Popular Telomeres News and Current Events

Popular Telomeres News and Current Events, Telomeres News Articles.
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Young birds suffer in the city
City life is tough for young birds. But if they survive their first year, they are less susceptible to the effects of stress, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. (2017-09-08)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

CNIO researchers cure lung fibrosis in mice with a gene therapy that lengthens telomeres
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal disease associated with the presence of critically short telomeres, currently lacking effective treatment. The Telomere and Telomerase Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has succeeded in curing this disease in mice using a gene therapy that lengthens the telomeres. This work constitutes a (2018-01-30)

Scientists find mechanisms to avoid telomere instability found in cancer and aging cells
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that a functional component of telomeres called TERRA has to constantly be kept in check to prevent telomeric and chromosomal instability, one of the underlying anomalies associated with cancer. (2018-01-22)

Epigenome-wide association study of leukocyte telomere length
In this study, the research team conducted a large-scale epigenome-wide association study of LTL using seven large cohorts the Framingham Heart Study, the Jackson Heart Study, the Womens Health Initiative, the Bogalusa Heart Study, the Lothian Birth Cohorts of 1921 and 1936, and the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. Previous studies have explored the association between DNAm and LTL, but these studies were somewhat limited due to moderate sample sizes or the focus on specific regions in the genome. (2019-08-31)

First gene therapy successful against human aging
Elizabeth Parrish, CEO of Bioviva USA Inc. has become the first human being to be successfully rejuvenated by gene therapy, after her own company's experimental therapies reversed 20 years of normal telomere shortening. (2016-04-21)

Accurate telomere length test influences treatment decisions for certain diseases
Research led by Johns Hopkins physicians and scientists shows that a test for measuring the length of DNA endcaps, called telomeres, which has a variability rate of 5 percent, can alter treatment decisions for patients with certain types of bone marrow failure. (2018-02-26)

Having children can make women's telomeres seem 11 years older
A study by George Mason University Researchers found that women who have given birth have shorter telomeres than those who haven't. Telomeres are the end caps of DNA on our chromosomes, which help in DNA replication and get shorter over time. The length of telomeres has been associated with morbidity and mortality previously, but this is the first study to examine links with having children. (2018-03-08)

New assay may help predict which pancreatic lesions may become cancerous
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, describes a new simple molecular test to detect chromosomal abnormalities -- biomarkers known as telomere fusions -- in pancreatic tumor specimens and pancreatic cyst fluids. This assay may help predict the presence of high-grade or invasive pancreatic cancers requiring surgical intervention. (2017-12-08)

Can plants tell us something about longevity?
The oldest living organism on Earth is a plant, Methuselah a bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) (pictured below) that is over 5,000 years old. Conversely, animals only live up to a few hundred years. Can we learn something from plants about longevity and stay young forever or even recapture lost youth? (2019-11-18)

Revealing the best-kept secrets of proteins
Salk scientists develop new approach to identify important undiscovered functions of proteins. (2017-12-14)

Exercise reduces stress, improves cellular health in family caregivers
Exercising at least three times a week for six months reduced stress in a group of family caregivers and even appeared to lengthen a small section of their chromosomes that is believed to slow cellular aging, new UBC research has found (2018-10-03)

Relaxed through pregnancy
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that maternal psychological wellbeing during pregnancy has a positive effect on newborn infants. Increased telomere length suggests a reduced rate of cell aging, which could have an effect on children's future health. Results from this study have been published in the American Journal of Psychiatry*. (2020-09-11)

Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancers
Researchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also tested the treatment in humanized mouse models of pediatric brain cancer. (2018-04-17)

Brothers-in-arms: How P53 and telomeres work together to stave off cancer
New research from scientists at The Wistar Institute shows that p53 is able to suppress accumulated DNA damage at telomeres. This is the first time this particular function of p53 has ever been described and shows yet another benefit of this vital gene. (2016-01-15)

