Popular Sudden Cardiac Death News and Current Events

Popular Sudden Cardiac Death News and Current Events, Sudden Cardiac Death News Articles.
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Wearable defibrillators may be an alternative to surgically implanted device for children with certain heart rhythm disorders
Study finds external wearable defibrillators are safe and effective in children with ventricular heart rhythm disorders that put them at risk for sudden cardiac death. The wearable devices may provide a reliable alternative to surgically implanted defibrillators in patients who cannot have surgically placed devices or who do not need them long term. (2018-06-26)

Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your health
Scientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study with 100 test subjects shows that taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes reduces blood pressure and increases vascular compliance, while also increasing heart rate similarly to medium-intensity exercise. (2018-01-05)

New health calculator can help predict heart disease risk, estimate heart age
A new online health calculator can help people determine their risk of heart disease, as well as their heart age, accounting for sociodemographic factors such as ethnicity, sense of belonging and education, as well as health status and lifestyle behaviors. The process to build and validate the tool is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-07-23)

A 'virtual heart' to simulate arrhythmia
A group of researchers from MIPT and Ghent University have proposed a mathematical model which is able to determine the factors responsible for the formation of different fibrosis patterns, which are believed to cause arrhythmia. To reproduce the formation of cardiac tissue, the researchers took a mathematical model -- one that is widely applied to study tissue growth -- and optimized it using the previously collected experimental data. (2017-09-06)

Technology-based process boosts cardiac rehab referral rates
Simply changing cardiac referral processes to opt-out rather than opt-in significantly increased referral rates, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's NCDR Annual Conference (NCDR.18) in Orlando. The technology-based program also provides resources to staff and patients about the significance and impact of cardiac rehab. (2018-03-07)

Molecular body guards for neurons
In the brain, patterns of neural activity are perfectly balanced. The interplay between activating and inhibitory neurotransmitters ensures that the level of activity stays within the physiological range. During an epileptic attack excitation gains the upper hand resulting in the death of neurons. Researchers of the Bonn University Medical School have now discovered a key player in a signal transduction cascade, which protects neurons from hyperexcitation-induced cell death. (2016-03-02)

Breast cancer statistics, 2017
Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states. (2017-10-03)

People with epilepsy: Tell us about rare risk of death
People with epilepsy want their health care providers to tell them about a rare risk of death associated with the disorder, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-23)

Heart failure after first heart attack may increase cancer risk
People who develop heart failure after their first heart attack have a greater risk of developing cancer when compared to first-time heart attack survivors without heart failure, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2016-07-11)

Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. (2017-01-25)

New screening tool can improve the quality of life for epilepsy patients with sleep apnea
Rutgers researchers have developed a tool to help neurologists screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures can be magnified by sleep disorders. (2018-09-27)

Scientists take aging cardiac stem cells out of semiretirement to improve stem cell therapy
With age, the chromosomes of our cardiac stem cells compress as they move into a state of safe, semiretirement. (2016-10-03)

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery. (2017-11-16)

Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack. (2019-04-17)

Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2017-04-03)

Now we know why babies shouldn't sleep face down
A developmental abnormality in babies -- especially in premature babies and in boys -- has for the first time been directly linked to cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). (2017-10-25)

Latinos less aware of automated external defibrillators
Latinos are less likely to know what an automated external defibrillator (AED) is and who can use it, which could affect outcomes of sudden cardiac arrests in Latino neighborhoods, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-11)

Online message board advice on ICDs reflects inaccuracies
Medical advice about implanted cardiac defibrillators obtained over two years from a dedicated online message board was accurate only about half of the time. About a quarter of advice dispensed via the online message board was inappropriate and 6 percent controversial. These findings underscore the need for clinicians to ask patients about sources of information to ensure they receive appropriate advice. (2018-04-07)

Immune cells halt fungal infection by triggering spore suicide
To protect the body from infection, immune cells in the lungs can exploit cell death programs in inhaled fungal pathogens, scientists have revealed, helping explain why most people aren't harmed by breathing in mold spores, and potentially offering new therapeutic strategies for people who do get infected. (2017-09-07)

When a child's heart stops, onset time of abnormal rhythms is crucial
Ventricular fibrillation, the life-threatening disordered heart rhythms that may accompany full cardiac arrest, occurs more frequently in children than commonly believed, according to a large national pediatric study. Furthermore, not all ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the same. VF is more often fatal if it is not the initial heart rhythm detected at the start of cardiac arrest, but instead develops later during the arrest, typically during resuscitation. (2006-05-31)

