -- commonly known as flattie spiders -- can sense prey approaching from any direction and whip around in one-eighth of a second to strike. High-speed footage reveals that a swift flex of their long legs helps the hunters accomplish this feat, deemed the fastest leg-driven turn of any animal on the planet. Findings are published today in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (2018-02-12)

Spider eat spider: Scientists discover 18 new spider-hunting pelican spiders in Madagascar
Scientists examined and analyzed hundreds of pelican spiders both in the field in Madagascar and through study of pelican spiders preserved in museum collections. Their analysis sorted the spiders studied into 26 different species -- 18 of which have never before been described. The new species add to scientists' understanding of Madagascar's renowned biodiversity, and will help scientists investigate how pelican spiders' unusual traits have evolved and diversified over time. (2018-01-11)

Gehry's Biodiversity Museum -- favorite attraction for the butterflies and moths in Panama
Ahead of Gehry's Biodiversity Museum's opening in October 2014, Ph.D. candidate Patricia Esther Corro Chang studied the butterflies and moths which had been attracted by the bright colors of the walls and which were visiting the grounds of the tourist site. The resulting checklist, published in the open-access journal Biodiversity Data Journal, aims to encourage the preservation and development of the Amador Causeway and the four Causeway Islands. (2017-03-06)

Horrific mating strategy appears to benefit both male and female redback spiders
A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found. (2017-12-14)

Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study finds
Clusters of holes may be evolutionarily indicative of contamination and disease -- visual cues for rotten or moldy food or skin marred by an infection. (2018-01-04)

Seven new spider species from Brazil named after 7 famous fictional spider characters
Characters from 'A Song of Ice and Fire,' 'Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,' 'The Lord of the Rings,' 'The Silmarillion,' H. P. Lovecraft's 'The Call of Cthulhu' and the children's favorite 'Charlotte's Web' and 'Little Miss Spider' are further immortalized and linked together thanks to a Brazilian research team who named seven new small cave-dwelling spiders after them. They are described in a new study published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2018-01-10)

Jumping spiders court in color
UC biologist discovers unique visual diversities for rare color vision in two groups of jumping spiders. (2017-01-25)

Caribbean spiders named for Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders David Bowie, and others
A new paper published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society has identified and named 15 new species of spider in the Caribbean. Given the vernacular names 'smiley faced' spiders due to the distinctive markings on their backs, the new species have been given names including S. davidattenboroughi, S. barackobamai, and S.leonardodicaprioi. (2017-09-26)

Fish team up for more food
A tiny striped fish called Neolamprologus obscurus only found in Lake Tanganyika in Zambia excavates stones to create shelter and increase the abundance of food for all fish in the group. Led by Hirokazu Tanaka of the University of Bern in Switzerland and the Osaka City University in Japan, this study is the first to document how team work in fish helps them to acquire more food. The research is published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. (2018-03-06)

University of Houston study shows BP oil spill hurt marshes, but recovery possible
A study published in PLoS ONE by two researchers at the University of Houston shows that arthropods living in coastal salt marshes affected by BP oil spill were damaged but they were able to recover if their host plants remained healthy. (2012-03-07)

Social susceptibility
UCSB evolutionary ecologist Jonathan Pruitt and colleagues study the leader-follower dynamics of influential individuals in a social group. (2018-01-02)

When natural disaster strikes, can insects and other invertebrates recover?
After a 100-year flood struck south central Oklahoma in 2015, a study of the insects, arthropods, and other invertebrates in the area revealed striking declines of most invertebrates in the local ecosystem, a result that researchers say illustrates the hidden impacts of natural disasters. (2018-03-15)

Earth's first giant predators produced killer babies
A new fossil study, led by Jianni Liu from the Northwest University in China, shows young radiodontan arthropods could be voracious predators too. (2018-06-02)

Brown recluse: Pest management tips for the spider that's not as common as you think
The brown recluse is one of the few spiders that can bite a human and should be regarded with great caution. But, it is also frequently misattributed as the cause of a variety of unrelated medical conditions, especially in locations far outside its known range. The open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management has published a new guide to aid both the public and pest management professionals in properly identifying and managing the brown recluse spider. (2018-01-29)