Genome wide association study of epigenetic aging rates in blood reveals a critical role for TERT
Researchers from several institutions, including, UCLA, Boston University, Stanford University and the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, analyzed blood samples from nearly 10,000 people to find that genetic markers in the gene responsible for keeping telomeres (tips of chromosomes) youthfully longer, did not translate into a younger biologic age as measured by changes in proteins coating the DNA. This study was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. (2018-02-02)

Telomere length unaffected by smoking
A new study has surprised the medical world, finding that smoking does not shorten the length of telomeres -- a marker at the end of our chromosomes that is widely accepted as an indicator of aging. This suggests that adult telomere length should be considered a static biomarker that changes relatively little during adult life. The authors emphasize that this does not lessen the evidence that smoking is bad for you. (2019-06-05)

Researchers find shortened telomeres linked to dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have made a discovery about muscular dystrophy disorders that suggest new possibilities for treatment. In a study published today online in Stem Cell Reports, researchers found that stem cells in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients may, at an early age, lose their ability to regenerate new muscle, due to shortened telomeres. (2017-09-07)

Scientists unlock the molecular secret behind long-lived bat species
Scientists have identified part of the molecular mechanism that gives long-lived bat species their extraordinary lifespans compared to other animals. The findings published in the journal Science Advances point to the protective structures at the end of chromosomes, called telomeres. According to the international team of scientists, in the longest-lived species of bats (Myotis) telomeres don't shorten with age. Whereas in other bats species, humans and other animals they do causing the age-related breakdown of cells. (2018-02-07)

Air pollution may shorten telomeres in newborns -- a sign of increased health risks
A study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air. (2018-01-24)

Aging tests yield varying results
A lot of people seem willing to spend hundreds to find out whether they're aging faster or slower than their chronological age would suggest. Unfortunately, they're just going to have to wait and see. A head-to-head comparison of 11 different measures of aging, including blood and chromosome tests like those being sold commercially, has found that they don't agree with one another on how fast a given person is growing older. (2017-11-15)

Cardiovascular health linked to cellular aging
The age of a person's immune cells may predict risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016. (2016-11-13)

Newly discovered DNA sequences can protect chromosomes in rotifers
Rotifers are tough, microscopic organisms highly resistant to radiation and repeated cycles of dehydration and rehydration. Now Irina Arkhipova, Irina Yushenova, and Fernando Rodriguez of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have discovered another protective mechanism of this hardy organism: the Terminons. Their findings, which can have implications for research on aging and genome evolution, are published in Molecular Biology and Evolution. (2017-06-05)

Study of smoking and genetics illuminates complexities of blood pressure
Analyzing the genetics and smoking habits of more than half a million people has shed new light on the complexities of controlling blood pressure, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2018-02-15)

Cold-parenting linked to premature aging, increased disease risk in offspring
New research out of Loma Linda University Health suggests that unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children, even into their adult years. The study found that the telomeres -- protective caps on the ends of the strands of DNA -- of subjects who considered their mothers' parenting style as 'cold' were on average 25% smaller compared to those who reported having a mother whose parenting style they considered 'warm.' (2019-05-30)

Reducing NOVA1 gene helps prevent tumor growth in most common type of lung cancer
Researchers have identified a gene that when inhibited or reduced, in turn, reduced or prevented human non-small cell lung cancer tumors from growing. (2018-08-06)

Going with the DNA flow: Molecule of life finds new uses in microelectronics
Researchers at Arizona State University, in collaboration with NYU and Duke University, have recently designed, created and tested a DNA circuit capable of splitting and combining current, much like an adapter that can connect multiple appliances to a wall outlet. (2018-02-26)

UT Southwestern Researchers Find Way To Control Gene Activity, Opening Way For Cancer Drugs
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have developed a method to turn off a gene for telomerase, which activates the continuous division of cancer cells. This finding could aid in the creation of new cancer drugs. (1999-05-12)

Scientists create a 3-D model of molecules in yeast linked to enzyme that lengthens chromosome tips
Through the haze of a sonogram screen, an expectant mother catches a glimpse of the growing baby within her. The outline of a nose, chin and head, instantly recognizable as a tiny human, brings to life what parents, until then, could only imagine. Biologists, too, aim to bring their scientific discoveries to life by creating three-dimensional models--at the atomic level--of the inner workings of cells. (2018-01-24)

