Popular Telemedicine News and Current Events

Popular Telemedicine News and Current Events, Telemedicine News Articles.
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WVU researchers find telemedicine may increase patient satisfaction with medical care
A recent study led by Albeir Mousa, a professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, suggests telemedicine may improve patients' satisfaction with their postoperative care as well as their quality of life. Their results have been accepted for publication in The Annals of Vascular Surgery. (2019-01-02)

Your doctor's ready: Please log in to the videoconference
The coronavirus has prompted many medical centers to switch from in-person appointments to video visits. A new study from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals suggests that for some hospitals, video visits may become a permanent feature of the patient-provider landscape. (2020-06-03)

Telemedicine as effective as in-person care for Parkinson's disease
New findings from a nationwide program that links neurologists with patients with Parkinson's disease in their homes via video conferencing shows that telemedicine can successfully deliver quality care. The study, which appears today in the journal Neurology, points to a new way to improve care for people who suffer from the disease, but may have not have access to a neurologist. (2017-08-16)

For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in half
Urban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma. (2018-01-09)

Why is some social media content interpreted as bragging?
People who post personal content on social networking sites such as Facebook and try to present themselves in a positive light may be perceived as bragging, and therefore be less attractive to others, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2017-01-31)

Social grooming factors influencing social media civility on COVID-19
A new study analyzing tweets about COVID-19 found that users with larger social networks tend to use fewer uncivil remarks when they have more positive responses from others. (2020-04-20)

Pediatric telemedicine services can work well under the right conditions
Doctors who provide pediatric care over the telephone -- known as 'telemedicine' -- face a range of challenges that do not come with traditional face-to-face contact. In a qualitative study led by Motti Haimi of Clalit Health Services at the Children's Health Center in Haifa in Israel, researchers found that physicians in a pediatric telemedicine service frequently face difficulties and challenges. (2018-08-06)

Telemedicine reduces cancellations for care during COVID in large Ohio heath center
New research shows that expanded use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic improved cancellation rates in one large Ohio health system. (2020-11-06)

Heartbeat could be used as password to access electronic health records
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have devised a new way to protect personal electronic health records using a patient's own heartbeat. (2017-01-18)

UTA study finds public-private partnerships key to making telemedicine sustainable
RadhaKanta Mahapatra, a professor in the Department of Information Systems and Operations Management in the UTA College of Business, conducted the study, A Collaborative Approach to Creating ICT-based Sustainable Development, which was published as part of the Americas Conference on Information Systems' proceedings earlier this year. ICT is Information and Communication Technology. Former Odisha Chief Secretary Sahadeva Sahoo co-authored the study. (2017-09-22)

New strategies to improve the quality of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care
1.6 million Americans suffer. As with many chronic conditions, IBD patients often require frequent hospital visits due to rapid changes in their illness and can struggle with finding the balance between their health and their work/social life. Doctors and researchers will come together at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ to explore new strategies to improve the care provided to IBD patients, which will ultimately improve patients' quality of life. (2018-01-19)

Using telemedicine to treat multiple sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) clinicians face continued challenges in optimizing neurological care, especially for people with advanced MS living in medically underserved communities. Because of insurmountable geographical and physical challenges, patients cannot always travel to neurology office appointments. Could telemedicine -- the use of telecommunication and information technology to provide clinical health care from a distance -- be effectively used to address this problem? A researcher at the University of California, Riverside is set to find out. (2017-03-10)

Telemedicine could eradicate many expensive ED visits
A community-wide study in upstate New York found that nearly 28 percent of all visits to the pediatric emergency department could have been replaced with a more cost-effective Internet doctor's (2008-05-06)

Telemedicine visits save families time and money
Patients and families who use telemedicine for sports medicine appointments saved an average of $50 in travel costs and 51 minutes in waiting and visit time, according to a new study by Nemours Children's Health System. Each telemedicine visit also saved the health system an average of $24 per patient, researchers reported at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. (2017-09-15)

