Popular Staphylococcus Aureus News and Current Events

Popular Staphylococcus Aureus News and Current Events, Staphylococcus Aureus News Articles.
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Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (2019-02-06)

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics
Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation in bacteria. Every treated mouse survived. The breakthrough study, published in Scientific Reports, suggests infections in humans might be cured the same way. (2018-10-17)

New findings detail how beneficial bacteria in the nose suppress pathogenic bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of the human body. Although, one quarter of the US population live with the bacteria and never get sick, having S. aureus present in the nostrils is a risk for infections that range in severity from mild skin to life- threatening MRSA infections. Research from the Forsyth Institute is providing insight into how harmless Corynebacterium species, bacterial members of the nasal and skin microbiome, help protect humans from disease. (2016-08-17)

Botulinum-type toxins jump to a new kind of bacteria
A toxin much like the one that causes botulism has unexpectedly turned up in a completely different type of bacteria - Enterococcus. Where it came from is unclear, but the finding is concerning because enterococci have lately become a leading cause of multi-drug-resistant infections, especially in health care settings. (2018-01-26)

Researchers downplay MRSA screening as effective infection control intervention
Three Virginia Commonwealth University epidemiologists are downplaying the value of mandatory universal nasal screening of patients for MRSA, arguing that proven, hospital-wide infection control practices can prevent more of the potentially fatal infections. (2008-10-23)

Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)

Genome sleuthing tracks the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
esearchers tracked the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during a one-year period in the East of England, and observed evidence for transmission of the bacteria in the community resulting from clinically unrecognized episodes. (2017-10-25)

Compounds restore antibiotics' efficacy against MRSA
Antibiotics rendered useless by the notorious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, (MRSA) may get a second life, thanks to compounds that can restore the bug's susceptibility to antibiotics, according to a new study in mice. (2016-03-09)

Two antibiotics fight bacteria differently than thought
Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. Instead of indiscriminately stopping protein synthesis, the drugs put the brakes on the protein synthesis machinery only at specific locations in the gene. (2016-11-01)

Staphylococcus aureus: A new mechanism involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance
An Institut Pasteur-CNRS research team has characterized a Staphylococcus aureus gene involved in virulence, biofilm formation and resistance to certain antibiotics. These results open up new avenues for understanding the control of S. aureus virulence mechanisms. This work was recently published in the journal PLoS Pathogens. (2018-03-23)

Tobacco smoke makes germs more resilient
University of Louisville School of Dentistry researcher David A. Scott, Ph.D., explores how cigarettes lead to colonization of bacteria in the body. (2016-05-31)

Potential new way to limit antibiotic resistance spreading
One of the biggest current threats to global health is the rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria, caused by the spreading of antibiotic resistance amongst them. In an attempt to help fight this threat, EMBL researchers have unraveled the molecular basis of a major antibiotic resistance transfer mechanism. They also developed molecules and a proof-of-principle for blocking this transfer. Cell publishes their results on March 15. (2018-03-15)

Fighting MRSA with new membrane-busting compounds
Public health officials are increasingly concerned over methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The bacteria have developed resistance to a number of treatments, even antibiotics of last resort in some cases. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Bioconjugate Chemistry that a new class of compounds can treat MRSA skin infections in mice with no signs of acute toxicity, and no signs that the bacteria would develop resistance to them after many applications. (2017-03-15)

Livestock-associated MRSAfound among MRSA from humans
The survey results show more frequent detections and geographical dispersion of LA-MRSA in humans in the EU/EEA since 2007, and highlight the public health and veterinary importance of LA-MRSA as a 'One Health' issue. The ECDC advocates for periodic systematic surveys or integrated multi-sectorial surveillance to facilitate control measures. (2017-11-03)

Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance
UNC School of Medicine scientists found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease an antibiotic's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus, another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa. The findings, published in PLoS Biology, point to the possibility of new antibiotics employing these factors to enhance antibiotic susceptibility. (2017-12-05)

Variation between strains may account for differences in vulnerability to infection
New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe. (2018-01-11)

Team IDs weakness in anthrax bacteria
MIT and New York University researchers have identified a weakness in the defenses of the anthrax bacterium that could be exploited to produce new antibiotics. (2008-01-24)

Skin bacteria help cancer cells grow
Our skin is covered in millions of bacteria and most of them help keep us healthy. However, for patients with lymphoma, it may be a rather different story, as new research from the University of Copenhagen shows that toxins in the staphylococcus bacteria help cancer cells gain control over healthy cells. The Danish Cancer Society's Break Cancer Collection contributed DKK 3 million (US$0.5 million) to the research project. (2016-01-06)

RNAIII (RIP) & Deriv. as potential tools for the treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections
S. aureus under the biofilm mode of growth is often related to several nosocomial infections, more frequently associated with indwelling medical devices (catheters, prostheses, portacaths or heart valves).The present paper will provide an overview on the activity and potential applications of RIP as biofilm inhibiting compound, useful in the management of S. aureus biofilm infections. (2018-12-14)

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infections
Neurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery. Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia. (2018-03-05)

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks
A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers are the first to reveal the invisible dynamics governing the spread of these outbreaks and demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread. Findings are published in the journal eLife. (2019-01-02)

Mass. General study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators find that MRSA infection impairs the ability of lymphatic vessels to pump lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes in mouse models, which may contribute to the frequent recurrences of MRSA infection experienced by patients. (2018-01-17)

Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections
A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that use of oral vitamin D supplements bolsters production of a protective chemical normally found in the skin, and may help prevent skin infections that are a common result of atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema. (2008-10-06)

OU team develops new antibiotic to fight MRSA
A University of Oklahoma team of chemists has developed a new antibiotic formulation to fight the sometimes deadly staph infection caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA and other antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria. The new drug to treat MRSA combines traditional Food and Drug Administration-approved antibiotics, such as methicillin, with the polymer BPEI. (2016-05-18)

Positive Phase 2 results of NovaDigm TX's NDV-3A vaccine published in Clinical Infectious Diseases
NovaDigm Therapeutics, a company developing innovative immuno-therapeutics and preventative vaccines for fungal and bacterial infections, today announced the publication of data from a Phase 2a study of its NDV-3A vaccine program in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The data demonstrate that a single dose of NDV-3A with alum adjuvant was safe, well-tolerated, immunogenic and efficacious, leading to reduced recurrences of vaginitis in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). (2018-04-25)

Can we 'wipe out' MRSA?
A study by the Cardiff University's Welsh School of Pharmacy looked into the ability of antimicrobial-surface wipes to remove, kill and prevent the spread of such infections as MRSA. They found that current protocols utilised by hospital staff have the potential to spread pathogens after only the first use of a wipe, particularly due to the ineffectiveness of wipes to actually kill bacteria. (2008-06-03)

More severe bone infections, health complications in children linked to MRSA, researchers find
The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a major pathogen has led to more complications and longer hospital stays for children with acute bone infections, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. (2008-06-30)

Tampons can cause toxic shock syndrome
The use of intravaginal menstrual pads may be responsible for rare cases of menstrual toxic shock syndrome in women whose vaginas have been colonized by Staphylococcus aureus producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Menses can serve as a growth medium for S. aureus. (2018-04-20)

Risk of transmission of livestock-associated MRSA to non-farm dwellers is negligible
At a swine farm with pigs carrying methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, levels of MRSA among 95 percent of visitors became virtually undetectable only two hours after exposure. MRSA in the nasal passages was associated with exposure to airborne MRSA and not directly on physical contact with the animals. The research is published Sept. 29 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2017-09-29)

For patients with drug-resistant infections, infectious diseases experts may be lifesaving
Researchers analyzed records for approximately 4,200 patients with infections resistant to multiple antibiotics from 2006 to 2015 at one academic medical center. Thirty-day mortality rates were about 50 percent lower among patients with certain multidrug-resistant infections who had infectious diseases (ID) specialists involved in their care. Among patients with Enterobacteriaceae infections resistant to several antibiotics, an ID consultation was associated with a 59 percent reduction in 30-day mortality. (2018-03-23)

New Clorox disinfectant is EPA registered to kill both known types of MRSA
While MRSA has been an issue in health-care settings for years, CA-MRSA outbreaks in the community have been on the rise, with the greatest risk in community settings such as fitness clubs, in sports teams, at schools and daycare centers. In May, the Clorox Co. will launch Clorox Pro Quaternary All-Purpose Disinfectant Cleaner, a disinfectant that is EPA registered to kill germs, including Healthcare-associated and Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA). (2008-05-05)

Study shows nurses' scrubs become contaminated with bacteria in hospitals
Clothing worn by healthcare providers can become contaminated with bacteria, however having nurses wear scrubs with antimicrobial properties did not prevent this bacterial contamination from occurring, according to a study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2017-08-29)

MRSA colonization common in groin and rectal areas
Colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus allows people in the community to unknowingly harbor and spread this life-threatening bacteria. The inside of the front of the nose is where this bacteria is most predominant, but new research shows nearly all colonized individuals have this bacteria living in other body sites. The study was published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2014-08-13)

New compound as effective as FDA-approved drugs against life-threatening infections
Purdue University researchers have identified a new compound that in preliminary testing has shown itself to be as effective as antibiotics approved by the FDA to treat life-threatening infections while also appearing to be less susceptible to bacterial resistance. The compound has been potent against antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as MRSA, which is often found in hospitals and other health care settings, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus, with vancomycin long considered a drug of last resort. (2018-06-15)

Study finds MRSA in Midwestern swine, workers
The first study documenting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in swine and swine workers in the United States has been published by University of Iowa researchers. The investigators found a strain of MRSA known as ST398 in a swine production system in the Midwest. (2009-01-22)

Continuously killing bacteria on coated stainless steel -- add bleach to recharge
Stainless steel is the gold standard for kitchen appliances and cookware, but bacteria can grow on these surfaces, contaminating food. Current coatings available on the market are pricey and potentially harmful, so scientists have now developed an affordable specialized polymer coating for such surfaces that they can recharge with bleach treatments. The researchers are presenting their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-20)

Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms. The study is by Liya Lomsadze and colleagues from Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y., United States. (2019-04-12)

Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. (2019-04-18)

SLU researcher discovers how hibernating ribosomes wake up
Saint Louis University scientist Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., has uncovered the way a bacterial ribosome moves from an inactive to an active form, and how that 'wake up call' is key to its survival. (2017-09-12)

Combined resistance to multiple antibiotics: A growing problem in the EU
On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). In 2016, combined resistance to several antibiotic groups continued to increase for Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter species. This situation is of great concern as patients infected with these multidrug-resistant bacteria have very limited treatment options. (2017-11-15)

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