Gene coding error found in rare, inherited gene cof lung-scarring disorder linked to short telomeres
By combing through the entire genetic sequences of a person with a lung scarring disease and 13 of the person's relatives, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found a coding error in a single gene that is likely responsible for a rare form of the disease and the abnormally short protective DNA caps on chromosomes long associated with it. (2019-09-10)

Gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase gene do not increase the risk of cancer
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have shown in a new study that the gene therapy with telomerase that they have developed, and which has proven to be effective in mice against diseases caused by excessive telomere shortening and ageing, does not cause cancer or increase the risk of developing it, even in a cancer-prone setting. (2018-08-20)

Smoking and pre-eclampsia may cause fertility problems for offspring, study suggests
Low levels of oxygen in the womb -- which can be caused by smoking or conditions such as preeclampsia -- may cause problems with fertility later in life, a study carried out in rats suggests. (2019-03-29)

Telomerase-expressing liver cells regenerate the organ, Stanford researchers find
Liver stem cells that express high levels of telomerase, a protein often associated with resistance to aging, act in mice to regenerate the organ during normal cellular turnover or tissue damage, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-04-04)

Two-step process leads to cell immortalization and cancer
Immortalization of cells is a necessary step in the development of cancer, and scientists think that the main cause is turning on an enzyme -- telomerase -- that lengthens chromosomal telomeres and prevents normal cell death. A new study by UC Berkeley scientists shows that turning on telomerase is not a one-step process. In melanoma, and probably other cancers, a mutation turns up telomerase slightly, keeping the cell alive long enough for other changes that up-regulate telomerase. (2017-08-17)

Blocking two enzymes could make cancer cells mortal
EPFL scientists have identified two enzymes that protect chromosomes from oxidative damage and shortening. Blocking them might be a new anticancer strategy for stopping telomerase, the enzyme that immortalizes tumors. (2018-05-16)

Discovery by NUS researchers improves understanding of cellular aging and cancer development
A team of researchers led by Dr Dennis Kappei, a Special Fellow from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore, has discovered the role of the protein ZBTB48 in regulating both telomeres and mitochondria, which are key players involved in cellular ageing. The results of the study will contribute to a better understanding of the human ageing process as well as cancer development. (2017-06-13)

Blood biomarker can help predict disease progression in patients with COPD
Some patients with COPD demonstrate signs of accelerated aging. In a new study published in the journal CHEST® researchers report that measuring blood telomeres, a marker of aging of cells, can be used to predict future risk of the disease worsening or death. Further, they have determined that the drug azithromycin may help patients with short telomeres, an indicator of more rapid biological aging, stave off negative clinical outcomes. (2018-07-12)

Study links body fat, weight loss, and chromosome length in breast cancer patients
It is well documented that a healthy diet and exercise are key in cancer prevention and management, but the exact mechanism hasn't been clear. Now, Yale Cancer Center researchers have found an explanation in the tiny protective ends of chromosomes called telomeres. The findings will be presented Dec. 11 at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2015-12-08)

CNIO researchers find effective drug combinations for glioblastoma in mice
Glioblastoma is a brain tumour with very poor prognosis. Patients with glioblastoma usually develop resistance to treatments. Combination therapy could be an effective approach. The study carried out at CNIO provides unexpected and valuable information on cancer biology. It revealed that components in the RAS pathway, which is involved in numerous types of cancer, also participates in telomere maintenance. The study will be published in EMBO Molecular Medicine this week. (2019-06-13)

Blackbirds in the city: Bad health, longer life
Blackbirds live longer in cities than in forests. But their telomeres, the repetitive stretches of DNA at the ends of the chromosomes, show that these city birds have a much poorer health status than their rural cousins. These findings from a study in five European cities led by University of Groningen biologists were published in Biology Letters on March 21. (2018-03-20)

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