Popular Transistors News and Current Events

Popular Transistors News and Current Events, Transistors News Articles.
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Engineering material magic
University of Utah engineers have discovered a new kind of 2-D semiconducting material for electronics that opens the door for much speedier computers and smartphones that also consume a lot less power. (2016-02-15)

Yale-NUS scientist and collaborators solve open theoretical problem on electron interactions
New discovery published in Science explains what happens during the phase transition in Dirac materials, paving the way for engineering advanced electronics that perform significantly faster. (2018-08-09)

Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets -- an alternative to graphene
Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors. (2017-03-08)

Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices. (2017-03-30)

A major step forward in organic electronics
Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics. (2018-01-11)

Good vibrations for the future of computing
A vibration-driven logic gate could form the basis for the next generation of efficient, low-power computers. (2017-10-03)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors
A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient environment. (2018-01-12)

New technology standard could shape the future of electronics design
Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics. (2018-01-24)

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level. It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add 'smart,' wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects -- like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals -- that curve, bend, stretch and move. (2017-09-28)

'Nanonet' circuits closer to making flexible electronics reality
Researchers have overcome a major obstacle in producing transistors from networks of carbon nanotubes, a technology that could make it possible to print circuits on plastic sheets for applications including flexible displays and an electronic skin to cover an entire aircraft to monitor crack formation. (2008-07-23)

Electronically-smooth '3-D graphene': A bright future for trisodium bismuthide
Researchers have found that the topological material trisodium bismuthide (Na3Bi) can be manufactured to be as 'electronically smooth' as the highest-quality graphene-based alternative, while maintaining graphene's high electron mobility. (2017-12-22)

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closer
Flexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor created by researchers at The University of Manchester and Shandong University in China. (2018-04-18)

2-D Electronics' metal or semiconductor? Both
IBS researchers produced the first 2-D field-effect transistor (FET) made of a single material. (2017-09-18)

Researchers illuminate the path to a new era of microelectronics
A new microchip technology capable of optically transferring data could solve a severe bottleneck in current devices by speeding data transfer and reducing energy consumption by orders of magnitude, according to an article published in the April 19, 2018 issue of Nature. (2018-04-20)

Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in carbon nanotube interconnects
This paper presents reduction of crosstalk and noise in CNT bundle interconnects. We propose the use of small diameter semiconducting CNTs as electromagnetic interference shields for CNT bundle interconnects. (2017-11-17)

Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes
In mobiles, fridges, planes - transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents. (2019-03-21)

Carbon nanotubes self-assemble into tiny transistors
Carbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, but they are difficult to handle. University of Groningen scientists, together with colleagues from the University of Wuppertal and IBM Zurich, have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes. The results were published in the journal Advanced Materials on April 5. (2017-04-05)

Stretchable silicon could be next wave in electronics
The next wave in electronics could be wavy electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a fully stretchable form of single-crystal silicon with micron-sized, wave-like geometries that can be used to build high-performance electronic devices on rubber substrates. (2005-12-15)

Novel advancements in radiation tolerance of HEMTs
When it comes to putting technology in space, size and mass are prime considerations. A better understanding of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs could mean huge advancements in solid state science, specifically space exploration. (2016-07-12)

NUS scientists unravel new insights into promising semiconductor material
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have established new findings on the properties of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide, a widely studied semiconductor of the future. (2017-09-08)

Researchers report advances in stretchable semiconductors, integrated electronics
Researchers from the University of Houston have reported significant advances in stretchable electronics, moving the field closer to commercialization. (2019-02-01)

Magnetoelectric memory cell increases energy efficiency for data storage
A team of researchers has now developed a magnetoelectric random access memory (MELRAM) cell that has the potential to increase power efficiency, and thereby decrease heat waste, by orders of magnitude for read operations at room temperature. The research could aid production of devices such as instant-on laptops, close-to-zero-consumption flash drives, and data storage centers that require much less air conditioning. The research team reported their findings this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-05-30)

