Popular Stem Cells News and Current Events

Popular Stem Cells News and Current Events, Stem Cells News Articles.
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Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemia
A new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells. (2018-05-31)

Comprehensive pediatric CAR T guidelines developed by MD Anderson and PALISI
Almost one year after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI) today published treatment guidelines for managing the treatment in the online issue of Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology. (2018-08-06)

Zika vaccine shows promise for treating deadly brain cancer
An international team of researchers has successfully deployed a Zika virus vaccine to target and kill human glioblastoma brain cancer stem cells, which had been transplanted into mice. In a study published this week in mBio®, the team shows that a live, attenuated version of the Zika virus could form the basis of a new treatment option for this fatal brain cancer. (2018-09-18)

Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. The finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer. (2016-12-01)

Stem cell 'twins' to study disease
Researchers report a new gene editing method that can modify a single DNA base in the human genome with absolute precision. (2018-03-05)

Salk team reveals clues into early development of autism spectrum disorder
Researchers at the Salk Institute compared stem cells created from individuals with ASD against stem cells created from those without ASD to uncover, for the first time, measurable differences in the patterns and speed of development in the ASD-derived cells. (2019-01-07)

Approaching a decades-old goal: Making blood stem cells from patients' own cells
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have, for the first time, generated blood-forming stem cells in the lab using pluripotent stem cells, which can make virtually every cell type in the body. The advance, published today in the journal Nature, opens new avenues for research into the root causes of blood diseases and to creating immune-matched blood cells for treatment purposes, derived from patients' own cells. (2017-05-17)

Dangerous wheat disease jumps Red Sea
A new form of stem rust, a virulent wheat disease, has jumped from eastern Africa and is now infecting wheat in Yemen in the Arabian Peninsula. (2007-01-16)

New research finds novel method for generating airway cells from stem cells
Researchers have developed a new approach for growing and studying cells they hope one day will lead to curing lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis through 'personalized medicine.' (2017-03-30)

CNIC scientists develop new methods for analyzing gene function
Scientists at the CNIC have developed new methods to produce and analyze genetic mosaics. In these mosaics, tissues contain various groups of cells with different known genotypes, permitting study of the differences that these genotypes generate in cell behavior. (2017-08-10)

Scaling up tissue engineering
A team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has invented a method for 3-D bioprinting thick vascularized tissue constructs composed of human stem cells, extracellular matrix, and circulatory channels lined with endothelial blood vessel cells. The resulting network of vasculature contained within these deep tissues enables fluids, nutrients and cell growth factors to be controllably perfused uniformly throughout the tissue. (2016-03-07)

Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. (2017-01-25)

Purest yet liver-like cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells
A team of researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere has found a better way to purify liver cells made from induced pluripotent stem cells. This new methodology could facilitate progress toward an important clinical goal: the treatment of patients with disease-causing mutations in their livers by transplant of unmutated liver cells derived from their own stem cells. (2016-08-29)

Scientists take aging cardiac stem cells out of semiretirement to improve stem cell therapy
With age, the chromosomes of our cardiac stem cells compress as they move into a state of safe, semiretirement. (2016-10-03)

A protein that stem cells require could be a target in killing breast cancer cells
Researchers have identified a protein that must be present in order for mammary stem cells to perform their normal functions. When the researchers genetically removed or chemically inhibited the protein, called BPTF, stem cells could no longer maintain their 'renewing' state and began to take on the character of specialized breast cells, and soon died. Breast cancer cells with stem-like properties could have the same weakness. (2017-06-01)

Pancreas on a chip
'Islet-on-a-chip' offers continuous monitoring of insulin-producing cells, indicating whether they have therapeutic value and are suitable for transplant. Miniature, automated, easy-to-use device improves decision making for clinicians. New method streamlines fundamental research into insulin-producing cells and insulin-stimulating compounds, and improves drug screening. (2019-08-29)

A protein makes the difference
It is well-established knowledge that blood vessels foster the growth of tumors. Preventing the formation of tumors is a standard part of cancer therapy. A study by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has discovered a new, surprising role played by blood vessels: under certain conditions they can inhibit tumor growth. (2016-10-18)

Stem cells from diabetic patients coaxed to become insulin-secreting cells
Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. The new discovery suggests a personalized treatment approach to diabetes may be on the horizon -- one that relies on the patients' own stem cells to manufacture new cells that make insulin. (2016-05-10)

Stem cell scientists discover genetic switch to increase supply of stem cells from cord blood
International stem cell scientists, co-led in Canada by Dr. John Dick and in the Netherlands by Dr. Gerald de Haan, have discovered the switch to harness the power of cord blood and potentially increase the supply of stem cells for cancer patients needing transplantation therapy to fight their disease. (2016-07-14)

Mature heart muscle cells created in the laboratory from stem cells
Generating mature and viable heart muscle cells from human or other animal stem cells has proven difficult for biologists. (2017-01-26)

