Popular Strawberries News and Current Events

Popular Strawberries News and Current Events, Strawberries News Articles.
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Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
Richard Sowers, a professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a team of students have developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand. (2018-03-13)

Strawberry fields ripe for the picking
A team of researchers from the University of Maryland, Utah State University, and the US Department of Agriculture compared three different strawberry production systems over a two-year period (2003-2004) to determine which system was preferred by consumers who frequented pick-your-own farms. (2007-12-06)

Solar greenhouses generate electricity and grow healthy crops
Crops grown in electricity-generating solar greenhouses were as healthy as those raised in conventional ones, signaling the promise of this 'smart' technology. (2017-11-03)

Fruits, vegetables and teas may protect smokers from lung cancer, UCLA researchers report
Tobacco smokers who eat three servings of fruits and vegetables per day and drink green or black tea may be protecting themselves from lung cancer, according to a first-of-its-kind study by UCLA cancer researchers. (2008-05-28)

Xylitol reduces risk of cavities
The sugar substitute xylitol affects the bacterial composition of the oral cavity even in low doses. On the other hand, a relatively high intake is needed to counteract the production of acid between the teeth, according to Pernilla Lif Holgerson in the dissertation she will defend at Umeå University in Sweden on February 23. (2007-02-15)

Mix and match microbes to make probiotics last
Scientists have tried to alter the human gut microbiota to improve health by introducing beneficial probiotic bacteria. Yet commercially available probiotics do not establish themselves in the gut. A study published Sept. 29 in Cell Host & Microbe suggests that it is possible to alter the microbial ecosystem in the human gut for at least six months by introducing a single, ecologically appropriate bacterial strain. (2016-10-03)

Yeast adaptation study finds diploids evolve more slowly than haploids
A team of Lehigh University set out to answer a basic question: how do the rates of adaptation differ between haploid and diploid organisms? They found that diploids--with two copies of the genome--evolve more slowly than haploids--with only one copy. They also that the beneficial mutations diploids pick up look different compared to what is seen in haploids. Their results have been published in a paper in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2018-03-26)

Behavioral biology: Ripeness is all
In contrast to other members of the Drosophila family, the spotted-wing fly D. suzukii deposits its eggs in ripe fruits. Biologists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have now elucidated the sensory basis of their ability to exploit a novel ecological niche. (2017-03-10)

Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plants
A new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit. (2018-01-22)

Research characterizes evolution of pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development. Two groups of sRNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers. One of these pathways for sRNA production, previously believed present in grasses and related monocots, has now been demonstrated to be present widely in the flowering plants, evolved over 200 million years ago, and is arguably one of the evolutionary innovations that made them so successful. (2019-02-11)

Allergy potential of strawberries and tomatoes depends on the variety
Strawberries and tomatoes are among the most widely consumed fruits and vegetables worldwide. However, many people are allergic to them, especially if they have been diagnosed with birch pollen allergy. A team from the Technical University of Munich has investigated which strawberry or tomato varieties contain fewer allergens than others and to what extent cultivation or preparation methods are involved. (2018-07-13)

Size matters: How thrips choose their partners
The bigger the male, the higher his chances to successfully mate -- this applies, at least, to thrips, insects that are hard to recognise with the naked eye. The larger males not only drive off their smaller rivals, they also have better immune systems and produce more sperm. This is a discovery that was made by biologists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) that recently appeared in the international Journal of Insect Behaviour. (2017-11-08)

Study shows that the consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
A lower risk of type 2 diabetes has been observed among individuals consuming food rich in antioxidants. This effect is largely contributed by fruit, vegetables, tea and other hot beverages, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol, as shown in a recent study from an Inserm research group, published in Diabetologia. (2017-11-09)

First study on physical properties of giant cancer cells may inform new treatments
Giant cancer cells are much larger and stiffer than other cancer cells and move further, study shows. (2018-08-13)

Where do the best strawberries grow?
Agricultural production benefits enormously from flower-visiting bees and other insects. Hedgerows and the edges of forests represent important habitats for pollinators. A team from the University of Göttingen investigated whether hedgerows and their proximity to forests might affect the pollination of strawberries. In fact, both the weight and the quality of strawberries increased when plants were at hedgerows or hedgerows next to forests. The results were published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. (2019-02-04)

Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields (2019-06-14)

Chameleon inspires 'smart skin' that changes color in the sun
Chemists used photonic crystals to develop a flexible smart skin that reacts to heat and sunlight while maintaining a near constant volume. (2019-09-11)

Low-maintenance strawberry may be good crop to grow in space
Astronauts could one day tend their own crops on long space missions, and Purdue University researchers have found a healthy candidate to help satisfy a sweet tooth -- a strawberry that requires little maintenance and energy. (2010-05-03)

Fighting the crave for fattening food? Just surround yourself in its scent
A new study proves one sense can compensate another. (2019-01-16)

