Popular Sulfur News and Current Events

Popular Sulfur News and Current Events, Sulfur News Articles.
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Gold recycling
'Urban mining', the recycling of precious metals from electronic gadgets, becomes ever more important, although processes that are both efficient and environmentally benign are still scarce. An international team of scientists has now looked deeper into gold dissolution, in particular, how organic thiol-containing compounds help dissolve elemental gold. Their study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie proposes selective, fast, and convenient thiol-assisted gold leaching processes. (2018-12-13)

Electrons use DNA like a wire for signaling DNA replication
A Caltech-led study has shown that the electrical wire-like behavior of DNA is involved in the molecule's replication. (2017-02-23)

Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Rutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study. (2017-10-09)

Study: Reducing greenhouse gas in rocky mountain region has health, financial benefits
Research by Drexel University and the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests that imposing fees on energy producers that emit greenhouse gas could improve the health and financial well-being of the Rocky Mountain region. (2019-07-25)

New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. Researchers from the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have recently revealed new properties of one of its key elements: sulfur. (2018-12-14)

Death by volcano?
he discovery of anomalously high levels of mercury in rocks from the Ordivician geological period has led to a new interpretation of the ensuing mass extinction. A sequence of disturbances may have led to catastrophic cooling by reflective sulfate aerosols injected into the atmosphere by massive volcanism. The finding is important since aerosol cooling is under consideration as a way to temper global warming. (2017-05-29)

Large volcanic eruptions in Tropics can trigger El Niño events
Explosive volcanic eruptions in the tropics can lead to El Niño events, those notorious warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to a new study. (2017-10-03)

Thanks to pig remains, scientists uncover extensive human mobility to sites near Stonehenge
A mutli-isotope analysis of pigs remains found around henge complexes near Stonehenge has revealed the large extent and scale of movements of human communities in Britain during the Late Neolithic. The findings 'demonstrate a level of interaction and social complexity not previously appreciated,' the authors say, and provide insight into more than a century (2019-03-13)

Long-term monitoring is essential to effective environmental policy
Environmental policy guided by science saves lives, money, and ecosystems. So reports a team of eleven senior researchers in Environmental Science and Policy. Using air pollution in the United States as a case study, they highlight the success of cleanup strategies backed by long-term environmental monitoring. (2018-03-16)

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites
A new study found a dramatic increase in the chemical weathering rates of mined landscapes, which are melting away bedrock up to 45 times faster than unmined areas. The weathering has global consequences for the cycling of sulfur, a key nutrient for all life forms. (2018-09-25)

How mitochondria cope with too much work
Researchers have uncovered a mechanism by which mitochondria, essential organelles within cells that create energy, cope with an overload of imported proteins. (2018-04-12)

New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil
A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a metabolic shock to cells, new research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison finds. (2019-03-25)

In-depth mineral review provides foundational resource for dairy scientists
Life is dependent on minerals. Accordingly, the diets of animals must contain certain minerals in both large amounts, via marcrominerals, and small amounts, via microminerals. In a thorough and wide-ranging review published in the Journal of Dairy Science®, Jesse Goff, DVM, PhD, professor and Anderson Chair in Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University, examined necessary minerals as well as the mechanisms for their absorption in cows, providing insight into these vital elements. (2018-03-01)

Acid rain has a disproportionate impact on coastal waters
The release of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere by power plants and agricultural activities plays a minor role in making the ocean more acidic on a global scale, but the impact is greatly amplified in the shallower waters of the coastal ocean, according to new research by atmospheric and marine chemists. (2007-09-07)

'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollution
A study by Indiana University researchers shows that excess emissions -- which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters -- can make serious contributions to overall air pollution. (2018-02-14)

Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stopped
Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention. (2018-01-22)

Looking for the next leap in rechargeable batteries
USC researchers may have just found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks to the next wave of rechargeable batteries -- small enough for cellphones and powerful enough for cars. (2017-02-17)

Oldest evaporite deposit to date provides unique look into early Earth's atmosphere
An analysis of salt mineral sediments, or evaporites, from the oldest deposit of this type discovered to date provides a unique window on the atmospheric conditions of early Earth following the Great Oxidation Event 2.3 billion years ago. (2018-03-22)

A new approach to improving lithium-sulfur batteries
Researchers from the University of Delaware and China's Northwestern Polytechnical University, Shenzhen University and Hong Kong Polytechnic University have demonstrated a new polysulfide entrapping strategy that greatly improves the cycle stability of Li-S batteries. The work was published recently in the journal Advanced Materials. (2017-03-06)

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteries
They die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have developed a high-powered, environmentally safe lithium-sulfur substitute that could drastically lengthen battery life. Their work has been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2018-03-27)

Cheaper, less toxic and recyclable light absorbers for hydrogen production
Achieving artificial photosynthesis in solution remains limited by the use of costly and toxic metal-based compounds to harvest light. Researchers at CNRS, CEA and the Université Grenoble Alpes propose an efficient alternative using semiconductor nanocrystals (also called quantum dots) based on cheaper and less toxic elements, such as copper, indium and sulfur. (2018-04-10)

Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon capture
Hybrid materials known as mixed matrix membranes are considered a promising approach to capture carbon dioxide and mitigate against global warming. These materials are derived from a polymer combined with porous nanoparticles. We show that materials prepared using porous organic polymers are resilient to the acidic impurities present in industrial gas streams, whereas other hybrid materials fail. This means that they can be effective in carbon capture applications where these impurities are present. (2017-11-17)

