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Popular Synthetic Biology News and Current Events, Synthetic Biology News Articles.
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From sea to lab
With its vast numbers of different lifeforms, the sea is a largely unexplored source of natural products that could be starting points for new pharmaceuticals, such as the antitumor drugs trabectedin and lurbinectedin. (2019-02-18)
Copying made easy
Whether revealing a perpetrator with DNA evidence, diagnosing a pathogen, classifying a paleontological discovery, or determining paternity, the duplication of nucleic acids (amplification) is indispensable. (2019-03-12)
'Poring over' DNA
Church's team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard Medical School developed a new electronic DNA sequencing platform based on biologically engineered nanopores that could help overcome present limitations. (2016-10-11)
DNA 'tattoos' link adult, daughter stem cells in planarians
Using the molecular equivalent of a tattoo on DNA that adult stem cells pass to their (2008-09-10)
Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Rutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study. (2017-10-09)
A chameleon-inspired material that stiffens and changes color
Researchers have developed a new material that mimics the dynamic properties of skin as it tenses -- and that changes colors in the process. (2018-03-29)
New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases
A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. (2018-07-26)
New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating
A new simple, cost-effective approach that may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials. (2016-01-30)
Researchers create a protein 'mat' that can soak up pollution
In a breakthrough that could lead to a new class of materials with functions found only in living systems, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have figured out a way to keep certain proteins active outside of the cell. (2018-03-15)
Keeping an eye on the health of structures
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) used synthetic-aperture radar data from four different satellites, combined with statistical methods, to determine the structural deformation patterns of the largest bridge in Iran. (2018-04-12)
'Invisible' bacteria dupe the human immune system
Scientists at the University of York have characterized an important new step in the mechanism used by bacteria to evade our immune system. (2008-02-19)
Engineers hack cell biology to create 3-D shapes from living tissue
Many of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be explained with very simple instructions, UC San Francisco bioengineers report Dec. (2017-12-28)
Faster genome evolution methods to transform yeast for industrial biotechnology
A research team led by Prof. DAI Junbiao at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. (2018-05-25)
Chemists harness artificial intelligence to predict the future (of chemical reactions)
A team of researchers from Princeton University and Merck have developed state-of-the-art software to predict reaction yields while varying up to four components. (2018-02-15)
RUDN University chemists suggest a new way to synthesize steroid analogs
Scientists from RUDN University and the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv have found a way to produce aromatic rings in organic compounds in three stages. (2017-11-15)
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. (2017-05-17)
Researchers examine how opioids affect proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors
In a new study, researchers have characterized the effects of a series of opioids on proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors. (2017-12-06)
Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genes
A new study published in Nature Communications will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development. (2018-02-06)
Synthetic fuels research aims to reduce oil dependence
Researchers at Purdue University have developed a facility aimed at learning precisely how coal and biomass are broken down in reactors called gasifiers as part of a project to strengthen the scientific foundations of the synthetic fuel economy. (2010-09-15)
Let them eat xylose: Yeast engineered to grow efficiently on novel nutrients
Researchers at Tufts University have created a genetically modified yeast that can more efficiently consume a novel nutrient, xylose, enabling the yeast to grow faster and to higher cell densities, raising the prospect of a significantly faster path toward the design of new synthetic organisms for industrial applications, according to a study published today in Nature Communications. (2018-03-26)
Mice immunized with synthetic horsepox protected against vaccinia virus
Immunization with a synthetic horsepox virus offers mice similar protection to immunization with vaccinia virus against a lethal dose of vaccinia, according to a study published Jan. (2018-01-19)
Synthetic cannabis ('spice', 'k2') use may boost stroke risk in young users
Synthetic cannabis, also popularly known as 'spice' or 'k2,' may boost the risk of a stroke in young users, warn US doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2018-06-07)
Hydrogen production: This is how green algae assemble their enzymes
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analyzed how green algae manufacture complex components of a hydrogen-producing enzyme. (2017-03-27)
A synthetic chameleon has been developed
An international team of researchers including Dmitry Ivanov, the head of laboratory of functional soft-matter systems, MSU, announced the development of a synthetic chameleon skin. (2018-03-30)
Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatment
India is a second largest producer of leather, and being so, leather production and dyeing significantly contribute to pollution of water resources in India. (2017-08-29)
Osaka chemists build new chemical structures on unreactive bonds
Osaka University organic chemists transform strong carbon fluorine bonds into crowded quaternary carbon centers with cobalt catalyzed Grignard chemistry. (2017-07-26)
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynes
TUAT researchers have achieved the new synthetic route of conjugated tetraenes from inexpensive and easily available 1,3-butadiene and substituted acetylenes by a one-pot approach under mild conditions. (2018-01-15)
Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. (2018-01-19)
Sharpening the X-ray view of the nanocosm
A novel lens offers scientists the sharpest X-ray images yet from the nano world. (2018-03-23)
Bionic bacteria may help fight disease and global warming
A strain of genetically enhanced bacteria developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies may pave the way for new synthetic drugs and new ways of manufacturing medicines and biofuels, according to a paper published September 18 in Nature Chemical Biology. (2011-09-21)
Position statement: Avoid using medical marijuana to treat sleep apnea
Medical cannabis and synthetic marijuana extracts should not be used for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). (2018-04-16)
Contraception influences sexual desire in committed relationships
How often women in heterosexual couples desire sex depends on how committed the relationship is and what type of birth control the woman uses. (2016-12-08)
Interstellar molecules inspire new transformations
When illuminating with LED light, chemists at ICIQ generated carbynes, a highly reactive chemical species that allowed them to modify drugs like anticancer paclitaxel, antidepressant duloxetine and NSAID ibuprofen. (2018-01-31)
First proof a synthesized antibiotic is capable of treating superbugs
A 'game changing' new antibiotic which is capable of killing superbugs has been successfully synthesized and used to treat an infection for the first time -- and could lead to the first new class of antibiotic drug in 30 years. (2018-03-23)
HKUST-PKU physicists quantum simulate topological materials with ultracold atoms
A team of physicists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Peking University reported the observation of an SPT phase for ultracold atoms using atomic quantum simulation. (2018-03-13)
Penn biochemists streamline construction method for human artificial chromosomes
Researchers describe a new way to form an essential part of the artificial chromosome, called the centromere, by bypassing the biological requirements needed to form a natural one. (2019-07-25)
Houseplants could one day monitor home health
In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. (2018-07-20)
DSI professor conducts research to combat pancreatic cancer
Tal Danino, a professor at the Data Science Institute, is conducting research that could help scientists combat the most lethal of cancers: pancreatic cancer. (2017-10-05)
McGill research team studies how calcium compounds accumulate in the arteries
McGill research team studies how calcium compounds accumulate. (2018-01-31)
Zipping DNA
ETH researchers have developed a method that allows large amounts of genetic information to be compressed and then decompressed again in cells. (2017-11-13)
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