Popular Supernovae News and Current Events

Popular Supernovae News and Current Events, Supernovae News Articles.
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An unusual white dwarf may be a supernova leftover
Astronomers have identified a white dwarf star in our galaxy that may be the leftover remains of a recently discovered type of supernova. (2017-08-17)

Explosive stars with good table manners
In two comprehensive studies of SN 2011fe -- the closest Type Ia supernova in the past two decades -- there is new evidence that indicates that the white dwarf progenitor was a particularly picky eater, leading scientists to conclude that the companion star was not likely to be a sun-like star or an evolved giant. (2012-03-20)

Scientists publish new findings about the 'supernova of a generation'
An international team of scientists, including astrophysicists from UC Santa Barbara, has discovered that a supernova that exploded in August -- dubbed the supernova of a generation -- was a (2011-12-14)

Astronomers discover a star that would not die
An international team of astronomers has made a bizarre discovery; a star that refuses to stop shining. (2017-11-08)

Weighing massive stars in nearby galaxy reveals excess of heavyweights
An international team of astronomers has revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighboring galaxy. The discovery, made in the gigantic star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in today. (2018-01-04)

Seeing quadruple: Four images of the same supernova, a rare find
Galaxies bend light through an effect called gravitational lensing that helps astronomers peer deeper into the cosmos. (2017-04-20)

Supernova observation first of its kind using NASA satellite
Their research, detailed in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, represents the first published findings about a supernova observed using TESS, and add new insights to long-held theories about the elements left behind after a white dwarf star explodes into a supernova. (2019-07-16)

The big star that couldn't become a supernova
For the first time in history, astronomers have been able to watch as a dying star was reborn as a black hole. It went out with a whimper instead of a bang. (2017-05-25)

Big stars are more abundant than thought
Observations of a nearby star-forming region reveal that large stars are more prevalent than models have predicted. (2018-01-04)

The vibrating universe: Making astronomy accessible to the deaf
Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, have teamed with teachers at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside, or CSDR, to design an astronomy workshop for students with hearing loss that can be easily used in classrooms, museums, fairs, and other public events. The workshop utilized a sound stage that allowed the CSDR students to 'feel' vibrations from rockets, stars, galaxies, supernovae, and even remnants of the Big Bang itself. (2019-02-05)

Explosive material: The making of a supernova
Pre-supernova stars may show signs of instability for months before the big explosion (2017-04-09)

Overabundance of massive stars in the Tarantula Nebula
An international team of astronomers with participation of researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL) has revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighbouring galaxy. The discovery, made in a gigantic star-forming region of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in today. (2018-01-31)

Nearby supernova ashes continue to rain on Earth
Traces of 60Fe detected in space indicate that a nearby supernova occurred within the last few million years. The iron isotope 60Fe, which is very rare, is created when a massive star collapses in the form of supernova. (2016-04-21)

Astrophysicists discovered a star polluted by calcium
An international team of astrophysicists led by a scientist from the Sternberg Astronomical Institute of the Lomonosov Moscow State University reported the discovery of a binary solar-type star inside the supernova remnant RCW 86. Spectroscopic observation of this star revealed that its atmosphere is polluted by heavy elements ejected during the supernova explosion that produced RCW 86. (2017-04-28)

Improved Hubble yardstick gives fresh evidence for new physics in the universe
Astronomers have used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to make the most precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe since it was first calculated nearly a century ago. Intriguingly, the results are forcing astronomers to consider that they may be seeing evidence of something unexpected at work in the universe. (2018-02-22)

A scientific first: A supernova explosion is observed in real time
As members of a team analyzing data from the first real-time observation of a supernova explosion, Weizmann Institute scientists are finding confirmation for their model of the process and helping to solve unanswered questions. (2008-05-21)

Dark energy existed in infant universe
Researchers have discovered that dark energy, a mysterious repulsive force that makes the universe expand at an ever-faster rate, is not new but rather has been present in the universe for most of its 13-billion-year history. (2006-11-16)

New evidence on the formation of the solar system
International research involving a Monash University scientist is using new computer models and evidence from meteorites to show that a low-mass supernova triggered the formation of our solar system. (2016-12-01)

Collapsing star gives birth to a black hole
Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. (2017-05-25)

Zwicky Transient Facility spots a bumper crop of supernovae, black holes and more
The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), an automated sky survey project based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory near San Diego, California, has produced its first bounty of new results. Since officially beginning operations in March 2018, the new instrument has discovered 50 small near-Earth asteroids and more than 1,100 supernovae, while observing more than 1 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy. (2019-02-08)

Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosion
Astronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Beyond just delivering a beautiful image, Hubble may well have traced the surviving remains of the exploded star's companion. (2017-03-30)

Observation of X-rays from birth of supernova leads to all-out effort to record stellar death
NASA's Swift satellite caught the rare birth of a supernova earlier this year, allowing astronomers to rapidly deploy ground-based telescopes to follow its evolution and learn about normal stellar explosions. UC Berkeley astronomers have analyzed the data to conclude that the original star was more than 30 times the mass of the sun, but only slightly larger, when its core ran out of fuel and imploded, blowing the star to smithereens. (2008-05-21)

Supernova iron found on the moon
Approximately two million years ago a star exploded in a supernova close to our solar system: Its traces can still be found today in the form of an iron isotope found on the ocean floor. Now scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), together with colleagues from the USA, have found increased concentrations of this supernova-iron in lunar samples as well. They believe both discoveries to originate from the same stellar explosion. (2016-04-14)