Impact of misunderstanding genetic tests for heart conditions
Patients who undergo genetic testing for inherited heart disease need to be better informed to know how to interpret the results and understand the impact the results will have on their life, a University of Sydney study has found. (2018-02-23)

Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the young
Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-02-12)

Passenger pigeon case study: How even large, stable populations may be at risk for extinction
A new study on passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) genomics suggests that even species with large and stable populations can be at risk of extinction if there's a sudden environmental change. (2017-11-16)

Gene expression patterns may help determine time of death
International team of scientists led by Roderic Guigó at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona shows that changes in gene expression in different tissues can be used to predict the time of death of individuals. Their results, which are published in Nature Communications this week, may have implications for forensic analyses. (2018-02-13)

Is endurance training bad for you?
In 2012, Belgium scientists published a study that concluded that repeated bouts of intensive endurance exercise at the elite level may result in the pathological enlargement of the right ventricle, which, according to the article, is associated with potential health hazards including sudden cardiac death. Sports medicine physicians have now tested these conclusions. The team could find no evidence that years of elite-level endurance training causes any long-term damage to the right ventricle. (2016-05-31)

Sleepy drivers are eight times more likely to crash
Driving while feeling sleepy, driving after five hours or less of sleep, and driving between 2am and 5am are all associated with a substantial increase in the risk of a car crash resulting in serious injury or death, finds a study in this week's BMJ. (2002-05-09)

Maternal chronic disease linked to higher rates of congenital heart disease in babies
Pregnant women with congenital heart defects or type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of giving birth to babies with severe congenital heart disease and should be monitored closely in the prenatal period, according to a study published in CMAJ. (2016-10-11)

Virtual coaches, fitness trackers help patients stay fit after cardiac rehab
A 12-week mobile health, or mHealth, program not only kept cardiac rehab patients from losing ground, it appeared to help them maintain and even gain fitness. (2018-03-15)

Northeastern researchers identify 36 new genes implicated in cardiac disease
A Northeastern University professor has developed a new personalized method to discover genes implicated in complex diseases. One of the ultimate goals of the research is to create personalized therapeutic drugs to reverse heart disease. (2018-03-07)

Exploring environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales
The trajectory and dynamics of ancient social evolution in human history is a widely concerned issue. Based on the comprehensive analysis of case studies on the rise and fall of ancient civilizations in relation to climate change and technological innovations, researchers in Lanzhou discuss environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales, as well as possible mechanism behind it. This research has been published in the updating special topic entitled (2017-12-29)

Older adults with heart disease can become more independent and heart healthy with physical activity
Improving physical function among older adults with heart disease helps heart health and even the oldest have a better quality of life and greater independence. Healthcare providers should emphasize cardiac rehabilitation when appropriate and provide individualized guidance on increasing daily physical activities for older patients with heart disease. (2017-03-23)

Declines in lung cancer death rates among US women have lagged in 2 hot spots
While lung cancer death rates among women in most of the United States have declined substantially in recent years, progress among women in a region covering central Appalachia and southern parts of the Midwest and in northern parts of the Midwest has lagged. (2018-03-30)

Cardiovascular disease in adult survivors of childhood cancer
For adult survivors of childhood cancer, cardiovascular disease presents at an earlier age, is associated with substantial morbidity, and is often asymptomatic. According to researchers, the type and frequency of screening that should be used in this group is not clear. (2016-01-04)

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (2021-01-08)

Hand grip strength may be associated with cardiac function and structure
Better hand grip strength may be associated with cardiac functions and structures that help reduce the risk of cardiovascular incidents, according to a study published March 14, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sebastian Beyer and Steffen Petersen from the Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac death
A new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death. The model, developed by Mark Walker and colleagues from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and IBM Research, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., is presented in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-11-16)

Re-interventions are common in long-term survivors of childhood heart operation
Among patients who undergo childhood heart surgery for the severe birth defect single-ventricle disease, two-thirds of survivors require a surgical or catheter-based procedure within 20 years. Pediatric cardiology researchers note that doctors should counsel families about the likelihood of re-interventions. (2017-09-18)

Therapy for muscular dystrophy-caused heart failure also improves muscle function in mice
Injections of cardiac progenitor cells help reverse the fatal heart disease caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy and also lead to improved limb strength and movement ability, a new study shows. The study, published today in Stem Cell Reports, showed that when researchers injected cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) into the hearts of laboratory mice with muscular dystrophy, heart function improved along with a marked increase in exercise capacity. (2018-02-22)

Anabolic steroids linked to higher rates of premature death in men
Men who use androgenic anabolic steroids -- such as testosterone -- may face a higher risk of early death and of experiencing more hospital admissions, according to a new Journal of Internal Medicine study. (2018-11-21)

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