Stroke patients receive clot-busting medication more than twice as fast as national rates
Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California are delivering clot-busting medication to new stroke patients more than twice as fast as the national average. This follows the regionwide adoption of an integrated telemedicine program, according to new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Stroke. (2017-12-15)

Parent-supplied photos allow pediatric dermatology diagnoses with no office visit in most cases
Using smartphone cameras, parents can reliably take high-quality photographs of their child's skin condition to send to a dermatologist for diagnosis. This finding suggests that direct-to-patient dermatology can accurately provide pediatric dermatology care. (2017-11-15)

New guidelines on best practices for videoconferencing-based telemental health
New guidance is available from the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) to assist in the development and delivery of effective and safe interactive videoconferencing-based mental health services. (2018-10-29)

ICU telemedicine reduces interhospital ICU transfers of critically ill patients
A new study in the journal CHEST® examined transfers of ICU patients to acute care centers before and after the VA implemented its Tele-ICU program. Investigators found that hospitals using Tele-ICU support experienced a greater reduction in transfers of ICU patients to other facilities than hospitals that did not use the services. Additionally, mortality did not change when more patients were treated locally through Tele-ICU. (2018-06-15)

Telemedicine aided people hit by hurricanes Harvey and Irma
Telemedicine has been used during disasters for many years, but providing such care directly to consumers only has become viable because of the widespread growth of smartphones and the creation of services that allow consumers to directly access thousands of US physicians. A new study of the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma finds that direct-to-consumer telemedicine is a viable way to deliver medical care in the days following a natural disaster. (2018-04-25)

The next step in health care: Telemedicine
Rochester Institute of Technology is collaborating with a team led by the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine that recently tested technology, which allows for the transmission of high quality, real time video to multiple locations. (2008-11-12)

'Is there a doctor on board?' A guide to managing in-flight medical emergencies
A new article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides practical tips for physicians on airplanes who may step in to help in a medical emergency. (2018-02-26)

Telemedicine provides accurate diagnosis of rare cause of blindness in preemies
Accurately detecting a rare, but devastating cause of blindness in premature babies can be done as effectively with telemedicine as with traditional, in-person eye exams, a study published in JAMA Ophthalmology suggests.The finding could enable more blindness-preventing treatment for infants born in rural and other areas where there are few ophthalmologists trained to detect the condition, called retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP. (2018-04-06)

Assessment of comatose patients through telemedicine efforts shown to be reliable
Reliable assessment of comatose patients in intensive care units is critical to the patients' care. Providers must recognize clinical status changes quickly to undertake proper interventions. But does the provider need to be in the same room as the patient, or can robotic telemedicine be used successfully to complete the assessment? According to a research study conducted at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Arizona, published in Telemedicine and e-Health, the answer is yes. (2017-01-26)

In the February Health Affairs: Telemedicine in Latin America
With doctors unevenly distributed across Latin American countries and concentrated in urban areas, patients in rural and marginal suburban areas often have limited access to both primary care physicians and specialists. (2019-02-04)

Direct-to-patient telemedicine cardiology follow-ups may safely save families time, cost
Health provider follow-ups delivered via computer or smartphone is a feasible alternative to in-person patient follow-ups for some pediatric cardiac conditions, according to the findings of a pilot study presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions this week. (2019-11-14)

Use evidence to inform Isle of Man draft abortion bill debate, urge researchers
The most up to date evidence shows that women in the Isle of Man need full spectrum, accessible abortion services, free of any age or timing restrictions, conclude researchers in an editorial, published online in BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health. (2018-01-22)

Restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland affect women's health, study shows
Despite a policy change to provide free abortion services for women traveling from Northern Ireland to clinics in Great Britain, Northern Irish women still experience multiple barriers accessing care. The study also found that some women preferred to use medication from online telemedicine services to self-manage their own abortions at home, but that the experience is dominated by fear and isolation due to the risk of prosecution. (2018-10-19)

