Popular Spintronics News and Current Events

Popular Spintronics News and Current Events, Spintronics News Articles.
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New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Novel thermal phases of topological quantum matter in the lab
A quantum simulation of topological phases of matter at finite temperature has be realized for the first time by a group of researchers from Universidad Complutense, IBM, ETH Zurich, MIT and Harvard University. These findings open the door to unexpected applications in robust quantum technologies against thermal fluctuations such as quantum computers or memories. (2018-04-17)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed
A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. (2019-04-17)

Antiferromagnets prove their potential for spin-based information technology
As published in the online science journal Nature Communications, scientists at the Institute of Phyics at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) were now able to demonstrate current-induced switching of the Néel vector also for metallic thin films of a compound consisting of manganese and gold, Mn2Au, which orders antiferromagnetically at high temperatures. (2018-01-29)

Practical spin wave transistor one step closer
University of Groningen physicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. These promise to be much more energy efficient than conventional electronics. The results were published on March 2 in Physical Review Letters. (2018-03-01)

Three-dimensional nanomagnets for the computer of tomorrow
Since the late 60's electronic devices have stored and transmitted information (bits) in two-dimensional circuits. Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have been able to break this barrier by creating a nanoscale magnetic circuit capable of moving information along the three dimensions of space. This breakthrough could lead to an important increase in storage and processing capacities of electronic devices over those used today. (2017-11-15)

Diamonds show promise for spintronic devices
Recently, researchers have been exploring the potential for a new technology, called spintronics, that relies on detecting and controlling a particle's spin. This technology could lead to new types of more efficient and powerful devices. In a paper published in Applied Physics Letters, researchers measured how strongly a charge carrier's spin interacts with a magnetic field in diamond. This crucial property shows diamond as a promising material for spintronic devices. (2018-01-29)

Majorana runners go long range: New topological phases of matter unveiled
New topological phases of matter have been discovered by researchers from Universidad Complutense, MIT, and Harvard University. They have found a mechanism that enhances the presence of Majorana quasiparticles at the edges of a topological superconductor. These findings open the door to unexpected applications in the development of quantum technologies. (2018-02-26)

Energy against the current on a quantum scale, without contradicting the laws of physics
In a classical thermodynamic system, the heat current flows from the hotter body to the colder one, or electricity from the higher voltage to the lower one. The same thing happens in quantum systems, but this state can be changed, and the flow of energy and particles can be reversed if a quantum observer is inserted into the system. (2017-10-06)

Creating a 2-D platinum magnet
University of Groningen physicists have induced magnetism in platinum with an electric field created by a paramagnetic ionic liquid. As only the surface of the platinum is affected, this creates a switchable 2-D ferromagnet. The study was published in Science Advances on April 6. (2018-04-06)

Nanoscale pillars as a building block for future information technology
Researchers from Linköping University and the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden propose a new device concept that can efficiently transfer the information carried by electron spin to light at room temperature -- a stepping stone towards future information technology. They present their approach in an article in Nature Communications. (2018-10-05)

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect
Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior. (2018-12-27)

X-ray experiments suggest high tunability of 2-D material
Researchers used MAESTRO, an X-ray platform at Berkeley Lab, to zero in on signatures of exotic electronic behavior in a 2-D material. They found that the material may be highly tunable, with potential applications in spintronics and other emerging fields. (2018-01-26)

Scientists find ordered magnetic patterns in disordered magnetic material
A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab has confirmed a special property known as 'chirality' -- which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way -- in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure. (2018-06-08)

Nanoparticles help realize 'spintronic' devices
For the first time researchers have demonstrated a new way to perform functions essential to future computation three orders of magnitude faster than current commercial devices. The team lead by Associate Professor Shinobu Ohya, created a nanoscale spintronic semiconductor device that can partially switch between specific magnetic states trillions of times a second (terahertz -- THz), far beyond frequencies of devices at present. (2019-03-05)

Catching radical molecules before they disappear
IBS researchers managed to stabilize short-lived radical ions which could be used for rechargeable batteries. (2017-12-13)

Some superconductors can also carry currents of 'spin'
Researchers have shown that certain superconductors -- materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures -- can also carry currents of 'spin'. The successful combination of superconductivity and spin could lead to a revolution in high-performance computing, by dramatically reducing energy consumption. (2018-04-16)

New hybrid nanostructures detect nanoscale magnetism
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a new process for growing a single multi-walled carbon nanotube that is embedded with cobalt nanostructures. Using this new hybrid material, the team determined that the electrical conductance of MWCNTs is sensitive enough to detect and be affected by trace amounts of magnetic activity. It is believed to be the first instance of demonstrating the detection of magnetic fields of such small magnets using an individual carbon nanotube. (2008-12-08)

Waterloo chemists create faster and more efficient way to process information
University of Waterloo chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and managed. (2018-05-11)

Supercomputers without waste heat
Physicists from the University of Konstanz explore superconductivity for information processing. (2018-12-07)

Surprising spin behavior at room temperature
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have observed almost purely circularly polarized electroluminescence from GaAs-based spin-polarized light-emitting diodes at room temperature, with no external magnetic field. This behavior indicates the presence of spin-dependent nonlinear processes, which may allow the development of semiconductor-based spin-photonic devices in the future. (2017-02-07)

