Popular Sunflower News and Current Events

Popular Sunflower News and Current Events, Sunflower News Articles.
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NTU scientists discover sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops
NTU Singapore scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15% in laboratory conditions. (2019-04-20)

Sunflower pollen protects bees from parasites
Solitary mason bees specializing on sunflower pollen were not attacked by a common brood-parasitic wasp, which lays eggs in the nests, where its larvae kill bee eggs and eat their pollen provisions. (2016-06-14)

A starfish cold case reopens, climate change remains suspect
As ocean temperatures rise and oceanic diseases proliferate, species like sea stars struggle to survive, and scientists are looking for underlying causes. To bring clarity to the sea star disease problem, the scientists propose a new, broad nomenclature in a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. (2018-03-13)

Diverse natural fatty acids follow 'Golden Mean'
Bioinformatics scientists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have discovered that the number of theoretically possible fatty acids with the same chain length but different structures can be determined with the aid of the famous Fibonacci sequence. As they explain in Scientific Reports, the number of possible fatty acids with increasing chain length rises at each step by a factor of approximately 1.618, and therefore agrees with what is called the 'Golden Mean.' (2017-01-27)

Natural enemies reduce pesticide use
Crop variety in agriculture has a positive impact on the natural enemies of aphids. Farmers can use this insight to keep aphids at bay and cut down on pesticides. (2018-03-20)

Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol
Using a statistical technique called network meta-analysis, researchers have combined the results of dozens of studies of dietary oils to identify those with the best effect on patients' LDL cholesterol and other blood lipids. (2018-10-09)

Genetics help make a weed a weed
New University of British Columbia research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes. (2018-05-07)

Researchers find low magnesium levels make vitamin D ineffective
Vitamin D can't be metabolized without sufficient magnesium levels, meaning Vitamin D remains stored and inactive for as many as 50 percent of Americans. In addition, Vitamin D supplements can increase a person's calcium and phosphate levels even while they remain Vitamin D deficient. People may suffer from vascular calcification if their magnesium levels aren't high enough to prevent the complication. (2018-02-26)

Organic farming enhances honeybee colony performance
A team of researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the University of La Rochelle is now the first to have demonstrated that organic farming benefits honeybee colonies, especially when food is scarce in late spring. The scientists analyzed six years of data collected through a unique system for monitoring domesticated bees that is unparalleled in Europe. Their findings are published in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2019-06-26)

Turning chicken poop and weeds into biofuel
Chicken is a favorite, inexpensive meat across the globe. But the bird's popularity results in a lot of waste that can pollute soil and water. One strategy for dealing with poultry poop is to turn it into biofuel, and now scientists have developed a way to do this by mixing the waste with another environmental scourge, an invasive weed that is affecting agriculture in Africa. They report their approach in ACS' journal Energy & Fuels. (2017-05-03)

Current mass extinction spurs major study of which plants to save
The Earth is in the midst of the sixth mass extinction of both plants and animals, with nearly 50 percent of all species disappearing, scientists say. (2008-10-20)

Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice
Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci. These data support further investigation of diets rich in healthy fats as a potential treatment for the nerve damage that occurs with diabetes, known as diabetic neuropathy. (2019-03-18)

Sunflower pollen has medicinal, protective effects on bees
Bees fed a diet of sunflower pollen show dramatically lower rates of infection by two separate pathogens, suggesting medicinal and protective effects for pollinators in peril. (2018-09-26)

How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity
The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect. Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music 'significantly impaired' people's ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity -- but there was no effect for background library noise. (2019-02-27)

Omega-3 fatty acids shown to exert a positive effect on the aging brain
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to show that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improves memory function in humans. They studied the effects of supplementation with natural omega-3 fatty acids in healthy older adults over a period of six months. Results from the study, which show that supplementation leads to significant improvements in memory function, have been published in the current issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2016-03-15)

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impact
New research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists at the University of Lincoln, UK, investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between the body condition and the source of the bird's diet. (2018-06-21)

How females store sperm
The science of breeding chickens has revealed part of the mystery of how certain female animals are able to store sperm long-term. Droplets of fat transferred from female cells to sperm cells may contribute to keeping sperm alive. A scientific understanding of how sperm can be kept viable longer could benefit any fertility-related work. (2016-06-13)

RNA changes aided sunflower's rapid evolutionary transformation, domestication
A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study sheds light on the genetic mechanisms that allowed sunflowers to undergo a relatively rapid evolutionary transition from wild to domesticated in just over 5,000 years. (2018-06-11)

Climate change, urbanization driving opossum's northward march
The headline reads like something from the satirical newspaper The Onion: 'Grand Forks opossum slain; body to go to University of Michigan for research.' (2018-02-08)

Cleaning out pollen shells (video)
As allergy season intensifies, many people are cursing pollen -- the powdery substance released by plants for reproduction. However, pollen may serve a purpose beyond making new plants and triggering sneezes. In ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers report a new method for cleaning out the insides of pollen grains so that the non-allergenic shells can be used to carry medicines or vaccines into the human body. (2018-07-11)

The FASEB Journal: Fish oil supplementation can slow muscle loss during immobilization
A study published in The FASEB Journal demonstrated that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids (or fish oils) reduced the rate at which young women lost muscle mass during a period of immobilization. (2019-01-10)

