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Popular Sunflower News and Current Events, Sunflower News Articles.
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Fatty acid may help combat multiple sclerosis
The abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system can be triggered by the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue, according to a new Yale study. The finding suggests that dietary change might help treat some people with the autoimmune disease. (2021-01-19)

Findings suggest link between vitamin E and subsequent decline in physical function for older adults
Low serum concentration of vitamin E, an indication of poor nutrition, is associated with physical decline for older persons, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of JAMA. (2008-01-22)

New plant named to honor the peace-making efforts of the Colombian President
Named to honor the peace-making efforts of Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, a new species of the sunflower family genus Espeletia is described from the Páramo de Presidente. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys. (2017-01-06)

Traces of early Native Americans -- in sunflower genes
New information about early Native Americans' horticultural practices comes not from hieroglyphs or other artifacts, but from a suite of four gene duplicates found in wild and domesticated sunflowers. Indiana University Bloomington scientists learned duplications of the gene flowering locus T, or FT, could have evolved and interacted to prolong a flower's time to grow. A longer flower growth period means a bigger sunflower -- presumably an attribute of value to the plant's first breeders. (2010-04-02)

Biodiesel from sewage sludge within pennies a gallon of being competitive
Existing technology can produce biodiesel fuel from municipal sewage sludge that is within a few cents a gallon of being competitive with conventional diesel refined from petroleum, according to an article in ACS' Energy & Fuels, a bimonthly journal. Sludge is the solid material left behind from the treatment of sewage at waste-water treatment plants. (2010-05-20)

Burly bird gets the worm
The pecking order of garden birds is determined by their size and weight, new research shows. (2018-09-05)

The anatomy of petal drop in sunflowers
Anatomical analysis of two sunflower cultivars revealed a differentiated region at the junction of the flowers' petal and achene. Cell division at the abscission zone of the short-lived cultivar occurred earlier than in the long-lived cultivar, indicating that the tempo of development differed; the abscission layer reached full maturity sooner in Procut Bicolor, resulting in earlier petal drop, than in Procut Yellow Lite. Vase life was also correlated to flower color. (2015-01-14)

Sea stars critical to kelp forest resilience
A study by Simon Fraser University resource and environmental management researcher Jenn Burt reveals that sunflower sea stars play a critical role in the resilience of B.C.'s kelp forests, which are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Similar to land-based forests, kelp forests provide essential habitat for species and also help remove CO2 from the atmosphere. (2018-08-10)

Study suggests genetically modifying sunflowers for white mold resistance
A field study conducted by plant scientists at Vanderbilt University and Indiana University found that a transgene that can provide commercial sunflowers with additional protection against a disease called white mold is unlikely to spread throughout the wild sunflower population: Wild sunflowers already possess a degree of resistance to white mold and, as a result, those that pick up the transgene do not appear to gain a reproductive advantage that would cause them to spread widely. (2003-05-22)

AIDS drug from sunflowers
Sunflowers can produce a substance which prevents the AIDS pathogen HIV from reproducing, at least in cell cultures. This is the result of research carried out by scientists at the University of Bonn in cooperation with the Caesar Research Center. (2006-01-09)

Sunflower genome sequence to provide roadmap for more resilient crops
University of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence. This new resource will assist future research programs using genetic tools to improve crop resilience and oil production. (2017-05-22)

Higher folates, not antioxidants, can reduce hearing loss risk in men
Increased intakes of antioxidant vitamins have no bearing on whether or not a man will develop hearing loss, but higher folate intake can decrease his risk by 20 percent, according to new research presented at the 2009 American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery Foundation Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, in San Diego, Calif. (2009-10-05)

MIT research: A new sunflower-inspired pattern increases concentrated solar efficiency
A new sunflower-inspired pattern increases concentrated solar efficiency. (2012-01-11)

Physicians analyze food trends and publish dietary prescription for optimal heart health
Nutrition researcher Neal Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., president and founder of the nonprofit Physicians Committee, and 11 other authors, including Andrew Freeman, M.D., Pamela Morris, M.D., Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., Dean Ornish, M.D., and Kim Williams, M.D., reviewed the latest research behind popular food trends for 'Trending Cardiovascular Nutrition Controversies,' which appears in the March 7, 2017 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2017-03-03)

Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower
In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. What is fascinating about the process is that one step in the fibers' formation is similar to the growth of sunflower petals. (2019-05-13)

Mineral oil contamination in humans: A health problem?
From a quantitative standpoint, mineral oil is probably the largest contaminant of our body. That this contaminant can be tolerated without health concerns in humans has not been proven convincingly. The current editorial of the European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology reflects on this and concludes that this proof either has to be provided or we have to take measures to reduce our exposure from all sources, including cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and the environmental contamination. (2008-11-24)

The best parents: Genetically as divergent as possible with similar preferences
The more diverse in genetics, than better. But only in cases of similar preferences. A team of researchers led by IPK Gatersleben has succeeded in providing answers to a long unsolved question in the breeding of plant hybrids. (2020-06-12)

Eating competence may lower risk of heart disease
People who are confident, comfortable and flexible with their eating habits may be at a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than people who are not. Researchers at Penn State suggest that a curriculum that helps people understand their eating habits could prove to be an important medical nutrition therapy. (2007-09-18)

Sheep thrive in GMO feeding trial
Increased wool growth and live weight gain in Merino sheep are the results of a recent Australian feeding trial using genetically modified lupins. The CSIRO trial explored nutritional benefits of lupin seeds genetically modified to incorporate a sunflower gene that stimulates the production of a highly nutritious protein. (2000-11-21)