Blue is an indicator of first star's supernova explosions
An international collaboration led by the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe have discovered that the color of supernovae during a specific phase could be an indicator for detecting the most distant and oldest supernovae in the Universe -- more than 13 billion years old. (2016-07-11)

Observed by Texas telescope: Light from huge explosion 12 billion years ago reaches Earth
Intense light from the enormous explosion of a star 12.1 billion years ago -- shortly after the Big Bang -- recently reached Earth and was observed by the robotic telescope of Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Known as a gamma-ray burst, these rare, high-energy explosions are the catastrophic collapse of a star at the end of its life. Astronomers can analyze the observational data to draw further conclusions about the structure of the early universe. (2014-06-04)

Falling stars hold clue for understanding dying stars
An international team of researchers has proposed a new method to investigate the inner workings of supernovae explosions. This new method uses meteorites and is unique in that it can determine the contribution from electron anti-neutrinos, enigmatic particles which can't be tracked through other means. (2018-09-03)

Revealing galactic secrets
Countless galaxies vie for attention in this monster image of the Fornax Galaxy Cluster, some appearing only as pinpricks of light while others dominate the foreground. One of these is the lenticular galaxy NGC 1316. The turbulent past of this much-studied galaxy has left it with a delicate structure of loops, arcs and rings that astronomers have now imaged in greater detail than ever before with the VLT Survey Telescope. (2017-10-25)

Wispy remains of supernova explosion hide possible 'survivor'
This image, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the supernova remnant SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B. It is located 160,000 light-years from Earth in a neighboring galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud. N103B resulted from a Type Ia supernova, whose cause remains a mystery. (2017-03-30)

Violent helium reaction on white dwarf surface triggers supernova explosion
An international research team are the first to find solid evidence about what triggered a star to explode, which will contribute to a further understanding of supernova history and behavior. (2017-10-05)

Rare first moment of stellar explosion captured by amateur astronomer
An amateur astronomer testing his new camera captures the moment a supernova became visible in the night sky, which has helped an international team of researchers to test their theory about the beginning stages of a stellar explosion. (2018-02-22)

Hawaii telescopes help unravel long-standing cosmic mystery
In a paper published this week in the journal Science, scientists have, for the first time, provided evidence for a known blazar, designated TXS 0506+056, as a source of high-energy neutrinos. At 8:54 p.m. on Sept. 22, 2017, the National Science Foundation-supported IceCube neutrino observatory at the South Pole detected a high energy neutrino from a direction near the constellation Orion. Just 44 seconds later an alert went out to the entire astronomical community. (2018-07-12)

When radio galaxies collide, supermassive black holes form tightly bound pairs
Supermassive black holes found in the centers of galaxies can form gravitationally bound pairs when galaxies merge, according to a study published in the Sept. 18 issue of Nature Astronomy. (2017-09-18)

Scientists may have discovered whole new class of black holes
New research shows that astronomers' search for black holes might have been missing an entire class of black holes that they didn't know existed. In a study publishing Oct. 31, 2019 in the journal Science, astronomers offer a new way to search for black holes, and show that it is possible there is a class of black holes smaller than the smallest known black holes in the universe. (2019-10-31)

Zwicky Transient Facility sees 'first light'
A new robotic camera that can capture hundreds of thousands of stars and galaxies in a single shot has taken its first image -- an event astronomers refer to as 'first light.' The camera is the centerpiece of a new automated sky survey called the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory. As partners in the ZTF effort, University of Maryland astronomers made important contributions to the planning and design of the project. (2017-11-14)

Star exploded, survived, and exploded again more than 50 years later
It's the celestial equivalent of a horror movie villain--a star that wouldn't stay dead. An international team of astronomers including Carnegie's Nick Konidaris and Benjamin Shappee discovered a star that exploded multiple times over a period of 50 years. The finding, published by Nature, completely confounds existing knowledge of a star's end of life, and Konidaris' instrument-construction played a crucial role in analyzing the phenomenon. (2017-11-08)

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star
For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters. (2018-11-14)

Artificial intelligence classifies supernova explosions with unprecedented accuracy
Scientists from the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian have trained machine learning software to classify supernovae without the traditional use of spectra. The project--the first to use real supernovae data to inform its artificial intelligence--is 82% accurate. Currently, scientists take spectra of 10-percent of the ~10,000 supernovae discovered each year. When the Rubin Observatory goes online, only 0.1-percent of the expected supernovae discoveries will be further studied without the new software. (2020-12-17)

A fleeting blue glow
In the 2009 film 'Star Trek,' a supernova hurtles through space and obliterates a planet unfortunate enough to be in its path. Fiction, of course, but it turns out the notion is not so farfetched. (2017-08-14)

Stars exploding as supernovae lose their mass to companion stars during their lives
Stars over eight times more massive than the sun end their lives in supernovae explosions. The composition of the star influences what happens during the explosion. (2019-03-07)

Galaxy outskirts likely hunting grounds for dying massive stars and black holes
Findings from a Rochester Institute of Technology study provide further evidence that the outskirts of spiral galaxies host massive black holes. These overlooked regions are new places to observe gravitational waves created when the massive bodies collide, the authors report. (2018-07-26)

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