Popular Strategy News and Current Events

Popular Strategy News and Current Events, Strategy News Articles.
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Fragmented turtles
Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia. (2019-05-09)

Reimagined US-Middle East strategy would lean less on arms sales, more on dev't/governance
US policies in the Middle East need to be rethought, according to a new RAND Corporation report. If policymakers were to pursue an alternative strategy outlined by RAND researchers, they would rebalance America's support by prioritizing non-security investments in development and improved governance, which could enhance regional stability. (2021-02-23)

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Reducing sugar content in sugar-sweetened drinks by 40 percent over 5 years could prevent 1.5 million cases of overweight and obesity in the UK and 300,000 cases of diabetes
A new study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal suggests that reducing sugar content in sugar sweetened drinks (including fruit juices) in the UK by 40 percent over five years, without replacing them with any artificial sweeteners, could prevent 500,000 cases of overweight and 1 million cases of obesity, in turn preventing around 300,000 cases of type 2 diabetes, over two decades. The study is by Professor Graham MacGregor* and colleagues at Queen Mary University of London, UK. (2016-01-06)

'Filter' hones GWAS results to help researchers avoid dead ends
A genetics research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine has solved a dilemma facing researchers who use genomewide association studies (GWAS) by developing a new approach that strategically 'filters' which genes are worth further study. The researchers hope this strategy will accelerate the study of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and even addiction by helping researchers avoid 'dead-end paths.' They are optimistic that this strategy will gain widespread use and will save researchers time and money. (2018-03-05)

Sussex research reveals brain mechanism involved in language learning
Psychologists found that when we learn the names of unfamiliar objects, brain regions involved in learning actively predict the objects the names correspond to. (2018-03-15)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

Protein analysis may reveal new cancer treatment targets
Researchers have used lab technology called mass spectrometry to study the proteins expressed by human cancer cells. (2018-06-15)

To starve pancreatic tumors, researchers seek to block 'self-eating,' other fuel sources
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and their collaborators are reporting preclinical findings for a potential two-treatment strategy to block multiple mechanisms of cancer cell metabolism in pancreatic cancer at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting in Chicago. The findings will be presented from 8 a.m. to noon on Wednesday. (2018-04-13)

One-month worth of memory training results in 30 minutes
A significant part of working memory training effects is a result of a fast development of task-specific strategies during training, rather than an increase in working memory capacity. (2018-03-07)

When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
Why do some consumers make choices based on their feelings instead of rational assessments? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers who consider themselves independent are more inclined to rely on feelings when making decisions. (2015-03-31)

Treatment for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients
Treatments for the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis usually include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab, cyclophosphamide and tumor resection. The researchers aimed to compare the efficacy of the treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab or cyclophosphamide for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients without tumor and to discuss potential biomarkers for this disease. (2018-03-14)

New World Health Organization strategy aims to halve the global impact of snakebite
New strategy aims to ensure safe, effective and affordable treatment for all; empower communities at all levels to take proactive action; strengthen health systems to deliver better outcomes; build a global coalition of partners to coordinate action and mobilise resources. (2019-02-22)

Trust is good, quantum trickery is better
An international team of scientists prove, for the first time, the security of so-called device-independent quantum cryptography in a regime that is attainable with state-of-the-art quantum technology, thus paving the way to practical realization of such schemes in which users don not have to worry whether their devices can be trusted or not. (2018-01-31)

Align funding with innovations in health care to improve patient outcomes
To encourage innovation in health care, governments need to move away from current siloed funding to funding that encourages collaboration among providers in managing patients who need care in a variety of settings, argue the authors of an analysis in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Study results may lead to improved diagnostics for breast cancer
A study in Molecular Oncology indicates that examining the protein and RNA in leftover materials from routine diagnostic tests for breast cancer may lead to more accurate diagnoses. (2018-07-18)

Terrorism research must be driven by evidence, not political agendas
Despite concerted efforts by many people and institutions, fundamental aspects of terrorism -- identifying participants, understanding how they radicalize, and developing effective countermeasures -- remain unclear. Four experts from different fields propose a strategy for terrorism research that calls for theoretically informed field research that is inclusive to all disciplines and linked with policy-making. The approach is meant to protect the integrity of academic research from political interference, while protecting policy makers from simplistic academic accounts. (2017-01-26)

'Smart' contact lenses monitor glucose levels in tears
A soft, flexible contact lens can monitor glucose levels in tears and deliver sensing results through the lens display, according to a new report, alerting the user if glucose levels are too high by turning off a tiny embedded LED light. The authors say their approach, tested in rabbits, is the first to apply the display pixel into a soft contact lens to visualize glucose sensing. (2018-01-24)

Canada needs a national suicide prevention strategy
Canada needs a national suicide prevention strategy, and it should be included in the 2017 federal budget, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2016-09-06)

Looking for better customer engagement value? Be more strategic on social media
According to a new study from the University of Vaasa and University of Cyprus, the mere use of social media alone does not generate customer value, but rather, the connections and interactions between the firm and its customers -- as well as among customers themselves -- can be used strategically for resource transformation and exchanges between the interacting parties. The study was recently published in one of the world's leading journals in marketing field -- Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. (2020-06-25)

New strategy expands the benefits of Internet-delivered CBT
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have experimented with a new adaptive treatment strategy for Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) that identifies patients within the first month who face a major risk of treatment failure. Published in the scientific journal American Journal of Psychiatry, the results also suggest that such patients may nevertheless benefit if their treatment is adjusted to accommodate their specific needs and challenges. (2019-01-30)

