Popular Subduction Zones News and Current Events

Popular Subduction Zones News and Current Events, Subduction Zones News Articles.
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Earthquake symmetry
A recent study investigated around 100,000 localized seismic events to search for patterns in the data. University of Tokyo Professor Satoshi Ide discovered that earthquakes of differing magnitudes have more in common than was previously thought. This suggests development of early warning systems may be more difficult than hoped. But conversely, similarities between some events indicate that predictable characteristics may aid researchers attempting to forecast seismic events. (2019-09-04)

Wildfire risk doesn't douse housing demand
Demand for real estate rebounds in high-risk areas within one to two years of a wildfire, UNLV study finds. Here's what the research may mean for homeowners in California and beyond. (2018-08-27)

The efficiency of nature-inspired metaheuristics in limited-budget expensive global optimization
Global optimization problems where evaluation of the objective function is an expensive operation arise frequently in engineering, machine learning, decision making, statistics, optimal control, etc. (2018-03-22)

How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the long run. (2018-02-14)

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. (2019-03-27)

Scientists use seismic waves to locate missing rock under Tibet
Geologists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have located a huge chunk of Earth's lithosphere that went missing 15 million years ago. By finding the massive block of errant rock beneath Tibet, the researchers are helping solve a long-standing mystery, and clarifying how continents behave when they collide. (2007-02-07)

Influenza in the tropics shows variable seasonality
Whilst countries in the tropics and subtropics exhibit diverse patterns of seasonal flu activity, they can be grouped into eight geographical zones to optimise vaccine formulation and delivery timing, according to a study published April 27, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2016-04-27)

Road pricing most effective in reducing vehicle emissions
For decades municipal and regional governments have used various traffic management strategies to reduce vehicle emissions, alongside advancements like cleaner fuel and greener cars. But not all traffic management strategies are created equal, says UBC transportation expert and civil engineering professor Alexander Bigazzi. After reviewing more than 60 studies on the subject, Bigazzi has concluded that road pricing -- or pay per use -- is the most effective strategy to reduce emissions and traffic. (2017-10-05)

Mexico's 2017 earthquake emerged from a growing risk zone
Under Mexico, where the Cocos Plate from the Pacific Ocean slides under the North American Plate, a bending line of hills, created when the seafloor first formed, sits atop a flattened area of subduction. That newly recognized combination, scientists report, has created a fault that likely explains last September's Puebla earthquake, scientists report. (2018-03-12)

Permian volcanism contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gas content in Antarctica
The Choiyoi magmatic Province, with an estimated volume of ~1.3 million square kilometers, represents a voluminous Permian subduction-related volcanic episode that has thus far been described only from South America. In their new paper for Lithosphere, Demian Nelson and John Cottle investigated Permian volcaniclastic rocks from central Antarctica to determine the potential magmatic source of volcanic detritus in southwestern Gondwana. (2019-04-02)

A series of fortunate events
Volcanism is sometimes like food poisoning, where the Earth spews forth unstable material. New research from Michigan Technological University, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and ETH Zurich shows that a significant pulse of volatile carbon was released from the Earth's mantle around 500 million years ago. But why? (2017-11-27)

Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care
A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system. (2018-07-10)

Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of years
Current global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers at Geozentrum Nordbayern at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases. (2018-05-17)

New study analyzes volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before
Building on existing information and databases relating to volcanic fatalities, scientists from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, been able to classify victims by activity or occupation and look at the distance of their death from the volcano. (2017-10-06)

West Coast waters returning to normal but salmon catches lagging
Ocean conditions off most of the US West Coast are returning roughly to average, after an extreme marine heat wave from about 2014 to 2016 disrupted the California Current Ecosystem and shifted many species beyond their traditional range, according to a new report from NOAA Fisheries' two marine laboratories on the West Coast. Some warm waters remain off the Pacific Northwest, however. (2018-03-09)

Hurricane Harvey: Dutch-Texan research shows most fatalities occurred outside flood zones
Scientists found that most Houston-area drowning deaths from Hurricane Harvey occurred outside the zones designated by government as being at higher risk of flooding: the 100- and 500-year floodplains. Harvey, one of the costliest storms in US history, hit Texas on Aug. 25, 2017, causing unprecedented flooding and killing dozens. Researchers at Delft University of Technology and Rice University published their results today in the European Geosciences Union journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. (2018-04-19)

Seafloor sediments appear to enhance Earthquake and Tsunami danger in Pacific Northwest
The Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of the Pacific Northwest has all the ingredients for making powerful earthquakes -- and according to the geological record, the region is due for its next 'big one.' A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that the occurrence of these big, destructive quakes and associated devastating tsunamis may be linked to compact sediments along large portions of the subduction zone. (2017-11-20)

Distant earthquakes can cause underwater landslides
New research finds large earthquakes can trigger underwater landslides thousands of miles away, weeks or months after the quake occurs. (2017-06-27)

Discovery of hidden earthquake presents challenge to earthquake early-warning systems
Seismologists at the University of Liverpool studying the 2011 Chile earthquake have discovered a previously undetected earthquake which took place seconds after the initial rupture. This newly discovered phenomena which they called a `closely-spaced doublet' presents a challenge to earthquake and tsunami early warning systems as it increases the risk of larger-than-expected tsunamis in the aftermath of a typical subduction earthquake. (2015-11-16)

Dissection of the 2015 Bonin deep earthquake
Researchers at Tohoku University's Department of Geophysics, have been studying the deep earthquake which occurred on May 30, 2015, to the west of Japan's Bonin Islands. (2017-03-15)