MIPT physicists tune a spin diode
Physics modeled a spin diode, placing the device between two kinds of antiferromagnetic materials. Turning those antiferromagnets layers changes the resistance and resonant frequency of sandwich. (2018-03-07)

The MSU scientists created a magnetic trap for neutrons
A team from Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (MSU) together with their colleagues developed a magnetic waveguide able to sort neutrons with different spins and storethem different layers. The results of the study may help in study of electronic devices based on not charge of electrons but on their quantum state. The article was published in Physical Review B journal. (2018-01-09)

A new class of materials could realize quantum computers
Scientists at EPFL and PSI have discovered a new class of materials that can prove ideal for the implementation of spintronics. (2016-10-21)

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2-D material
Researchers from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, working with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research's AMOLF institute, have found a way to convert the spin information into a predictable light signal at room temperature. The discovery brings the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics closer together and might lead to the development of an energy-efficient way of processing data, in data centres, for example. (2018-01-25)

The world's first demonstration of spintronics-based artificial intelligence
Researchers at Tohoku University have, for the first time, successfully demonstrated the basic operation of spintronics-based artificial intelligence. (2016-12-20)

'Spintronics' could enable a new generation of electronic devices, physicists say
Physicists have discovered the equivalent of a new 'Ohm's Law' for spintronics - the emerging science of manipulating the spin of electrons for useful purposes. Unlike the Ohm's Law for electronics, the new 'Ohm's Law' says that the spin of the electron can be transported without any loss of energy, or dissipation. This effect occurs at room temperature in materials widely used in the semiconductor industry and could enable a new generation of computing devices. (2003-08-08)

Spintronics: Controlling magnetic spin with electric fields
EPFL physicists have found a way to reverse electron spins using electric fields for the first time, paving the way for programmable spintronics technologies. (2018-06-19)

A material with promising properties
The Collaborative Research Centre CRC 1214 at the University of Konstanz has developed a method for synthesizing Europium (II) oxide nanoparticles -- a ferromagnetic semiconductor that is relevant for data storage and data transport. (2017-11-22)

Futuristic data storage
The development of high-density data storage devices requires the highest possible density of elements in an array made up of individual nanomagnets. The closer they are together, the greater the magnetic interactions between them. In a paper published in EPJ B, P. Kim from the Kirensky Institute of Physics, associated with the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, and colleagues have devised a new model to study the variation of the magnetic interaction between such nanomagnets. (2018-06-19)

Topological domain walls in helimagnets
Special domain walls with magnetic vortex structures have been discovered in helimagnets. Domain walls can have exotic magnetic properties that the regions which they separate don't reveal. For example, it's possible that the walls may interact more strongly with an electric current and could be used for data transfer and storage in the future. (2018-05-03)

The quantum waltz of electrons hints at the next generation of chips
EPFL researchers have successfully measured some of the quantum properties of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors. This work in the field of spintronics could one day lead to chips that are not only smaller but that also generate less heat. (2017-12-05)

Graphene reveals its magnetic personality
Can organic matter behave like a fridge magnet? Scientists from the University of Manchester have now shown that it can. (2012-01-08)

40-year controversy in solid-state physics resolved
An international team at BESSY II headed by Prof. Oliver Rader has shown that the puzzling properties of samarium hexaboride do not stem from the material being a topological insulator, as it had been proposed to be. Theoretical and initial experimental work had previously indicated that this material, which becomes a Kondo insulator at very low temperatures, also possessed the properties of a topological insulator. The team has now published a compelling alternative explanation in Nature Communications, however. (2018-02-06)

Plenty of nothing: A hole new quantum spin
Scientists have created a tiny quantum wire that carries an electric current by exploiting the gaps -- or holes -- between electrons. The holes can be thought of as real quantum particles that have an electrical charge and a spin. They exhibit remarkable quantum properties and could lead to a new world of super-fast, low-powered transistors and powerful quantum computers. (2006-07-26)

Graphene flakes for future transistors
Tiny and very promising for possible applications in the field of nanoelectronics: they are the graphene nanoflakes studied by a SISSA's team and protagonists of a study recently published in the Nano Letters journal. These hexagonal shaped nanostructures would allow to exploit quantum effects to modulate the current flow. Thanks to their intrinsic magnetic properties, they could also represent a significant step forward in the field of spintronics, which is based on the electron spin. (2018-03-14)

Pressure tuned magnetism paves the way for novel electronic devices
Using very sensitive magnetic probes, an international team of researchers has found surprising evidence that magnetism which emerges at the interfaces between non-magnetic oxide thin layers can be easily tuned by exerting tiny mechanical forces. This discovery provides a new and unexpected handle to control magnetism, thus enabling denser magnetic memory, and opens new and unexpected routes for developing novel oxide-based spintronic devices. (2018-12-17)

Spin-resolved oscilloscope for charge and spin signals
Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation have developed a 'spin-resolved oscilloscope.' (2017-03-13)

Magnon spin currents can be controlled via spin valve structure
Construction set of magnon logic extended. (2018-03-14)

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