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Popular Spinal Cord News and Current Events, Spinal Cord News Articles.
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NIH-funded study suggests acetaminophen in pregnancy linked to higher risk of ADHD, autism
Exposure to acetaminophen in the womb may increase a child's risk for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality. (2019-10-30)
Major NIH grant will support early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease via skin testing
An expert team from Case Western Reserve University has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) via an innovative skin testing approach. (2019-10-04)
How many types of neurons are there in the brain?
For decades, scientists have struggled to develop a comprehensive census of cell types in the brain. (2016-03-03)
Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)
3-D printing helps treat woman with spinal condition
Clinicians recently used 3-D printing to help treat a woman with a degenerative condition of the spinal column. (2017-04-20)
New drug hope for rare bone cancer patients
Patients with a rare bone cancer of the skull and spine -- chordoma -- could be helped by existing drugs, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University College London Cancer Institute and the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust. (2017-10-12)
Promising gene replacement therapy moves forward at Ohio State
Research led by Dr. Krystof Bankiewicz, who recently joined The Ohio State University College of Medicine, shows that gene replacement therapy for Niemann-Pick type A disease is safe for use in nonhuman primates and has therapeutic effects in mice. (2019-08-21)
Survey provides new directions for employment of people with disabilities
Survey findings indicate that the majority of employers have processes and practices in place for the inclusion of employees with and without disabilities, and that the commitment to the success of employees with disabilities is shared by supervisors and upper management. (2017-10-10)
Stem cell scientists discover genetic switch to increase supply of stem cells from cord blood
International stem cell scientists, co-led in Canada by Dr. John Dick and in the Netherlands by Dr. (2016-07-14)
Sleep chemical central to effectiveness of deep brain stimulation
A brain chemical that makes us sleepy also appears to play a central role in the success of deep brain stimulation to ease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. (2007-12-23)
Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
In their study of fish larvae, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Driever and his team of neurobiologists at the University of Freiburg discovered that a group of nerve cells in the forebrain release the neurotransmitter dopamine when activated by tactile or certain visual stimuli. (2017-01-13)
Radiologists attempt to solve mystery of Tut's demise
Egyptian radiologists who performed the first-ever computed tomography (CT) evaluation of King Tutankhamun's mummy believe they have solved the mystery of how the ancient pharaoh died. (2006-11-27)
Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-01-13)
Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. (2019-11-05)
Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences. (2016-05-31)
Workplace stress can take a toll on your brain surgeon, too
A new study by the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that two-thirds of neurosurgeons experience burnout during training, and stressors at work are partly to blame. (2018-02-09)
Study finds children with autism and ADHD at higher rise for anxiety
Children with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for being diagnosed with or treated for anxiety and mood disorders, according to a study published in Pediatrics today. (2018-03-30)
Scientists find positive workplace experiences among Americans with disabilities
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Kessler Foundation and the University of New Hampshire, Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD), have authored a new article that identifies how Americans with disabilities are striving to work and overcoming barriers to employment. (2018-04-13)
New research lights up chronic bacterial infection inside bone
A new study describes how live animal imaging allows researchers to visualize chronic bacterial infection in the bone marrow of mice. (2008-12-22)
New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. (2018-12-14)
Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based training
Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire. (2018-01-31)
MBL scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene 'partners' in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage. (2019-03-06)
Stem cells found in adult skin can be transplanted and function in mouse models of disease
Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Calgary have found that stem cells derived from adult skin can create neural cell types that can be transplanted into and function in mouse models of disease. (2006-06-14)
New drug improves motor function of children with genetic disorder
Children with later-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were more likely to show gains in motor function when treated with a new medication compared to children receiving a sham procedure, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2018-02-14)
MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study shows
A test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C. (2018-04-05)
A review on the therapeutic antibodies for spinal cord injury
Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities. (2016-10-03)
Neurons modulate the growth of blood vessels
A team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. (2017-01-10)
Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2017-04-24)
Generating improvement in spinal cord injuries
Results from an ongoing treatment for spinal cord injury research study were announced on Jan. (2017-01-24)
Preliminary study suggests drug may help babies with spinal muscular atrophy
A preliminary study suggests that an investigational drug may help increase protein levels in babies with spinal muscular atrophy. (2018-04-18)
U of M begins nation's first clinical trial using T-reg cells from cord blood in leukemia treatment
University of Minnesota researchers have initiated a ground breaking clinical trial to determine the optimal dose and safety of T regulatory cells (T-regs) to decrease the risk of immune reactions common in patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation. (2007-09-05)
Protein shown to play a key role in normal development of nervous system
A protein that enables nerve cells to communicate with each other plays a key role in controlling the developing nervous system. (2008-10-07)
Slower walking speed in the elderly may be explained by loss of muscle strength and mass
Research recently published in The Journal of Physiology has found that elderly people walk at a slower speed and tire more quickly because of loss of strength and mass in leg muscles. (2018-01-17)
New advances in medication for muscle disease in children
Spinraza, the gene therapy medication, also provides significant improvements in cases with the next most severe form of neuromuscular disease, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), which afflicts children from 6 to 18 months of age. (2018-02-26)
Spinal cord injury research hampered by animal models, says new study
Research on traumatic spinal cord injuries is hampered by a reliance on animal experiments that don't accurately predict human outcomes, says a new study in the upcoming edition of the peer-reviewed journal Reviews in the Neurosciences. (2008-04-28)
Spinal cord injury patients face many serious health problems besides paralysis
Spinal cord patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain, according to a report published in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports. (2017-02-15)
Protein plays Jekyll and Hyde role in Lou Gehrig's disease
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movements from walking and swallowing to breathing. (2008-07-28)
New findings about why losartan is effective in treating Marfan syndrome may reshape our thinking about patient management
Progressive dilation of the aortic root is considered one of the most serious manifestations of Marfan syndrome. (2018-02-09)
Growing teeth and a backbone: Studies trace early origins of skeletal tissues
Two new studies on the evolutionary origin of teeth and of vertebra further illuminate the human connection to marine organisms that goes back millions of years. (2017-11-22)
Popular, common allergy medication may prevent neuromyelitis optica relapses
The addition of cetirizine (the popular allergy medication sold under the brand name Zyrtec) to standard therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and may reduce relapses in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a rare and severe disease that causes inflammation and demyelination (damage to the myelin - the protective coating of nerve cells), primarily in the optic nerve (optic neuritis), spinal cord (myelitis), and brainstem. (2018-02-02)
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