Multiplayer video games: Researchers discover link between skill and intelligence
Researchers at the University of York have discovered a link between young people's ability to perform well at two popular video games and high levels of intelligence. (2017-11-15)

Group B streptococcus test for pregnant women: advantage of universal screening unclear
Informative studies are still lacking for the comparison with the currently used risk-based strategy. (2019-02-05)

A bird in the bush equals money in the hand
A new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Foundations of Success (FOS) finds that an ecotourism strategy based on 'direct payments,' where local people are compensated for the amount of wildlife seen by tourists, has resulted in a reduction in illegal hunting and an increase in wildlife sightings. (2018-03-01)

Russian blue chips prove their pricing potential
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and London Business School have carried out research into the dynamics of the prices for Russian companies' stocks and depositary receipts. The research indicates that, thanks to their price differences, there are opportunities for profitable trading with zero or, at least, minimum risk. (2019-04-19)

Study shows approach can help English learners improve at math word problems
University of Kansas education professors have published a study showing that a comprehension-based strategy can help English learners improve their math word-problem solving abilities. The approach boosts reading comprehension and problem solving as well. (2018-06-19)

Achieving sugar reduction targets could cut child obesity and healthcare costs
Reducing the sugar content of certain foods by 2020, in line with UK government policy targets, could cut child obesity and related illness, and save the NHS in England £286 million over 10 years, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-04-17)

Making new layered superconductors using high entropy alloys
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created new superconductors made of layers of bismuth sulfide (BiS2) and a high entropy rare earth alloy oxyfluoride, containing five different rare earth elements at the same crystallographic site. The new material retains superconducting properties over a wider range of lattice parameters than materials without high-entropy-alloy states. Their work promises an exciting new strategy for designing new layered superconductors, a potentially key development in the search for high-temperature superconductors. (2018-05-04)

Green rooves to reduce the effects of climate change
it would be necessary to have between 207 and 740 hectares of green rooves in a city like Seville (Spain), depending on the scenario that is contemplated, to reduce the effects of climate change in relation to the maximum temperature rises of between 1.5 and 6 ºC that are estimated by the end of the century. This would require between 11 and 40 percent of the buildings in the city (2017-11-10)

Sleep may help eyewitnesses from choosing innocent suspects
Sleep may influence an eyewitness's ability to correctly pick a guilty person out of a police lineup, indicates a study by Michigan State University researchers. (2017-09-06)

Gene amplification -- the fast track to infection
Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden are first to discover that bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes which are needed to rapidly cause infection. The results were published in Science on June 30, 2016. (2016-06-30)

Greater access to information reduces unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions
A new study in the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy suggests that providing more information about how doctors prescribe drugs could reduce problems associated with overprescription. (2019-01-23)

Public health-primary care testing has high uptake, doesn't identify hidden Hepatitis C
Public health-primary care testing has high uptake, doesn't identify hidden Hepatitis C. (2018-01-09)

Childhood cancer: The four survival strategies of tumor cells
Cancer cells in children tend to develop by following four main trajectories -- and two of them are linked to relapse of the disease, research led by Lund University in Sweden shows. The four strategies can occur simultaneously in a single tumor, according to the study that is now published in Nature Genetics. (2018-06-04)

WSU researchers see cognitive changes in offspring of heavy cannabis-using rats
Washington State University researchers have seen cognitive changes in the offspring of rats exposed to heavy amounts of cannabis. Their work is one of the rare studies to look at the effects of cannabis during pregnancy. The drug is the most commonly used illicit substance among pregnant women. (2018-11-04)

What algae can tell us about political strategy
Cells compete for nutrients. Political campaigns compete for voters. According to new research published in Nature Scientific Reports, general principles may begin to explain how differing strategies play out where groups compete for resources. (2017-08-10)

Environmental impact of electric vehicles in China? It depends on how they are charged
Electric vehicles play a key role in China's plan to improve air quality and reduce CO2 emissions but, with the majority of China's electricity still coming from coal-fired power plants, many question just how effective this strategy will be. Now, researchers have found that how electric vehicles are charged -- whether in the low-energy slow mode or high-energy fast mode -- plays a significant role in the reduction of CO2 and the integration of wind energy. (2018-05-01)

Optimal timing of invasive evaluation after heart attack examined in randomized trial
The optimal timing of invasive evaluation after a heart attack has been examined in a randomised trial. The late breaking results from the VERDICT trial are presented today in a Hot Line Session at ESC Congress 2018. (2018-08-28)

The common wisdom about marketing cocreated innovations is wrong
A new study in the Journal of Marketing finds that companies can improve consumer adoption and accelerate product takeoff of cocreated innovations through a novel communication strategy that creates inconsistency or a mismatch between the creator's and the company's messages. (2019-06-10)

New method to stop cells dividing could help fight cancer
Researchers at Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet, and the University of Oxford, have used a new strategy to shut down specific enzymes to stop cells from dividing. The method, published in Cell Chemical Biology, can be used as a strategy to fight cancer. (2018-01-18)

Tuberculosis bacteria find their ecological niche
An international team of researchers have isolated and analyzed genetically tuberculosis bacteria from several thousand patients from over a hundred countries. This analysis demonstrates that the tuberculosis bacteria vary in their ecological niche. Whereas the so-called generalists occur all around the world, the specialists are only found in certain geographical regions. This finding, published in the renowned journal Nature Genetics, could further complicate the development of novel tuberculosis vaccines. (2016-11-03)

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