Studying sleep's profound and extensive effects on brain function
Although the general benefits of a good night's sleep are well established, one-third of American adults do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. Recent research sheds new light on the extensive effects of sleep on the brain, as well as the harms caused by sleep loss. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2017-11-12)

Tough stuff: Spider silk enhanced with graphene-based materials
Natural spider silk has excellent mechanical properties. Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have found a way to boost the strength of spider's silk using graphene-based materials, paving the way for a novel class of high-performance bionic composites. (2017-09-13)

Discovery: Bernie Sanders spider
Students and a scientist at the University of Vermont have discovered 15 new species of 'smiley-faced' spiders -- and named them after, among others, David Attenborough, Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. (2017-09-26)

Molecular insights into spider silk
Spider silk belongs to the toughest fibres in nature and has astounding properties. Scientists from the University of Würzburg discovered new molecular details of self-assembly of a spider silk fibre protein. (2018-12-07)

World's most venomous spiders are actually cousins
Two lineages of dangerous arachnids found in Australia--long classified as distantly related in the official taxonomy--are, in fact, relatively close evolutionary cousins. The lineages include the most venomous spiders in the world. The findings could help in the development of novel antivenoms, as well as point to new forms of insecticides. (2018-02-15)

Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and brownies
A remarkably high diversity of goblin spiders is reported from the Sri Lankan forests by two researchers from the National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Nine new species are described in a recent paper in the open-access journal Evolutionary Systematics, where six are named after goblins and brownies from Enid Blyton's children's books. There are now 45 goblin spider species belonging to 13 genera known to inhabit the island country. (2018-06-21)

Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart
Researchers studying near-identical species of millipedes found a new way to tell them apart: shining a blacklight on them. Under the UV light, parts of the different species' genitals will glow different colors. This discovery has allowed scientists to rewrite this part of the millipede family tree. (2019-04-18)

Study explains how geckos gracefully gallop on water
Geckos are amazingly agile. In addition to running across land and up trees, the animals can prance across the surface of water. A new study reveals how they do it. (2018-12-06)

Urban biodiversity: Remarkable diversity of small animals in Basel gardens
Gardens in urban areas can harbor a remarkable diversity of species. This has been found by researchers from the University of Basel in a field study carried out with the support of private garden owners from the Basel region. Furthermore, the research team shows that nature-friendly garden management and design can largely compensate for the negative effects of urbanization on biodiversity. The study will be presented at the public conference 'Nature conservation in and around Basel' on Feb. 1, 2019. (2019-01-30)

Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives
Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University, have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates. (2017-12-04)

Remarkable spider with a tail found preserved in amber after 100 million years
An extraordinary new species of arachnid, resembling a spider with a tail, has been discovered in amber from Myanmar of mid-Cretaceous age, around 100 million years ago. (2018-02-05)

These spiders can hear
Ogre-faced spiders hide during the day and hunt by night, dangling from palm fronds and casting nets on insects. Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on October 29 have discovered that they can hear their predators and prey, using specialized receptors to pick up sounds from at least 2 meters away. The results suggest that spiders can hear low frequency sounds from insect prey as well as higher frequency sounds from bird predators. (2020-10-29)

Habitat counts when predators lurk
Something in the way it moves -- or not -- can save a creature's life in the wild, depending on whether it's exposed in the open or hiding in a complex habitat. A Rice University researcher studied patterns among a set of predator-prey pairings to see how the latter behaved when hunted. (2017-12-13)

Hawaiian stick spiders re-evolve the same three guises every time they island hop
We don't usually expect evolution to be predictable. But Hawaiian stick spiders of the Ariamnes genus have repeatedly evolved the same distinctive forms, known as ecomorphs, on different islands, researchers report on March 8 in the journal Current Biology. Ecomorphs -- which look similar and live in similar habitats, but aren't as closely related as they appear -- are surprisingly rare. The researchers hope that these newly described ones might help us understand this strange evolutionary pattern. (2018-03-08)

Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology. (2020-08-13)

Birds eat 400 to 500 million tonnes of insects annually
Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control. (2018-07-09)

390-million-year-old scorpion fossil -- biggest bug known
The gigantic fossil claw of an 390 million-year-old sea scorpion, recently found in Germany, shows that ancient arthropods -- spiders, insects, crabs and the like -- were surprisingly larger than their modern-day counterparts. (2007-11-21)

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