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Popular Threat News and Current Events, Threat News Articles.
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How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Fight or flight: Serotonin neurons prompt brain to make the right call
Known for its role in relieving depression, the neurochemical serotonin may also help the brain execute instantaneous, appropriate behaviors in emergency situations, according to a new Cornell study published Feb. 1 in Science. (2019-01-31)

Researchers examine social identity threat and religion in the US
When people feel targeted because of their religious identity, they can experience a psychological threat that may undermine psychological well-being and increase prejudice toward other groups, according to a new study by Penn State psychologists. (2017-11-14)

Primates in peril
International experts call for immediate action to protect endangered primate species. (2018-06-15)

Math + good posture = better scores
A San Francisco State University study finding that students perform better at math while sitting with good posture could have implications for other kinds of performance under pressure. (2018-08-03)

Study finds strong support for ocean protection
People around the world strongly support ocean conservation measures, according to a new study of public perceptions of marine threats and protection. (2018-01-10)

New research suggests your imagination really can set you free from fear
Mount Sinai study discovers that imagining threats can weaken reactions to them by suppressing perceptual and learning neural mechanisms. (2018-11-21)

Bees grooming each other can boost colony immunity
Honeybees that specialise in grooming their nestmates (allogroomers) to ward off pests play a central role in the colony, finds a new UCL and University of Florence study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-02)

Neuroscientists explore the risky business of self-preservation
Northwestern University researchers have learned that the escape response for prey is more nuanced than previously thought. In a study of larval zebrafish, the researchers are the first to find that the animal's innate escape response incorporates the speed of the approaching predator -- not just the proximity of the predator -- in its calculation of how best to flee. The new information can help scientists understand the neural mechanics that fuel the most elemental self-preservation instincts. (2017-09-07)

Certain smiles aren't all they're cracked up to be
Researchers measured cortisol levels in the saliva of male undergraduate students as an indicator of HPA axis activity. They discovered that 'dominance' smiles, which challenge social standing and signal disapproval, were associated with higher HPA axis activity, such as increases in heart rate and salivary cortisol. Individuals perceiving 'dominance' smiles also took longer to return to their baseline cortisol levels after the stressful event. These physical responses to 'dominance' smiles mirror the influences of negative verbal feedback. (2018-03-01)

Finnish forest management guidelines fail to protect the flying squirrel
A new study determined the habitat requirements for flying squirrels and compared them to those included in the recently amended Forest Act. The main finding was that the Finnish Nature Conservation Act does not adequately protect the old growth forests where flying squirrels live. (2018-06-26)

Overcoming barriers to improve mental-health services in low- and middle-income countries
Despite the publication of high-profile reports and promising activities in several countries, progress in mental health service development has been slow in most low-income and middle income countries. (2007-09-03)

How consumers responded to COVID-19
The coronavirus pandemic has been a catalyst for laying out the different threats that consumers face, and that consumers must prepare themselves for a constantly shifting landscape moving forward. A new study sets a framework for researchers to explore these topics and identify the needs of consumers during disruptive times. (2020-10-12)

Changing the consequences of national trauma
New research led by social psychologist Bernhard Leidner at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will look at the consequences of violent trauma for groups and nations and investigate what victims and perpetrators can learn from it to avoid future trauma and conflict. (2016-10-13)

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences
With much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the future, including their perception of the risk. (2018-04-16)

Key to 'superbug' antibiotic resistance discovered
An international study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance. (2017-05-16)

Queen's University scientist warns of asteroid danger
A leading astrophysicist from Queen's University Belfast has warned that an asteroid strike is just a matter of time. (2017-06-20)

Round Goby invade Great Lakes
A team of scientists from the University of Toronto, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and the University of Guelph has identified a drastic invasion of round goby into many Great Lakes tributaries, including several areas of the Thames, Sydenham, Ausable and Grand Rivers. A number of the affected areas are known as (2009-08-11)

Fruit fly species can learn each other's dialects
Fruit flies from different species can warn each other when parasitic wasps are near. But according to a new study led by Balint Z. Kacsoh of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, published July 19th in PLOS Genetics, they are more likely to get the message across if the fly species have previously cohabited and learned each other's dialects. (2018-07-19)

Moving toward a future free of drug-induced hearing loss
A new special publication orchestrated by five of the nation's leading hearing experts compiles the latest research into hearing loss caused by drugs and solvents -- how it occurs, how to treat it, and how to prevent it. The compilation is being published online as a special research topic by the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience. (2018-03-06)