Olive oil more stable and healthful than seed oils for frying food
Frying is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food -- think fried chicken and french fries. Even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food. (2014-10-22)

Toxic aldehydes detected in reheated oil
Researchers from the University of the Basque Country have been the first to discover the presence of certain aldehydes in food, which are believed to be related to some neurodegenerative diseases and some types of cancer. These toxic compounds can be found in some oils, such as sunflower oil, when heated at a suitable temperature for frying. (2012-02-22)

Environmental cost of formula milk should be a matter of global concern
'The production of unnecessary infant and toddler formulas exacerbates environmental damage and should be a matter of increasing global concern,' argue experts in The BMJ today. (2019-10-02)

Oregano oil may help sunflower seeds keep longer
A study in the Journal of Food Science published by the Institute of Food Technologists showed that the addition of oregano essential oils to sunflower seeds preserved their positive sensory attributes and freshness quality. (2013-12-16)

Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than others
House finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving problems than their rural counterparts. They are able to solve new problems even when humans are around, says Meghan Cook of Arizona State University in the US, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The study investigated how increased urbanization and human presence affects the behavior and foraging habits of wildlife, and how birds, in particular, cope. (2017-04-18)

New lettuce genome assembly offers clues to success of huge plant family
UC Davis researchers have unlocked a treasure-trove of genetic information about lettuce and related plants, completing the first reported comprehensive genome assembly for lettuce and the massive Compositae plant family. (2017-04-12)

Wildly stronger sunflowers
Annually, diseases, weeds, and insects are estimated to cause more than $1.3 billion in losses for sunflower growers. To combat this, researchers are preserving the genetic diversity of wild sunflowers. Wild plants retain the genes needed to resist pests and survive in different environments. (2017-03-15)

Survey shows impact of sea star wasting disease in Salish Sea
Sea star wasting disease has devastated intertidal populations of these animals on the West coast from Mexico to Alaska. But what about sea stars that live below the low tide line, mostly out of sight? An analysis of data collected by divers in the Salish Sea shows severe impacts on some species, especially the sunflower sea star, Pycnopodia helianthoides. (2016-10-26)

Pollinator extinctions alter structure of ecological networks
The absence of a single dominant bumblebee species from an ecosystem disrupts foraging patterns among a broad range of remaining pollinators in the system -- from other bees to butterflies, beetles and more, field experiments show. (2017-06-21)

Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips -- rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops -- offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection risk. (2020-05-14)

Mechanism outlined by which inadequate vitamin E can cause brain damage
Researchers have discovered how vitamin E deficiency may cause neurological damage by interrupting a supply line of specific nutrients and robbing the brain of the 'building blocks' it needs to maintain neuronal health. It found that nutrients needed to build and maintain the brain can be cut by more than half, with possible implications for an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. (2015-04-13)

Chew on this for opening day: Baseball's longtime link with tobacco
Opening Day is April 5, and later that same week, University of Cincinnati sports researcher Kevin Grace will look back at how baseball has changed. He explores the rise and fall of baseball's (2004-04-01)

The power of flowers: Research sprouts a closer look at sunflower genetics
A Kansas State University biology professor has two major research projects that involve evolutionary change in sunflowers, the state flower of Kansas. He studies naturally occurring species to try and understand the genetic basis of natural variation. (2012-01-19)

UCR researchers examine how some invasive plants gain a foothold
When it comes to controlling invasive weeds, sex might be a useful weapon, according to research from UC Riverside geneticist Norman Ellstrand in an article in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science. (2007-01-09)

Diet high in vitamin C decreases stroke risk, especially among smokers
Eating a diet high in vitamin C may decrease your risk of stroke, particularly if you smoke, according to a study published in the November 11 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2003-11-10)

Sequencing hundreds of nuclear genes in the sunflower family now possible
Researchers have developed an efficient approach for sequencing hundreds of nuclear genes across members of the Compositae (sunflower family) to better-resolve phylogenetic relationships within the family, as well as a bioinformatic workflow for processing and analyzing the resulting sequence data. This method, available in the February issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, can be applied to any taxonomic group of interest and could serve as a model for phylogenetic investigations of other major plant groups. (2014-02-20)

Pleasing plant shapes explained by new computer model
Botanists and computer scientists teamed up to produce the most detailed model yet of how plant growth occurs, beginning at the molecular level. (2006-01-23)

University of Cincinnati researchers seek improved targeting in Parkinson's surgery
A $51,000 grant will enable University of Cincinnati researchers to determine whether sophisticated new imaging technologies can help them achieve pinpoint placement of deep-brain stimulation electrodes in patients with Parkinson's disease. (2009-01-29)

Why food sticks to nonstick frying pans
Foods will sometimes get stuck to a heated surface, even if oil or a nonstick frying pan is used. Scientists have investigated the fluid properties of oil on a flat surface and their work shows convection may be to blame. When the pan is heated from below, a temperature gradient is established in the oil film, as well as a surface tension gradient. This gradient sets up a type of convection known as thermocapillary convection. (2021-02-02)

Corn could help farmers fight devastating weed
Researchers in China investigate corn's ability to act as a trap crop and control sunflower broomrape. (2013-01-07)

Preserving van Gogh's priceless masterpieces
The chrome yellow pigment that renowned post-Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh favored in priceless masterpieces like Sunflowers, the Yellow House and Wheatfield with Crows is especially sensitive to certain types of light and should be protected to prevent darkening. That's the conclusion of a series of studies in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, which could help preserve masterpieces by van Gogh and contemporaries like Gauguin, Cezanne and others. (2012-11-14)

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