Popular Termites News and Current Events

Popular Termites News and Current Events, Termites News Articles.
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Life in marine driftwood: The case of driftwood specialist talitrids
The rare and difficult-to-sample driftwood talitrids, also called driftwood hoppers, are reviewed by David Wildish in the open access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. The scientist links these crustaceans' trend to small size (dwarfism) to the poor quality of driftwood as food, and/or the size of empty burrows they occupy. Behavioural experiments suggest that the smallest talitrids can occupy most available burrows, whereas the largest ones could complete their life cycle in 58% of them. (2017-12-20)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. The challenge now is to broaden their appeal, safely and sustainably (2017-11-10)

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History reveals ants as fungus farmers
It turns out ants, like humans, are true farmers. The difference is that ants are farming fungus. Entomologists Ted Schultz and Seán Brady at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History have published a paper in the March 24 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, providing new insight into the agricultural abilities of ants and how these abilities have evolved throughout time. (2008-03-24)

New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
A new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Measuring 0.395 mm in body length, it is also now the smallest known fly. Entomologist Brian Brown explains he named it for Schwarzenegger, apart from its 'bulging legs,' in tribute to the inspirational role the celebrity had in the scientist's teenage years. His research article is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. (2018-01-24)

The social evolution of termites
Similar genes involved in the evolution of insect societies as in bees and ants. (2018-02-07)

Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes
A new study finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common -- despite the fact that they are separated by millions of years of evolution. (2017-12-06)

America's smallest dinosaur uncovered
An unusual breed of dinosaur that was the size of a chicken, ran on two legs and scoured the ancient forest floor for termites is the smallest dinosaur species found in North America, according to a University of Calgary researcher who analyzed bones found during the excavation of an ancient bone bed near Red Deer, Alberta, in 2002. The discovery is reported in the current issue of Creteaceous Research. (2008-09-23)

Termites' unique gut 'factory' key to global domination
Termites have achieved ecological dominance and now some ingredients for their success have been determined to lie in their unique gut microbiome 'factories' -- which enable the creatures to eat wood and other material relatively free of competition. New research shows the majority of termite gut microorganisms is not found in any other animals and that they are not only inherited from parents but are also shared across colonies and among distantly related termite species. (2018-02-08)

Little wasp bodies means little wasp brain regions, study shows
A Drexel study looking at 19 species of paper wasps found that body size may lead to variation in the complex parts of their brains. (2018-01-03)

Termite gut holds a secret to breaking down plant biomass
In the Microbial Sciences Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the incredibly efficient eating habits of a fungus-cultivating termite are surprising even to those well acquainted with the insect's natural gift for turning wood to dust. (2017-04-17)

How forest termites protect tropical forests from drought
The efforts of tiny forest termites have a big effect on the harmful ecological effects of drought in tropical rainforests, according to a new study, which reveals their important role in maintaining ecosystem function during periods of extended aridity. (2019-01-10)

Cockroach ancient geographic and genomic history traced back to last supercontinent
Armed with a vast amount of genomic information, a team of researchers led by Dr. Thomas Bourguignon, now professor at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, has performed the first molecular dating to gain the clearest picture yet of the biogeographical history of cockroaches. They have traced back the key evolutionary time points of the cockroach -- all the way back almost 300 million years ago when the Earth's mass was organized into the Pangaea supercontinent. (2018-02-06)

Evolutionary origin of termite gut microbiome revealed
Researchers have shown that the bacterial communities in termite guts came about through both inheritance and transfer between colonies. (2018-02-16)

Long-haired microbes named after Canadian band Rush
Three new species of microbe found in the guts of termites have been named after members of the Canadian prog-rock band Rush, owing to the microbes' long hair and rhythmic wriggling under the microscope. (2017-11-27)

Termite queen, king recognition pheromone identified
Forget the bows and curtsies. Worker termites shake in the presence of their queens and kings. New research explains how these workers smell a royal presence. (2018-03-19)

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood
Scientists studying gribble -- a curious wood-eating crustacean -- have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future. (2018-12-03)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, November 2005
Story tips from the US DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory include: Environment - Carbon and climate; Energy - Better buildings; Environment - Eliminating kudzu. (2005-11-14)

Medical care for wounded ants
Ants dress the wounds their mates have suffered in battle. Such behavior is believed to be unique among animals. (2018-02-13)

Ants rescue their injured
Ants operate a unique rescue system: when an insect is injured during a fight, it calls for help. Its mates will then carry it back to the nest for recovery. (2017-04-12)

Termites mitigate effects of drought in Tropical Rainforest
Termites are commonly regarded as one of the most destructive insect pests, yet its unknown side was recently revealed by a major new study published in the prestigious journal Science -- the collaborative research co-led by Dr Louise Ashton of the University of Hong Kong, with researchers from the University of Liverpool and the Natural History Museum, London, has discovered that termites actually help mitigate against the effects of drought in tropical rain forests. (2019-01-10)

Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)

Matabele ants: Travelling faster with detours
Ants do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their journey. (2018-05-18)

Logging means ants, worms and other invertebrates lose rainforest dominance
Logging slashes the abundance of invertebrates like ants and earthworms but new research shows vertebrates can take up their roles in the ecosystem. (2015-04-13)

Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees
Much of the variation in the behavior among wild chimpanzee groups may be akin to 'cultural' variation in humans. Behavioral diversity is also a facet of biodiversity, but has not been considered as an additional concern until recently. Recent analysis revealed a strong and robust pattern -- chimpanzee behavioral diversity was reduced by 88 percent when human impact was highest compared to locations with the least human impact. (2019-03-07)

Researchers get to the bottom of fairy circles
Fairy circles are round gaps in arid grassland that are distributed very uniformly over the landscape and only occur along the Namib Desert in southern Africa and in parts of Australia. Scientists from the University of Göttingen, Australia and Israel have got to the bottom of this with soil investigations and drones. The results suggest Australian fairy circles were caused by processes like the weathering of the soil by heavy rainfall, extreme heat and evaporation. (2019-02-21)

Researchers look for dawn of human information sharing
Researchers are challenging a widely accepted notion, first advanced by paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey, that a 2 million-year-old rock represents the dawn of human ancestors sharing information with each other. (2017-11-01)

Termite queens' efficient antioxidant system may enable long life
Termite queens have an efficient antioxidant system which may underpin their ability to live longer than non-reproductive termites, according to a study published Jan. 11, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eisuke Tasaki from Tottori and Yamaguchi Universities, Japan, and colleagues. (2017-01-11)

Brazilian scarab beetles found to be termitophiles
An international team of scientists has provided the first record of chafer leaf beetles (Leucothyreus suturalis) living in the nests of two different termite species in Brazil. Their observations are published in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America. (2015-01-13)

Some female termites can reproduce without males
Populations of the termite species Glyptotermes nakajimai can form successful, reproducing colonies in absence of males, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Biology. (2018-09-24)

Rough terrain? No problem for beaver-inspired autonomous robot
University at Buffalo researchers are using stigmergy, a biological phenomenon that has been used to explain everything from the behavior of termites and beavers to the popularity of Wikipedia, to build new problem-solving autonomous robots. (2018-06-27)

Insect scientists to meet in Lincoln, Neb., in June
More than 300 entomologists from the United States and Canada will attend the 67th Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America's North Central Branch in downtown Lincoln, Neb., June 3-6, 2012, at the Embassy Suites Hotel. (2012-05-06)

Aardvarks' fate points to worrying consequences for wildlife, due to climate change
Aardvarks prove to be highly susceptible to the warmer and drier climates that are predicted for the western parts of southern Africa in the future. During the study of a number of aardvarks by researchers of the Brain Function Research Group at the University of the Witwatersrand, all but one of the study animals -- as well as other aardvarks in the area -- died because of a severe drought, with air temperatures much higher than normal and very dry soil in the area. (2017-07-31)

Advanced animal society thrives without males
Termite colonies have been found to thrive and reproduce without males, new research from the University of Sydney reveals. The findings provide new evidence that males aren't required to maintain some advanced animal populations. They add momentum to questions about the impact and function of males in animal societies. (2018-09-24)

Beetles cooperate in brood care
Ambrosia beetles are fascinating: they practice agriculture with fungi and they live in a highly developed social system. Biologist Peter Biedermann has now discovered new facts about them. (2020-11-04)

4,000-year-old termite mounds found in Brazil are visible from space
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. 19 have found that a vast array of regularly spaced, still-inhabited termite mounds in northeastern Brazil--covering an area the size of Great Britain -- are up to about 4,000 years old. (2018-11-19)

Two bacteria better than one in cellulose-fed fuel cell
No currently known bacteria that allow termites and cows to digest cellulose, can power a microbial fuel cell and those bacteria that can produce electrical current cannot eat cellulose. But careful pairing of bacteria can create a fuel cell that consumes cellulose and produces electricity, according to a team of Penn State researchers. (2007-07-27)

99-million-year-old termite-loving thieves caught in Burmese amber
A research team led by NIGPAS reported the oldest, morphologically specialized, and obligate termitophiles from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, which represent the oldest known termitophiles, and reveal that ancient termite societies were quickly invaded by beetles about 99 million years ago. (2017-04-13)

Tiny termite house: How termites destroy from the inside out
The National Pest Management Association has revealed a high-definition, behind-the-walls look at the destructive nature of termites through the Tiny Termite House, a first-of-its-kind, groundbreaking research study and video production. (2018-06-13)

Sponge cells build skeletons with pole-and-beam structure
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Sept. 17 have found that sponges build their skeletons in a completely different way than other animals do. In fact, the building process looks a lot like the construction of man-made buildings, minus the architectural plans. (2015-09-17)

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