Shutdown of coal-fired power plant results in significant fetal health improvement in downwind areas
First study to show fetal health improvement as a result of a coal-fired power plant shutdown due to direct federal level regulation on single pollution source finds 15 percent reduction in likelihood of having a low birth weight baby and 28 percent reduction in likelihood of a preterm birth in areas downwind of the power plant. (2017-12-21)

Climate geoengineering research should include developing countries
An appeal on projects that could mask global warming is published in Nature by scientists from 12 countries, including Brazilian Paulo Artaxo. (2018-05-09)

Japanese researchers discover a novel layered superconductor based on tin and arsenic
Tokyo, Japan - Researchers from the Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University have recently discovered a novel layered superconductor (NaSn2As2) containing tin (Sn) and arsenic (As) as its major components. (2017-11-08)

Blue holes bring forgotten chemical element back on stage
About a third of all Swiss exports result from fundamental discoveries in synthetic chemistry. Certain drugs and perfumes, as well as food and agricultural products -- and even Ferrari's famous red color -- are derived from new molecular structures invented by Swiss scientists. Chemists at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, have just discovered that chemical bonds based on antimony yield powerful new catalysts that can be used to accurately stimulate the transformation of a molecule from within. (2018-03-21)

Hubble solves cosmic 'whodunit' with interstellar forensics
On the outskirts of our galaxy, a cosmic tug-of-war is unfolding-and only NASA's Hubble Space Telescope can see who's winning. (2018-03-22)

Study measures air pollution increase attributable to air conditioning
A new University of Wisconsin-Madison study shows that the electricity production associated with air conditioning causes emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and carbon dioxide to increase by hundreds to thousands of metric tons, or 3 to 4 percent per degree Celsius (or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit). (2017-05-03)

Scientists discover key gene for producing marine molecule with huge environmental impacts
Researchers have discovered a key gene for the synthesis of one of the world's most abundant sulfur molecules -- Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). DMSP is an important nutrient in marine environments with more than one billion tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton, seaweed and bacteria. The discovery represents a huge step forward in the field of sulfur cycling in marine environments. It could also allow scientists to better predict the impact of climate change on DMSP production. (2018-02-26)

Dinosaur-killing asteroid impact cooled Earth's climate more than previously thought
The Chicxulub asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs likely released far more climate-altering sulfur gas into the atmosphere than originally thought, according to new research. (2017-10-31)

WSU researchers document one of planet's largest volcanic eruptions
Washington State University researchers have determined that the Pacific Northwest was home to one of the Earth's largest known volcanic eruptions, a millennia-long spewing of sulfuric gas that blocked out the sun and cooled the planet. Only two other eruptions -- the basalt floods of the Siberian Traps and the Deccan Traps -- were larger, and they led to two of the Earth's great extinctions. (2017-10-11)

New nanowires are just a few atoms thick
Subnanometer-scale channels in 2-D materials could point toward future electronics, solar cells. (2017-12-04)

Strong link between air pollution in Southwestern Ontario and adverse birth outcomes
A study by researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and Brescia University College has found evidence of a strong association between exposure to sulfur dioxide during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes. (2019-04-03)

Atmospheric aerosol formation from biogenic vapors is strongly affected by air pollutants
According to a recent study published in the journal Science Advances, air pollution not only affects air quality, but it also changes the pathways along which new particles are formed in the atmosphere. (2018-12-14)

Microbes living in a toxic volcanic lake could hold clues to life on Mars
Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered microbes living in one of the harshest environments on Earth. Their findings could guide scientists looking for signs of ancient life on Mars. (2018-05-02)

New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials
Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium. The conducting layer features four distinct sublayers; by introducing more elements, they were able to achieve unparalleled customizability and a higher ''critical temperature'' below which superconductivity is observed, a key objective of superconductor research. Their design strategy may be applied to engineer new and improved superconducting materials. (2019-10-12)

The complicated biology of garlic
Researchers generally agree that garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, in a review published April 26 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers in the UK argue that explaining how garlic affects human health--and getting consistent results during clinical trials--is more complex, because of the vast array of compounds garlic produces. (2018-04-26)

Digging deeper into Mars
Scientists continue to unravel the mystery of life on Mars by investigating evidence of water in the planet's soil. Previous observations of soil observed along crater slopes on Mars showed a significant amount of perchlorate salts, which tend to be associated with brines with a moderate pH level. However, researchers have stepped back to look at the bigger picture through data collected from the 2001: Mars Odyssey, and found a different chemical on Mars may be key. (2016-07-25)

What's behind smelly wine
Aging often improves the flavor of wine, but sometimes the beverage emerges from storage with an unpleasant smell. One of the prime culprits is hydrogen sulfide, which can give the affected wine an aroma of sewage or rotten eggs. In a report in ACS' >Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers have now identified some potential sources of this stinky compound. (2018-12-12)

Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymes
Penicillin-based antibiotics contain a five-membered hydrocarbon cycle, additionally incorporating a sulfur and a nitrogen atom. Nadine Zumbrägel, doctoral student at the Chair of Organic Chemistry I at Bielefeld University, has succeeded in selectively synthesizing this important substructure with different residues on this cycle using a biotechnological method. (2018-05-16)

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