What's that smell? Scientists find a new way to understand odors
Scientists from the Salk Institute and Arizona State University have discovered a new way to organize odor molecules based on how often they occur together in nature, and to map this data to discover regions of odor combinations humans find most pleasurable. (2018-08-29)

Kiwifruit duplicated its vitamin C genes twice, 50 million and 20 million years ago
Today's kiwifruit, a member of the Chinese gooseberry family, contains about as much vitamin C as an orange. This extra boost in vitamin C production is the result of the kiwifruit's ancestors' spontaneously duplicating their DNA in two separate evolutionary events approximately 50-57 million and 18-20 million years ago, as reported September 20 in the journal iScience. (2018-09-20)

Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries
The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex. (2018-09-10)

Carnegie Mellon engineers develop machine that visually inspects and sorts strawberry plants
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's National Robotics Engineering Center have developed a plant-sorting machine that uses computer vision and machine learning to inspect and grade harvested strawberry plants and then mechanically sort them by quality -- tasks that until now could only be done manually. (2009-12-17)

Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon
Inflammatory bowel disease is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Researchers are now reporting that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry -- or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries -- a day could help keep the doctor away. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

Optimizing strawberry yield in vertical farming
Experiments conducted at two locations in Illinois compared 11 strawberry cultivars, three soilless media mixtures, and three nutrient sources. Strawberry yield was greatest when grown in perlite mixed with coco coir or vermiculite and fertilized with a synthetic nutrient source. Yield was reduced by up to 15 percent when fertilized with a bio-based, liquid nutrient source and vermicompost mixed with soilless media. Florida Radiance, Monterey, Evie 2, Portola, and Seascape were recommended as high-yielding strawberry cultivars. (2016-10-10)

The prospects of american strawberries
A team of 12 researchers from 10 different states embarked on an academic journey designed to generate an effective guideline essential for research, policy, and marketing strategies for the strawberry industry across the country, and to enable the development of general and region-specific educational and production tools. (2019-02-15)

Set strawberry alarm clock for post-apple bloom
Growers who time their strawberries to bloom just after apples do, can reap a better harvest, according to new research. (2017-04-03)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Antioxidants in Midwestern black raspberries influenced by production site
Black raspberries have been studied for decades by scientists and medical researchers interested in the fruits' apparent ability to limit the onset or severity of degenerative diseases, including cancer. The prospective health benefits of black raspberries and other antioxidant-rich produce has led to increased consumer awareness and demand for fresh, locally produced fruit. This lead researchers to investigate whether antioxidant levels are influenced by where black raspberries are grown. (2009-02-26)

Intake of pesticide residue from fruits, vegetables and infertility treatment outcomes
Eating more fruits and vegetables with high-pesticide residue was associated with a lower probability of pregnancy and live birth following infertility treatment for women using assisted reproductive technologies. (2017-10-30)

Breeding a better strawberry
An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits. (2019-02-25)

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees
For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them. (2019-05-01)

Researcher discovers pathway plants use to fight back against pathogens
Plants are not only smart, but they also wage a good fight, according to a University of Missouri biochemist. Previous studies have shown that plants can sense attacks by pathogens and activate their defenses. However, it has not been known what happens between the pathogen attacks and the defense activation, until now. A new MU study revealed a very complex process that explains how plants counter attack pathogens. This discovery could potentially lead to crops with enhanced disease resistance. (2008-03-31)

Going my way? We think so, if we really want to get there, NYU study finds
Whether we're buying a ticket to a movie, catching a train, or shopping for groceries, the more committed we are to achieving that goal, the more likely we are to assume others have exactly the same objective, a study by New York University researchers shows. (2015-05-18)

Silk keeps fruit fresh without refrigeration, according to Tufts study
Tufts University biomedical engineers have demonstrated that fruits can stay fresh for more than a week without refrigeration if they are coated in an odorless, biocompatible silk solution so thin as to be virtually invisible. The approach is a promising avenue for preservation of delicate foods using a naturally derived material and a water-based manufacturing process. (2016-05-06)

Refrigerator us warm?
A discovery made at RUDN University allows to substantially increase the production of high-quality planting material of horticultural crops. (2016-09-06)

A visual nudge can disrupt recall of what things look like
Interfering with your vision makes it harder to describe what you know about the appearance of even common objects, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2016-08-26)

Flavonoids from fruits and vegetables may help with weight maintenance
Eating fruit and vegetables that contain high levels of flavonoids, such as apples, pears, and berries, may be associated with less weight gain, suggests findings from a study published in The BMJ today. (2016-01-27)

Bioactive compounds in berries can reduce high blood pressure
Eating blueberries can guard against high blood pressure, according to new research by the University of East Anglia and Harvard University. (2011-01-14)

Deciding to stay or go is a deep-seated brain function
Foraging creatures decide at some point that the food source they're working on is no richer than the rest of the patch and that it's time to move on and find something better. Duke researchers have now found an area of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) that seems to be integral to this decision, firing with increasing activity until a threshold is reached, whereupon the animal decides it's time to move on. (2011-06-06)

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