Popular Touch News and Current Events

Popular Touch News and Current Events, Touch News Articles.
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New technology enables man to hold his granddaughter again
In the first known study of how amputees use advanced sensory-enabled prostheses outside the lab, subjects used a mechanical hand more regularly and for longer periods of time compared to traditional prostheses--and also reported a greater sense of psychosocial well-being. The study also asserts that sensory feedback fundamentally changed how the study participants used their mechanical attachment, ''transforming it from a sporadically used tool into a readily and frequently used 'hand.''' (2018-06-29)

Get dressed!
Computer scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Google Brain, Google's artificial intelligence research arm, have devised a novel computational method, driven by machine learning techniques, to successfully and realistically simulate the multi-step process of putting on clothes. The new method will be presented at SIGGRAPH Asia 2018 (2018-11-20)

Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. Now, much like that scene, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered a new insight into how the complex neural map of the human brain operates. (2019-11-05)

Artificial fingertip that 'feels' wins international robotics competition
An open-source 3-D-printed fingertip that can 'feel' in a similar way to the human sense of touch has won an international Soft Robotics competition for its contribution to soft robotics research. (2017-01-18)

At attention, molecules!
University of Iowa chemists have learned about a molecular assembly that may help create quicker, more responsive touch screens, among other applications. The researchers report the interfacial layer -- when molecules interact with a surface -- of electrically charged fluids called ionic liquids is thicker than previously known. Results appear in the journal Langmuir. (2016-05-17)

How cells protect themselves against mechanical stress
The Piezo1 and Piezo2 ion channels are known to open up response to the slightest mechanical stimulus. MDC researchers have now discovered that the channels are also sensitive to changes in membrane voltage. The voltage sensitivity appears to be an ancient property of these channels that protects cells from mechanical stress. (2018-03-15)

How to trick electrons to see the hidden face of crystals
The 3D analysis of crystal structures requires a full 3D view of the crystals. Crystals as small as powder, with edges less than one micrometer, can only be analysed with electron radiation. With electron crystallography, a full 360-degree view of a single crystal is technically impossible. A team of researchers from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna modified the holder of the tiny crystals so that a full view becomes possible. (2019-07-25)

How the brain responds to texture
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that as neurons process information about texture from the skin, they each respond differently to various features of a surface, creating a high-dimensional representation of texture in the brain. (2019-02-08)

Neuropathic pain unmasks subliminal excitation in pain processing circuits
Research by Steven Prescott, at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, sheds new light on the mechanism underlying the establishment of neuropathic pain. Experiments by Kwan Lee and Stéphanie Ratté in the Prescott lab show that dysregulation of chloride reduces inhibition across pain processing circuits, unmasking vast amounts of subliminal excitation in neurons that promote transmission of pain signals. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, on June 1, in Toronto. (2016-06-01)

How a bunch of bird brains led to the development of touch screens
During WWII, B.F. Skinner and scientists at NIST worked on a project that trained pigeons to be bomber pilots. Although the birds never did any actual missions, the results helped to create modern touch screens. (2017-08-31)

Electronic skin stretched to new limits
A metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics. (2018-06-15)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universität Bochum. (2019-11-25)

Pucker up, baby! Lips take center stage in infants' brains, study says
Researchers used brain imaging to gauge how the hand, foot and lips are represented in the brains of 2-month-olds -- a much younger age than has been studied previously. It is believed to be the first to reveal the greater neurological activity associated with the lips than with other body parts represented in the infant brain. It also indicates how soon infants' brains begin to make sense of their bodies, a first step toward other developmental milestones. (2018-07-09)

UCLA scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body. (2018-01-11)

Leaders and managers should be taught how to 'love' their staff
Chartered Psychologist (Occupational) Dr. Fiona Beddoes-Jones, in a study of over 300 managers/leaders, found the majority of respondents were dissatisfied with the level of warmth and care displayed at work and believed that their wellbeing would be improved if there was more 'love.' (2017-01-05)

Touch can produce detailed, lasting memories
Exploring objects through touch can generate detailed, durable memories for those objects, even when we don't intend to memorize the object's details, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-11-27)

Vision, sensory and motor testing could predict best batters in baseball
Duke Health researchers found players with higher scores on computer-based vision and motor tasks had better on-base percentages, more walks and fewer strikeouts -- collectively referred to as plate discipline -- compared to their peers. (2018-01-08)

Overactive nerves in head and neck may account for 'ringing in the ears'
Baby boomers know all too well that (2008-01-10)

Worm uploaded to a computer and trained to balance a pole
The tiny worm C. elegans is the only living being whose neural network has been analyzed completely. It can therefore be transferred to a computer, creating a virtual copy of the worm which behaves in exactly the same way to external stimuli. Such a 'virtual worm' can learn amazing tricks -- its neural network can even be used to balance a pole, which is a standard control problem in computer science. (2018-02-06)

Sound changes the way rodents sense touch
Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report how the somatosensory cortex interprets tactile and auditory stimulation in mice and rats. They show that the barrel cortex response to auditory and tactile stimuli is additive, but also with different electrophysiological properties. The study provides new insights on how multimodal senses are interpreted by the brain. (2018-12-28)