Seismologists introduce new measure of earthquake ruptures
A team of seismologists has developed a new measurement of seismic energy release that can be applied to large earthquakes. Called the Radiated Energy Enhancement Factor (REEF), it provides a measure of earthquake rupture complexity that better captures variations in the amount and duration of slip along the fault for events that may have similar magnitudes. (2018-03-21)

Reefs help protect vulnerable Caribbean fish from climate change
New research from UBC's Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries suggests that larger reef areas may help protect the Caribbean's coral reef fish communities from the impacts of ocean warming. (2018-03-16)

Sheep show the contamination by microplastics in the agricultural soils of Murcia
A team from the Diverfarming project has found microplastics in 92% of the faeces of sheep fed in intensive agricultural zones of Murcia that they analysed (2020-11-25)

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide
Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study by Smithsonian scientists published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone -- a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life -- rather than by ocean warming or acidification. (2017-03-20)

Release of water shakes Pacific Plate at depth
A team of seismologists analyzing the data from 671 earthquakes that occurred between 30 and 280 miles beneath the Earth's surface in the Pacific Plate as it descended into the Tonga Trench were surprised to find a zone of intense earthquake activity in the downgoing slab. The pattern of the activity along the slab provided strong evidence that the earthquakes are sparked by the release of water at depth. (2017-01-11)

How did plate tectonics start on Earth?
Hot mantle plume rising to the lithosphere induced the first large-scale sinking of lithospheric plates. (2015-11-11)

Trading farmland for nitrogen protection
Excess nitrogen from agricultural runoff can enter surface waters with devastating effects. Algal blooms and fish kills are a just a couple of possible consequences. But riparian buffer zones -- areas of grasses, perennials, or trees -- between farmlands and streams or rivers can help. (2016-08-03)

The search for the earthquake nucleus
Where a tectonic plate dives under another, in the so-called subduction zones at ocean margins, many strong earthquakes occur. Especially the earthquakes at shallow depths often cause tsunamis. How exactly are such earthquakes initiated? Which rock composition favors a break in the earth's interior that can lead to such natural disasters? A recent study points to earthquake nucleation in calcareous sediments. (2016-08-01)

WSU researchers taking sustainability of organic farming to new level
Washington State University researchers have received a $1.5 million federal grant to help organic farmers keep a better account of their ecological footprint. Seven researchers in the WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, Biosystems Engineering and USDA Agricultural Research Service will focus in particular on carbon and nitrogen -- two elements central to farming and out of balance with the planet's biological boundaries. (2010-09-29)

New model could help predict major earthquakes
Nagoya University-led researchers characterized several earthquakes that struck South America's west coast over the last 100 years by using seismographic data, tsunami recordings, and models of the rapid plate movements associated with these natural disasters. The team showed that some earthquakes were linked to the same sites of rupture at plate boundaries and others to different sites. Thus, they revealed the periodicity and intensity of earthquakes associated with particular sites, potentially aiding future earthquake prediction. (2017-04-26)

Are we being watched? Tens of other worlds could spot the Earth
A group of scientists from Queen's University Belfast and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Germany have turned exoplanet-hunting on its head, in a study that instead looks at how an alien observer might be able to detect Earth using our own methods. They find that at least nine exoplanets are ideally placed to observe transits of Earth, in a new work published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. (2017-09-08)

Cold region 'tipping point' now inevitable
The decline of cold regions called periglacial zones is now inevitable due to climate change, researchers say. (2017-09-11)

Making the Hubble's deepest images even deeper
It has taken researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias almost three years to produce the deepest image of the Universe ever taken from space, by recovering a large quantity of 'lost' light around the largest galaxies in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field. (2019-01-24)

Off track: How storms will veer in a warmer world
The dry, semi-arid regions are expanding into higher latitudes, and temperate, rainy regions are migrating poleward. In a paper that that was recently published in Nature Geoscience, Weizmann Institute of Science researchers provide new insight into this phenomenon by discovering that mid-latitude storms are steered further toward the poles in a warmer climate. (2017-11-15)

Subduction of the Pacific plate resulted in the destruction of the North China Craton
Why the North China Craton became active 1-2 million years ago after 2 billion years of quiescence? The newest research suggested that its small size and the intra-plate weak zones make it vulnerable to destruction (internal reason). The subductions of the surrounding plates, also contribute to its destabilization (external factor). (2018-03-28)

The global footprint of fisheries
UCSB researchers collaborate to track commercial fishing worldwide in real time. (2018-02-22)

MIT study helps driverless cars change lanes more like humans do
At the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) will present a new lane-change algorithm that splits the difference. It allows for more aggressive lane changes than the simple models do but relies only on immediate information about other vehicles' directions and velocities to make decisions. (2018-05-22)

Palm trees are spreading northward. How far will they go?
What does it take for palm trees, the unofficial trademark of tropical landscapes, to expand into northern parts of the world that have long been too cold for palm trees to survive? A new study, led by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researcher Tammo Reichgelt, attempts to answer this question. He and his colleagues analyzed a broad dataset to determine global palm tree distribution in relation to temperature. (2018-03-19)

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinction
A research team, led by scientists from Arizona State University and funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation, is helping to understand why the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event happened and why it took life so long to recover. (2018-04-17)

Aquaplaning in the geological underground
Scientists propose a mechanism that explains how the biggest earthquake ever happened and how more than 50 years later another large earthquake in the same region released some of the stress that had built up in the depth. Water pressure in the underground plays a crucial role in both cases. (2018-04-02)

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