Online abortion service can offer alternative to unsafe methods to end pregnancy
Early medical abortion using online telemedicine can offer an alternative to unsafe methods to end a pregnancy for women in countries where access to safe abortion is restricted, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2017-05-16)

Feeling blue? Taking a break from Facebook might help
A new study shows that regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life. But you don't have to quit Facebook altogether; simply changing your social networking behavior and taking an occasional break from Facebook may lift your spirits, according to the study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2016-12-20)

A molecular basis for selective therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease
The contribution of University of Aveiro researchers to the complex theme of how 'Cellular stress affects phosphorylation dependent AâPP processing' showed that, even under conditions of cellular stress, one could favour non-toxic AâPP processing by modulating intracellular protein phosphorylation systems and this, in turn, may constitute the basis for selective therapeutic intervention. (2005-10-06)

Phantom cell phone signals -- who hears them and why?
If you think you hear your cell phone ringing or feel it vibrating to signal an incoming call or message, but there actually is none, you may have 'ringxiety' and be psychologically primed to detect such signals. Insecurity in interpersonal relationships, manifested as attachment anxiety, increases the likelihood of having phantom cell phone experiences, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2016-02-04)

Combined online self-management for pain, associated anxiety and depression works
Online symptom self-management works to decrease pain, anxiety and depression and for some, online self-management plus nurse telecare helps even more according to CAMMPS study, conducted by symptoms expert and Regenstrief Institute research scientist Kurt Kroenke, MD. Pain is the most common physical symptom for which adults seek medical attention in US, while anxiety and depression are the most common mental health symptoms. All three symptoms frequently co-occur in this difficult to treat patient population. (2019-07-22)

Study examines use of telemedicine among rural medicare beneficiaries
Although the number of Medicare telemedicine visits increased more than 25 percent a year for the past decade, in 2013, less than 1 percent of rural Medicare beneficiaries received a telemedicine visit, according to a study appearing in the May 10, 2016 issue of JAMA. (2016-05-10)

Using telemedicine to bring genetic counseling to community cancer care
Genetic counseling for cancer patients has become standard of care at academic medical centers, but patients cared for at community-based medical practices across the United States may not have access to these resources. Video and phone sessions can close that gap and bring genetic counseling to patients who would not otherwise have the chance to receive it. (2018-05-30)

Many youths with diabetes not being screened as recommended for diabetic retinopathy
Many youths with type 1 and 2 diabetes are not receiving eye examinations as recommended to monitor for diabetic retinopathy, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology. (2017-03-23)

Spreading rumors on Twitter and mistaking retweets for truth
A new study of the believability of information received via Twitter and the intention to pass on a tweet -- whether news or rumor -- is influenced by the number of times the information has already been retweeted. (2017-03-22)

High-need, high-cost patients offer solutions for improving their care and reducing costs
By many estimates, only 5 percent of US patients are high-need, high-cost (HNHC), yet they account for about 50 percent of health care spending. It has become a national priority to understand the needs of this patient cohort, identify drivers of their utilization, and implement solutions to improve their clinical outcomes while reducing their costs. (2019-02-06)

Smartphone use risks eye examination misdiagnosis
Clinicians who use smartphones to capture photographs of patients' eyes risk misdiagnosis if they base their decisions on objective data extracted from non-calibrated cameras. (2019-02-07)

Telemedicine helps improve participation in clinical trials
Videos and creative uses of other visuals provide a novel way to obtain informed consent during clinical trials to improve participants' understanding and retention of trial information, according to a study by Nemours Children's Health System presented at the American Thoracic Society (ATS) Annual Conference. (2018-05-24)

Telemonitoring and automated messages improve CPAP adherence
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are more likely to use CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure, when their use is telemonitored and they receive individualized, automated messages that reinforce therapy adherence, according to a randomized, controlled trial published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2017-09-12)

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