The dynamics of mercury toxins in the oceans' food web
Methylmercury, a toxic form of mercury that is readily absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract and can cause in a variety of health issues, poses a significant threat to marine animals at the top of the food web. (2015-08-18)

Balloons the number 1 marine debris risk of mortality for seabirds
A new IMAS and CSIRO collaborative study has found that balloons are the highest-risk plastic debris item for seabirds -- 32 times more likely to kill than ingesting hard plastics. Researchers from IMAS, CSIRO and ACE CRC looked at the cause of death of 1733 seabirds from 51 species and found that one in three of the birds had ingested marine debris. (2019-03-01)

Amazon under threat from cleaner air
The Amazon rainforest, so crucial to the Earth's climate system, is coming under threat from cleaner air say prominent UK and Brazilian climate scientists in the leading scientific journal Nature. The new study identifies a link between reducing sulphur dioxide emissions from burning coal and increasing sea surface temperatures in the tropical north Atlantic, resulting in a heightened risk of drought in the Amazon rainforest. (2008-05-07)

Psychopaths feel fear but see no danger
Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen found proof that psychopathic individuals can feel fear, but have trouble in the automatic detection and responsivity to threat. (2016-08-30)

Idle talk or fierce competition? Research finds women use gossip as a weapon in rivalries
A researcher finds women use gossip as a technique to enhance their standing in romantic rivalries. (2018-05-09)

How news coverage of terrorism may shape support for anti-Muslim policies
Terrorist attacks committed by the so-called Islamic State are rising in Western countries. A new Political Psychology study indicates that how the news media portray these attacks may influence emotional responses and support for anti-Muslim policies such as immigration bans. (2019-02-21)

Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. (2018-12-11)

Boosting glutamate reduces anxiety in monkeys
Researchers studying male and female marmosets have homed in on the primate brain circuitry responsible for individual differences in overall anxiety. Their findings, published in JNeurosci, show that increasing levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the hippocampus normalizes anxious monkeys' 'fight or flight' response. (2019-02-04)

Tackling the threat of nuclear terrorism
The only effective way to tackle the threat of nuclear terrorism is to abolish nuclear weapons and establish strict international control of all fissile materials that could be used to make new weapons, argue three US physicians in this week's BMJ. (2002-02-07)

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenas
Cheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill. (2018-04-10)

US-Russia-China cooperation could hinder the proliferation of hypersonic missiles
A new RAND report proposes that despite their differences, Russia, China and the United States should act jointly to head off a little-recognized security threat -- the proliferation of hypersonic missiles beyond the three nations. (2017-09-27)

Millions on prescription sleeping pills would sleep through a fire alarm
Widely prescribed 'benzodiazepine' sleeping pills suppress the sleeping brain's ability to wake us when it senses a threat. But an alternative class of hypnotics currently under development could allow users to rouse in the event of an earthquake, fire alarm or intruder, according to a new study. Published in Frontiers Behavioral Neuroscience, the research takes millions closer to sleeping safe and sound. (2019-01-11)

Women beat expectations when playing chess against men
Data from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than 5 million chess matches suggest that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to new findings published in Psychological Science. The study results indicate that women players are not affected by negative stereotypes about women's chess abilities during competition games, in contrast with previous research on the phenomenon of (2018-01-30)

Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated
According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. These findings suggest that management strategies for this species are outdated. (2018-07-24)

Thinking about germs makes people concerned about how they look
People who worry a lot about germs appear also to be especially concerned about their physical appearance, a new study shows. (2017-12-18)

Study examines how heartfelt guilt affects individuals
For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity. (2018-09-19)

European workers fail to maintain water balance
A newly published scientific paper indicates that occupational safety and daily day performance in seven out of 10 workers, from several European industries, is negatively affected by a combination of heat stress and failure to maintain water balance. The study combines field observations and motor-cognitive testing in the lab, and was conducted by the Pan-European Heat-Shield project coordinated by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at University of Copenhagen. (2018-10-31)

Take a step back from yourself to better realize the benefits of awe
Religion and nature can both lead to awe, and turning to one or the other is a common coping strategy for the stress. But an awe-inspiring experience can have negative consequences as well as benefits, according to a novel UB-led study that uses cardiovascular responses to stress to take a broad look at awe and the critical role perspective plays when considering the effects of encountering awe. (2018-09-24)

Novel therapies for multidrug-resistant bacteria
Scientists at the University of Surrey in collaboration with research partners at the University of Sheffield and University of W├╝rzburg, Germany, have developed novel antimicrobials, which could be used to treat infections, caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. (2017-10-23)

Bat influenza viruses could infect humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. (2019-02-20)

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