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Popular Statistical Analysis News and Current Events, Statistical Analysis News Articles.
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New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge. (2018-06-18)
How many types of neurons are there in the brain?
For decades, scientists have struggled to develop a comprehensive census of cell types in the brain. (2016-03-03)
Improving clinical trials with machine learning
Machine learning could improve our ability to determine whether a new drug works in the brain, potentially enabling researchers to detect drug effects that would be missed entirely by conventional statistical tests, finds a new UCL study published in Brain. (2017-11-15)
In communicating wildlife conservation, focus on the right message
If you want people to care about endangered species, focus on how many animals are left, not on the chances of a species becoming extinct, according to a new study by Cornell University communication scholars. (2016-10-31)
Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences. (2016-05-31)
Typical male brain anatomy associated with higher probability of autism spectrum disorder
A study of high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder suggests that characteristically male brain anatomy was associated with increased probability of ASD, according to a new article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. (2017-02-08)
Depression too often reduced to a checklist of symptoms
How can you tell if someone is depressed? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) -- the 'bible' of psychiatry -- diagnoses depression when patients tick off a certain number of symptoms on the DSM checklist. (2015-10-23)
Keeping an eye on the health of structures
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) used synthetic-aperture radar data from four different satellites, combined with statistical methods, to determine the structural deformation patterns of the largest bridge in Iran. (2018-04-12)
Early puberty linked with increased risk of obesity for women
Girls who start puberty earlier are more likely to be overweight as adults, finds new research from Imperial College London. (2018-03-15)
Is risk of fatal crashes increased on 4/20 counterculture holiday celebrating marijuana?
Bottom Line: The popular counterculture holiday '4/20' that celebrates marijuana was associated with an increased risk of fatal traffic crashes. (2018-02-12)
Yale cancer researchers propose new ways to select patients for clinical trials
Yale Cancer Center investigators have demonstrated in a new study that more sophisticated models to assess patient risk for cancer can result in better clinical trials with more definitive results. (2018-01-25)
Addressing food insecurity in health care settings
A review of articles covering food insecurity interventions in health care settings from 2000-2018 found that interventions focused on either referrals or direct provision of food or vouchers both suffered from poor follow-up, a general lack of comparison groups, and limited statistical power and generalizability. (2019-09-09)
Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel may contain hidden symbols of female anatomy
Publications on the works of Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel indicate that numerous codes and hidden messages may have been inserted for various purposes. (2016-08-31)
New research highlights ineffectiveness of 'wonder drug' for alcohol use disorders
A new study, published in the Addiction journal, conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool highlights the ineffectiveness of a specific drug treatment for alcohol use disorders. (2018-02-26)
Review examines everything we know about Internet gaming disorder
An analysis of all published articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk. (2018-04-10)
UK regional weather forecasts could be improved using jet stream data
Weather forecasters could be able to better predict regional rainfall and temperatures by using North Atlantic jet stream data, according to new research. (2018-01-30)
Study: Larger sample sizes needed to increase reproducibility in neuroscience studies
Small sample sizes in studies using functional MRI to investigate brain connectivity and function are common in neuroscience, despite years of warnings that such studies likely lack sufficient statistical power. (2018-06-07)
Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. (2015-09-29)
To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers must fuse climate science and biology
To predict how climate change will affect disease, researchers must fuse climate science and biology, according to a Princeton University review. (2017-09-18)
Parental enrollment in Medicaid yields increase in preventive health care for children
Enrolling in Medicaid may have health benefits not only for low-income parents but also for their children, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of over 50,000 parent-child pairs (2018-02-05)
At AAAS, Brown explains how statistics, neuroscience improve anesthesiology
Dr. Emery Brown, an MIT neuroscientist and MGH anesthesiologist, has combined scientific and statistical methods to put the brain at the center of anesthesiology practice. (2018-02-16)
Modern math sheds new light on long-standing debate about Viking-age Ireland conflict
Modern mathematical techniques -- similar to those used to analyze social-networking websites -- have allowed academics to shed new light on a centuries old debate surrounding the Viking age in Ireland and the famous battle of Clontarf in 1014. (2018-01-23)
Largest-ever study of thyroid cancer genetics finds new mutations, suggests immunotherapy
Data from 583 patient samples of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and 196 anaplastic thyroid cancers, show new genetic alterations, and 'high mutation burden' that is an FDA-approved marker for treatment with immunotherapy. (2018-04-26)
Twenty-five years of satellite data confirm rising sea levels
Satellite data predicts current acceleration rate will cause a dramatic rise in sea level by 2100. (2018-02-12)
Racial disparities in asthma related to health care access, environmental factors
In the United States, racial disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality can largely be explained by looking at socioeconomic and environmental factors, such as access to healthcare. (2019-01-11)
Tamoxifen chemoprevention tied to early detection of breast cancer
The drug tamoxifen does not prevent or treat estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, but it can make the disease easier to find, researchers report in the Oct. (2008-10-07)
How smelly is your rubbish?
A new method is being developed to assess the odorous impact of composting. (2018-01-24)
Weight gain in children has no association with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption
An analysis of 12 recent studies indicate that there is virtually no link between the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and teens. (2008-06-13)
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volume
Statistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. (2018-01-12)
Mysterious cosmic rays linked to galactic powerhouses
The sprawling Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory in South America has produced its first major discovery while still under construction. (2007-11-08)
Diagnosing the impacts of health policy
KAUST shows a new statistical technique offers a better way to gauge the effectiveness of complex healthcare interventions. (2017-11-20)
Evolution: In the beginning there was the sponge
Which group of animals evolved first? This problem has become a bone of contention among biologists. (2017-12-01)
Researchers identify common biological features of different types of asthma
Research can help to identify people with mild asthma from those with moderate or severe asthma. (2018-03-14)
Changes to nursing home quality ratings system caused consumers to choose better providers
Health care report cards and quality ratings are intended to give consumers more information when choosing a care provider like a hospital or nursing home. (2018-01-24)
Analysis challenges link between pain medications and inflammatory bowel disease
Contrary to generally accepted belief, a recent review and analysis of published studies did not reveal a consistent association between the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen and exacerbation of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (2018-04-05)
Crunching the data: New liver cancer subtypes revealed immunologically
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used substantial datasets on liver cancer patients to develop a new classification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) into three distinct subgroups with different genetic, immunological, and clinical features. (2019-02-01)
Study: There is almost no research on what distinguishes potential terrorists
A recent analysis of the existing research on factors associated with an individual's risk for engaging in terrorist activity highlights how little we know about these factors and the need for additional research in this area. (2017-09-25)
Sardines take us to the sources of biodiversity in the Amazon River
What is the origin of this abundance of species in the Amazon River? (2017-12-20)
Münster researchers identify factors promoting physical activity in childhood
Researchers at Münster University (Germany) show in a study published in the 'Scientific Reports' journal that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity. (2018-04-24)
Dengue 'hot spots' provide map to chikungunya and Zika outbreaks
Identifying dengue fever 'hot spots' can provide a predictive map for outbreaks of chikungunya and Zika -- two other viral diseases that, along with dengue, are spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. (2018-05-11)
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