Health risks through fumigated containers
Products transported by sea in containers are often fumigated with biocides as protection against pests. In addition to this, they often contain volatile organic solvents, such as the potentially carcinogenic 1,2-dichloroethane, which can originate from cleaning or manufacturing processes. In a meeting held at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) on 16 November 2018, 36 experts from science, monitoring authorities, trade and industry discussed the effects of substances of this kind on health, along with the need for future action. (2019-01-16)

Key sea star predator wiped out by disease and abnormally warm waters
From California to British Columbia, the abundance of sunflower starfish -- an important predator in the Northeast Pacific -- declined dramatically in both nearshore and deep waters from 2013 to 2015, according to a new study that leveraged citizen science diving surveys. This significant decline was due to the sea star wasting disease that ravaged the waters of the Northeast Pacific during this time. (2019-01-30)

Conservation agriculture increases carbon sequestration in extensive crops
A study performed by UCO (University of Cordoba) and IFAPA (Institute of Agricultural Research and Training) analyzed the potential of no-till farming in order to achieve the aims of the 4perMille initiative, that seeks to increase the amount of organic carbon in soil. (2020-07-07)

'Sun in a box' would store renewable energy for the grid
MIT engineers have come up with a conceptual design for a system to store renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, and deliver that energy back into an electric grid on demand. The system may be designed to power a small city not just when the sun is up or the wind is high, but around the clock. (2018-12-05)

Honey bee colonies down by 16%
The number of honey bee colonies fell by 16% in the winter of 2017-18, according to an international study led by the University of Strathclyde. (2019-06-05)

Environment, not evolution, might underlie some human-ape differences
Apes' abilities have been unfairly measured, throwing into doubt the assumed belief that human infants are superior to adult chimpanzees, according to a new study by leaders in the field of ape cognition. (2019-07-15)

Replacing soybean meal in pig diets
Canola, cottonseed, and sunflower products can replace soybean meal in diets fed to pigs, but they contain less protein and energy. To determine if it makes economic sense to use them, producers need to know the concentrations and digestibility of the nutrients they contain. To help them make the decision, University of Illinois researchers examined amino acid digestibility for these products. (2013-02-28)

Taking the lead toward witchweed control
A compound that binds to and inhibits a crucial receptor protein offers a new route for controlling a parasitic plant. (2018-07-19)

Newly published model of FSHD and a potential gene therapy to improve functional outcomes
Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the most prevalent dominantly inherited muscular dystrophy in the world. To date, there are no pharmacologic treatments available for the more than 850,000 people affected worldwide. Developing models to use for testing potential therapeutics has been a challenge for the research community. (2018-11-16)

Controlling temperatures for inexpensive plant experiments
Inexpensive, easy-to-use temperature controllers are able to provide reliable set temperatures for the detailed observation of developmental rates in response to different temperature treatments. (2019-06-14)

Stressed crops emit more methane than thought
Scientists at the University of Calgary have found that methane emission by plants could be a bigger problem in global warming than previously thought. Research published in the advanced online journal Physiologia Plantarum (2009-08-17)

Once-abundant sea stars imperiled by disease along West Coast
Ocean warming and an infectious wasting disease has devastated populations of large sunflower sea stars once abundant along the West Coast of North America in just a few years, according to research co-led by the University of California, Davis, and Cornell University. (2019-01-30)

Omega-6 fats may help prevent type 2 diabetes
The risk of developing type 2 diabetes could be significantly reduced by eating a diet rich in omega-6 polyunsaturated fats, a new study suggests. These findings, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, shed new light on the potential health benefits of omega-6, which is found in bean and seed oils such as soybean and sunflower oils and in nuts, and support clinical recommendations to increase dietary intake of omega-6 rich foods. (2017-10-11)

Easy to overdose on paracetamol if you're selenium deficient, says research
A lack of the mineral selenium in the diet puts people at risk of paracetamol overdose, even when the painkiller is taken at levels claimed to be safe on the packaging, according to collaborative research emerging from the University of Bath and Southwest University in China. (2020-08-04)

RUDN chemists have completely changed the direction of Diels-Alder reaction
RUDN-based researchers together with Russian colleagues studied the Diels-Alder reaction in the derivatives of furan (a heterocyclic organic substance) and managed to reach 100 percent control over the composition of its products. The described patterns may be useful for creating new methods of agricultural waste processing. Moreover, the reaction may be used for the manufacture of graphene fragments and a number of biologically active substances. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry. (2018-06-27)

Predators to spare
In 2014, a disease of epidemic proportions gripped the West Coast of the US. You may not have noticed, though, unless you were underwater. (2020-02-12)

Sea star wasting disease had severe impact on sunflower sea stars in the Salish Sea
Sea star wasting disease caused a severe decline in sunflower sea star populations in the Salish Sea off the coast of British Columbia and northern Washington state, according to a study published Oct. 26, 2016, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Diego Montecino-Latorre from the University of California Davis, USA and colleagues. (2016-10-26)

Effects of linoleic acid on inflammatory response depend on genes
The effects of linoleic acid on the human body are largely dependent on genes, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid. People carrying different variants of the FADS1 gene had a different inflammatory response and different changes in their fasting glucose levels when supplementing their diet by linoleic acid rich sunflower oil. This was the first time these associations were studied in humans. (2019-01-15)

Population boom preceded early farming
University of Utah anthropologists counted the number of carbon-dated artifacts at archaeological sites and concluded that a population boom and scarce food explain why people in eastern North America domesticated plants for the first time on the continent about 5,000 years ago. (2016-08-02)

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