Cholesterol-like molecules switch off the engine in cancer-targeting Natural Killer cells
The engine used by cancer-killing 'Natural Killer' cells is turned on by a protein called Srebp, which can be blocked by certain sterols like cholesterol. Tumor cells can produce oxysterols and cholesterol levels tend to be higher in people with obesity. (2017-09-18)

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)

New materials could 'drive wound healing' by harnessing natural healing methods
Imperial researchers have developed new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing. (2019-01-07)

DNA 'tattoos' link adult, daughter stem cells in planarians
Using the molecular equivalent of a tattoo on DNA that adult stem cells pass to their (2008-09-10)

Heart cell defect identified as possible cause of heart failure in pregnancy
A new Tel Aviv University study reveals that one of the possible primary causes of heart failure in pregnant women is a functional heart cell defect. The findings may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. (2019-01-02)

Mutations in bone cells can drive leukemia in neighboring stem cells
DNA mutations in bone cells that support blood development can drive leukemia formation in nearby blood stem cells. This neighbor cell effect was observed in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome. In mice, drugs can stop the effect and potentially could combat leukemia progression/recurrence. (2016-10-26)

Activating genes on demand
A new approach developed by Harvard geneticist George Church, Ph.D., can help uncover how tandem gene circuits dictate life processes, such as the healthy development of tissue or the triggering of a particular disease, and can also be used for directing precision stem cell differentiation for regenerative medicine and growing organ transplants. (2015-03-04)

Study shows functional effects of human stem cell delivery to heart muscle after heart attack
Researchers delivered human stem cells seeded in biological sutures to the damaged heart muscles of rats following induced acute myocardial infarction and assessed the effects on cardiac function one week later. The differences in mechanical function at a local and global level when stem cell seeded sutures were used compared to sutures without stem cells are reported in an article in BioResearch Open Access. (2016-10-19)

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehicles
Creating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice. (2018-03-12)

Advanced therapy offers cure for relapsed cancer patient
Testicular cancer patients who do not respond to traditional therapy can be cured with high-dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant, according to an Indiana University School of Medicine study by Lawrence Einhorn, M.D.; Stephen Williams, M.D.; Rafat Abonour, M.D., and colleagues published in the July 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Although the number of relapsed testicular cancer patients in the US is small, the IU Simon Cancer Center treats a majority of them. (2007-07-25)

Scientists culture human placenta stem cells for first time
Scientists have derived and grown trophoblast stem cells for the first time, which will lead to better understanding of the human placenta. (2018-01-24)

Researchers identify key factor for reprogramming adult cells into stem cells
In a new Cell Reports paper, a team led by John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., of the Houston Methodist Research Institute, has identified and characterized a biological factor critical to the transformation of adult somatic cells (cells that are not sperm or egg cells) into stem cells. (2016-04-21)

Your gender may affect how you perceive a woman's anxiety in STEM
Undergraduate students' reactions to reading about a woman's anxiety in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) class vary by gender according to a Dartmouth-led study published in the Psychology of Women Quarterly. Men are more likely than women to attribute a female student's anxiety or self-doubt in a STEM class to internal factors such as not being prepared while women are more likely than men to attribute such emotions to external factors, such as bias. (2018-03-16)

Siamab Therapeutics announces publication of new data on its ST1 lead program in the journal Oncotarget
Siamab Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing novel glycan-targeted cancer therapeutics, today announced the publication of new preclinical data. (2018-05-01)

Scientists use gene editing to eliminate viruses in live pigs
Scientists have edited the pig genome to deactivate a family of retroviruses. The results hold important implications for transplant medicine in humans. (2017-08-10)

Breakthrough in the production of dopamine neurons for Parkinson's disease
Researchers at Lund University, Sweden, are rapidly moving towards the first ever transplantations of embryonic stem cell derived dopamine neurons in persons with Parkinson's disease. New findings published in Cell Stem Cell present how a more refined understanding of normal development leads to an improved method for obtaining the dopamine neurons needed for the first clinical trials. (2016-10-28)

Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behavior
Researchers at University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science report the first direct observation of atoms moving in liquid by collaborating with National Institute of Materials Science. Using scanning transmission electron microscopy, they find that gold ions diffuse through ionic liquid by a phenomenon they describe as a 'cage-jump.' Image analysis determined the diffusion coefficient and activation energy of the diffusion. Quantification of liquid at the atomic level is expected to contribute to the design of energy efficient devices. (2017-12-15)

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertility
A UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male infertility. Findings set the stage for chickens as a more prominent model organism for stem cell research. (2018-04-30)

Neurons modulate the growth of blood vessels
A team of researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology shake at the foundations of a dogma of cell biology. By detailed series of experiments, they proved that blood vessel growth is modulated by neurons and not, as assumed so far, through a control mechanism of the vessel cells among each other. The results are groundbreaking for research into and treatment of vascular diseases, tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. The study will be published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications. (2017-01-10)

Drug suppresses spread of breast cancer caused by stem-like cells
Rare stem-like tumor cells play a critical role in the spread of breast cancer, but a vulnerability in the pathway that powers them offers a strategy to target these cells using existing drugs before metastatic disease occurs, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers. (2017-12-11)

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