Making the internet of things possible with a new breed of 'memristors'
Easily printable, organic thin films can retain data for more than 10 years without power, work with low voltages -- and become the building block of future computers that mimic the human brain. (2018-01-10)

Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore's Law
Research appearing today in Nature Communications finds useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate 'valleytronics' transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips.  (2018-05-01)

Illinois researchers develop heat switch for electronics
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. The findings were published in the article 'Millimeter-scale liquid metal droplet thermal switch,' which appeared in Applied Physics Letters. (2018-03-08)

UCLA researchers develop a new class of two-dimensional materials
A UCLA research team has developed a new kind of artificial (2018-03-08)

Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices. (2019-01-04)

Making waves for ultrahigh definition displays
Wavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint could drive future flexible displays. (2018-01-16)

Penn engineering research gives optical switches the 'contrast' of electronic transistors
Penn Engineers have taken an important step toward the creation of a working optical transistor: precisely controlling the mixing of optical signals via tailored electric fields, and obtaining outputs with a near perfect contrast and extremely large on/off ratios. (2018-01-31)

Dietary fiber effectively purifies carbon nanotubes
A dietary fiber can help separate out semiconducting carbon nanotubes used for making transistors for flexible electronics. (2019-11-02)

Single molecular insulator pushes boundaries of current state of the art
Researchers have synthesized the first molecule capable of insulating at the nanometer scale more effectively than a vacuum barrier. The team's insight was to exploit the wave nature of electrons. By designing an extremely rigid silicon-based molecule under 1 nm in length that exhibited comprehensive destructive interference signatures, they devised a novel technique for blocking tunnelling conduction. This new design principle has the potential to support continued miniaturization of classic transistors in the near term. (2018-06-06)

Testing, radiation testing: Northwestern transistors on space station
Transistors based on a new kind of material created by Northwestern University researchers have been lifted into outer space on the space shuttle Endeavour and attached to the outside of the International Space Station for radiation testing. The transistors, which used a new kind of gate dielectric material called a self-assembled nanodielectric, will remain there for a year as part of a NASA materials experiment to see how they and other materials hold up to the harsh space environment. (2008-06-10)

Seeing the next dimension of computer chips
Japanese researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope to image the side-surfaces of 3-D silicon crystals for the first time. The pictures, captured with atomic-level of resolution, can help semiconductor manufacturers build the next generation of computer chips with three-dimensional features. (2017-10-10)

Microprocessors based on a layer of just 3 atoms
Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project. (2017-04-11)

Metal wires of carbon complete toolbox for carbon-based computers
Carbon-based computers have the potential to be a lot faster and much more energy efficient than silicon-based computers, but 2D graphene and carbon nanotubes have proved challenging to turn into the elements needed to construct transistor circuits. Graphene nanoribbons can overcome these limitations, but to date scientists have been made only semiconductors and insulators, not the metallic wires to connect them. UC Berkeley scientists have now achieved the goal of a metallic graphene nanoribbon. (2020-09-24)

Waterloo chemists create faster and more efficient way to process information
University of Waterloo chemists have found a much faster and more efficient way to store and process information by expanding the limitations of how the flow of electricity can be used and managed. (2018-05-11)

'Spintronics' could enable a new generation of electronic devices, physicists say
Physicists have discovered the equivalent of a new 'Ohm's Law' for spintronics - the emerging science of manipulating the spin of electrons for useful purposes. Unlike the Ohm's Law for electronics, the new 'Ohm's Law' says that the spin of the electron can be transported without any loss of energy, or dissipation. This effect occurs at room temperature in materials widely used in the semiconductor industry and could enable a new generation of computing devices. (2003-08-08)

A discovery about the behavior of heat in electronic devices can improve their performance
Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), in collaboration with Purdue University (USA), have shown that heat flow behaves similarly to a viscous fluid when studied at nanoscale. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, paves the way to a better thermal management in electronic devices. (2018-01-23)

Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films. (2020-05-07)

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