Popular Tooth Decay News and Current Events

Popular Tooth Decay News and Current Events, Tooth Decay News Articles.
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A tougher tooth
Fewer trips to the dentist may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank. (2017-08-21)

Poor dental health increases risks of frailty in older men
Over a three-year period, researchers from the United Kingdom examined the relationship between poor oral health and older adults' risks for becoming frail. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2018-01-04)

New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Chemists from the MSU have explained the origin of the green fluorescence
The members of the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with Danish molecular physicists have revealed the mechanism, determining the sensitivity of the green fluorescent protein to light exposure. The scientists have proved that an isolated chromophore group is capable of emitting light outside the protein environment, while the protein function is to enhance its fluorescent properties. (2017-09-06)

The Lancet Public Health: UK soft drinks industry levy estimated to have significant health benefits, especially among children
The UK soft drinks industry levy, due to be introduced in April 2018, is estimated to have significant health benefits, especially among children, according to the first study to estimate its health impact, published in The Lancet Public Health. (2016-12-15)

Study shows influence of surgeons on likelihood of removal of healthy breast after breast cancer dia
Attending surgeons can have a strong influence on whether a patient undergoes contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after a diagnosis of breast cancer, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery. (2017-09-13)

McGill researchers find oldest rocks on Earth
McGill University researchers have discovered the oldest rocks on Earth -- a discovery which sheds more light on our planet's mysterious beginnings. These rocks, known as (2008-09-25)

Poor oral health may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer among African American women
African American women with poor oral health may be more likely to get pancreatic cancer (PC). (2019-03-28)

The curse of zombie fossils
Palaeontologists investigate the macabre science behind how animals decay and fossilize. (2018-03-21)

Primary care physicians report feeling unprepared for role in prenatal oral health
A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that primary care physicians may feel underequipped to provide adequate oral health counseling to pregnant women. Poor maternal oral health can have significant impacts on a woman's overall health and the health of her children. (2018-03-19)

Study: Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals
Researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for root canal patients and clinicians. (2017-06-12)

Lack of guidance may delay a child's first trip to the dentist
Without a doctor or dentist's guidance, some parents don't follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds. (2018-02-19)

Plants are 'biting' back
Calcium phosphate is a widespread biomineral in the animal kingdom: Bones and teeth largely consist of this very tough mineral substance. Researchers from Bonn University could now for the first time demonstrate the presence of calcium phosphate as a structural biomineral in higher plants. The substance provides the necessary 'bite' to the stinging hairs of representatives of the rock nettle family (Loasaceae). It hardens the trichomes, which serve as a herbivore defense. (2016-05-19)

Once revolutionary, now dominant: OCT still shows rich potential for new applications
The revolutionizing technology of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is celebrated in a special section of the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Detailed to the microscopic scale and noninvasive, OCT yields 3-D images of tissues inside the body and is a dominant diagnostic tool in ophthalmology with potential in numerous other areas. (2018-01-10)

Seasonal variation in daylight influences brain function
A Finnish research group has studied how seasons influence the function of the brain. Researchers at the Turku PET Centre showed that the length of daylight affects the opioid receptors, which in turn regulates the mood we experience. (2021-02-23)

Cranberry sauce: good for what ails you
Cranberry sauce is not the star of the traditional Thanksgiving Day meal, but when it comes to health benefits, the lowly condiment takes center stage. In fact, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute have found that compounds in cranberries are able to alter E. coli bacteria, which are responsible for a host of human illnesses, in ways that render them unable to initiate an infection. (2007-11-13)

What teeth reveal about the lives of modern humans
When anthropologists of the future find our fossilized teeth, what will they be able to conclude about our lives? Debbie Guatelli-Steinberg has an idea. (2017-01-09)

Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decay
A scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2018-01-22)

Unresolved puzzles in exotic nuclei
In a new review published in EPJ A, Terry Fortune from the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, USA, discusses the structure of unstable and unbound forms of Helium, Lithium, and Beryllium nuclei that have unusually large neutron to proton ratios -- dubbed 'exotic' light nuclei. Many unstable atomic nuclei live long enough to be able serve as targets for further nuclear reactions -- especially in hot environments like the interior of stars. (2018-03-27)

Nanoparticles hitchhiking their way along strands of hair
In shampoo ads, hair always looks like a shiny, smooth surface. But for physicists peering into microscopes, the hair surface looks much more rugged, as it is made of saw-tooth, ratchet-like scales. In a new theoretical study published in EPJ E, Matthias Radtke and Roland Netz have demonstrated that massaging hair can help to apply drug treatment -- encapsulated in nanoparticles trapped in the channels formed around individual hairs -- to the hair roots. (2017-01-27)

Overweight kids have fewer cavities, new study shows
Contrary to conventional wisdom, overweight children have fewer cavities and healthier teeth compared to their normal weight peers. (2008-04-02)

Captured electrons excite nuclei to higher energy states
For the first time, scientists demonstrated a long-theorized nuclear effect called nuclear excitation by electron capture. This advance tests theoretical models that describe how nuclear and atomic realms interact and may also provide new insights into how star elements are created. (2018-02-12)