An artificial skin that can help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and -- thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism -- has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements. Applications for the new technology range from medical rehabilitation to virtual reality. (2019-09-27)

Gently stroking babies before medical procedures may reduce pain processing
Researchers found that gently stroking a baby seems to reduce activity in the infant brain associated with painful experiences. Their results, appearing Dec. 17 in the journal Current Biology, suggest that lightly brushing an infant at a certain speed -- of approximately 3 centimeters per second -- could provide effective pain relief before clinically necessary medical procedures. (2018-12-17)

A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learning
A new study from the University of Washington Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences provides one of the first looks inside the infant's brain to show where the sense of touch is processed -- not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult's hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy. (2018-01-16)

LINDSAY: The future of medical education
Researchers at the University of Calgary have created a new, interactive tool that will change the way medical education is taught. It can also be used in other applications. (2012-07-16)

Nursing home workers often fail to change gloves, risking spread of infection: New study
The failure to change gloves is common among certified nursing assistants, and may be a significant cause of the spread of dangerous pathogens in nursing homes and long-term healthcare settings, according to a new study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. (2017-09-08)

Study shows massage helps ease arthritis pain, improve mobility
Patients with arthritis in their knees experienced significant improvement in pain and mobility after undergoing a weekly, whole-body massage for two months, according to a study led by researchers at Duke Health. (2018-12-13)

Prosthetic arms can provide controlled sensory feedback, study finds
Losing an arm doesn't have to mean losing all sense of touch, thanks to prosthetic arms that stimulate nerves with mild electrical feedback. University of Illinois researchers have developed a control algorithm that regulates the current so a prosthetics user feels steady sensation, even when the electrodes begin to peel off or when sweat builds up. (2018-04-26)

Collecting the right quantity of evidence: How the brain makes a difficult decision
New research conducted in the Cognitive Neuroscience group of SISSA shows that a perceptual decision - recognizing an object and taking the appropriate action - is triggered as soon as the brain's processing networks accumulate the exact right quantity of sensory information. The studies uncover fundamental brain mechanisms underlying decision making in an uncertain world. (2019-04-19)

What grosses out a chimpanzee?
Chimps show increased latencies to feed, and tendencies to maintain greater distances from possible contaminants and/or outright refusals to consume food in test conditions, hinting at the origins of disgust in humans. (2017-11-17)

SDSU-led team developing instruments to detect language problems earlier
Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children's general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children at risk for language problems a full two years earlier than prior studies. (2018-11-12)

Plants can use underground communication to find out when neighbors are stressed
Corn seedlings that grow close together give off underground signals that impact the growth of nearby plants, reports a study published May 2, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Velemir Ninkovic from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and colleagues. (2018-05-02)

Digitalisation meets the Middle Ages
Smartphones and touchscreens could turn museum visits into a digital and multimedia experience. In the months ahead, an example of this can be seen in Admont Abbey in Austria. In a special exhibition, the abbey is presenting fragments of the 'Admonter Abrogans', a Latin-German dictionary from the period of around 800. The cultural treasures have been made accessible through a multi-media presentation, which researchers of the Institute of Creative\Media/Technologies at St. Pölten University of Applied Sciences (Austria) has designed. (2018-06-22)

Handwriting: The foodie font of love
For restaurants, conveying a sense of love could be as simple as picking a different menu font. A recent study found that when restaurant diners read healthy food options printed on the menu in a typeface that appears handwritten, they were more likely to believe that the menu options were better for their bodies, made of better ingredients, and prepared with more care than healthy menu items printed in machine-style fonts. (2019-02-21)

Managing chronic pain with light
Scientists from EMBL Rome have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted cells retract from the skin's surface, leading to pain relief. (2018-04-24)

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfaces
Walls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller. (2018-04-23)

The mystery of touch and how we feel about it
The mechanism of tactile sensation has not yet been solved though it is the basic sense of humans. NITech scientists investigated its mechanism and found the important cues in touch could be different for each person. When humans evaluate the roughness, different individuals weigh skin vibration information, spatial information, and other mechanical properties differently. The goal is to establish an estimation model of perceptual roughness ratings involving individual differences in the cognitive weights. (2019-03-29)

A brain-system that builds confidence in what we see, hear and touch
A series of experiments at EPFL provide conclusive evidence that the brain uses a single mechanism (supramodality) to estimate confidence in different senses such as audition, touch, or vision. The study is published in the Journal of Neuroscience. (2017-09-25)

Neuroscientists map brain's response to cold touch
Carnegie Mellon neuroscientists have mapped the feeling of cool touch to the brain's insula in a mouse model. The findings provide an experimental model that will advance research into conditions like pain and hypersensitivity to cold and help researchers to continue to unravel the multifaceted ways touch is represented in the brain. (2018-06-18)

Mathematicians model heat flow in human tears
Mathematicians from the University of Delaware have created a new model of the fluid dynamics and heat flow in human tears. (2012-06-05)

Pressing a button is more challenging than appears
Pressing a button appears easy, but the brain needs a probabilistic internal model to control a press. A new theory exposes significant improvements to button design that help gamers and musicians. (2018-03-20)

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