Health labels may deter people from buying sugary drinks
Young adults are less likely to buy sugar-sweetened beverages that include health labels, particularly those with graphic warnings about how added sugar can lead to tooth decay, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. (2018-05-24)

Microbial 'cheaters' help scientists ID 'social' genes
The first genome-wide search for genes governing social behavior has found that even the simplest social creatures -- the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum -- have more than 100 genes that help regulate cooperative behavior. The study by scientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine was published online today by Nature. It marks one of the first large-scale attempts to combine evolutionary biology with genomics in a systematic search for genes tied to social behavior. (2008-02-13)

New device uses biochemistry techniques to detect rare radioactive decays
UTA researchers are now taking advantage of a biochemistry technique that uses fluorescence to detect ions to identify the product of a radioactive decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that would demonstrate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle. (2018-03-27)

Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser
A collaboration of scientists has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. In the study published in Nature Physics, they were able to carefully follow, one x-ray at a time, the decay of nuclei in a perfect crystal after excitation with a flash of x-rays. They observed a dramatic reduction of the time taken to emit the first x-ray as the number of x-rays increased. (2017-12-15)

Study suggests vaping does not stain teeth
Scientists at British American Tobacco have studied the impact of the vapor from Vype, an e-cigarette and glo, a tobacco-heating-product, on teeth and compared it to that of cigarette smoke. The results show that teeth exposed to Vype e-cigarette vapor or vapor from glo do not become stained, whereas teeth exposed to cigarette smoke became stained very quickly. (2018-03-24)

Dental implants preferred option for aging bridges
Aging dental bridges are a maintenance headache and a recipe for oral-health disaster. They are difficult to floss, often decay, and require replacement with longer bridges. According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, these bridges to nowhere should be replaced with permanent dental implants. (2008-05-29)

A new technology for producing nano-hydroxyapatite developed by Lobachevsky University chemists
Today, deterioration of human health is one of the most pressing problems that modern medicine is facing. First of all, it concerns the widespread degradation of hard tissues -- bones and teeth. To solve this problem, it is necessary to create medical materials capable of restoring the structure of hard tissues. The chemical basis of such materials is provided by hydroxyapatite, an inorganic compound, which is one of the main components of bones and teeth. (2017-12-12)

New antibacterial fillings from Tel Aviv University may combat recurring tooth decay
A new study by Tel Aviv University researchers finds potent antibacterial capabilities in novel dental restoratives, or filling materials. (2019-07-09)

These dinosaurs lost their teeth as they grew up
By comparing the fossilized remains of 13 ceratosaurian theropod dinosaurs known as Limusaurus inextricabilis collected from the Upper Jurassic Shishugou Formation of northwestern China, researchers have been able to reconstruct the dinosaur's growth and development from a young hatchling of less than a year to the age of 10. The findings, reported in Current Biology, uncovered something unexpected: the dinosaurs had teeth as young juveniles that were gradually lost as they grew up. (2016-12-22)

Larger families linked to heightened tooth loss risk for moms
Having a larger family is linked to a heightened tooth loss risk for moms, suggest the results of a large European study published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2018-03-13)

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavities
Researchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities. (2018-04-12)

Walker receives Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award
Alan Walker, Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Biology was awarded the Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017 by the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. (2017-01-24)

Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey, new UW Oshkosh research shows
New research from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. In a study published last week in the peer-reviewed journal Peerj--the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, UWO scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed on a large plant-eating dinosaur, even though it lacked the bone-crushing abilities it would develop as an adult. (2019-03-11)

Xylitol reduces risk of cavities
The sugar substitute xylitol affects the bacterial composition of the oral cavity even in low doses. On the other hand, a relatively high intake is needed to counteract the production of acid between the teeth, according to Pernilla Lif Holgerson in the dissertation she will defend at UmeƄ University in Sweden on February 23. (2007-02-15)

Six-decade-old space mystery solved with shoebox-sized satellite called a CubeSat
A 60-year-old mystery about the source of energetic, potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts has been solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by students. The satellite is called a CubeSat. (2017-12-14)

Family doctors could better detect child neglect with increased dental health training
New research now suggests that GPs lack the awareness and training to identify dental neglect in children, and therefore could miss the opportunity to share potential cases of wider abuse or neglect to other health and welfare professionals. The study in The British Dental Journal was led by Sascha Colgan, consultant GP and visiting researcher at the University of Southampton in the UK, and was published by Springer Nature. (2018-05-10)

Geologists push back date basins formed, supporting frozen Earth theory
Even in geology, it's not often a date gets revised by 500 million years. But University of Florida geologists say they have found strong evidence that a half-dozen major basins in India were formed a billion or more years ago, making them at least 500 million years older than commonly thought. (2008-07-03)

Magnetic teeth hold promise for materials and energy
For the first time, a team led by Okayama University and the University of California, Riverside has discovered a piece of the genetic puzzle that allows the chiton to produce magnetite nanomaterials. (2019-02-01)

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