Popular Transmission News and Current Events

Popular Transmission News and Current Events, Transmission News Articles.
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Coupled proteins
Researchers from Heidelberg University and Sendai University in Japan used new biotechnological methods to study how human cells react to and further process external signals. They focussed on the interaction between so-called G-proteins -- the 'mediators' of signal transmission -- and the receptors known as GPCRs, which trigger signal processes. (2019-07-01)

New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

The math of malaria
A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use. (2018-08-28)

Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defects
A paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission. (2018-03-09)

Study shows suppressing herpes virus may reduce infectiousness of HIV
A recent study of men co-infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and HIV revealed that drugs used to suppress HSV decrease the levels of HIV in the blood and rectal secretions, which may make patients less likely to transmit the virus. This study is published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, now available online. (2007-11-15)

Forest fragmentation disrupts parasite infection in Australian lizards
In a study with implications for biodiversity and the spread of infectious diseases, CU Boulder ecologists have demonstrated that deforestation and habitat fragmentation can decrease transmission of a parasitic nematode in a particular species of Australian lizard, the pale-flecked garden sunskink. (2018-11-29)

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. (2018-06-05)

New tool advances investigations of disease outbreaks
A new field called genomic epidemiology is taking advantage of the rapidly reduced costs of next-generation DNA sequencing to better inform public health officials faced with ongoing outbreaks. (2014-04-15)

Study examines risk of HIV transmission from condomless sex with virologically suppressed HIV infection
Among nearly 900 serodifferent (one partner is HIV-positive, one is HIV-negative) heterosexual and men who have sex with men couples in which the HIV-positive partner was using suppressive antiretroviral therapy and who reported condomless sex, during a median follow-up of 1.3 years per couple, there were no documented cases of within-couple HIV transmission, according to a study appearing in the July 12 issue of JAMA, an HIV/AIDS theme issue. (2016-07-12)

An optical brain-to-brain interface supports information exchange for locomotion control
Chinese researchers established an optical BtBI that supports rapid information transmission for precise locomotion control, thus providing a proof-of-principle demonstration of fast BtBI for real-time behavioral control. (2020-05-07)

Patients diagnosed late with HIV infection are more likely to transmit HIV to others
An estimated 1.2 million people live with HIV in the United States, with nearly 13 percent being unaware of their infection. New research by Brandon Brown in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside and colleagues has found that patients diagnosed late in the course of HIV infection are more likely to transmit HIV to others. Further, these patients are at an increased risk of negative health outcomes and opportunistic infections. (2016-10-06)

Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases
A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr. Kelly Austin, finds a link between deforestation and increasing malaria rates across developing nations. (2017-05-22)

Launch of 'DeWorm3' collection
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is happy to announce the publication of a new collection, 'DeWorm3' on Jan. 18, 2018. (2018-01-18)

University of Waterloo develops new way to fight HIV transmission
Scientists at the University of Waterloo have developed a new tool to protect women from HIV infection. (2018-04-16)

CSU team uncovers potential for Rift Valley fever virus transmission in Colorado livestock
Colorado State University researchers found that mosquitoes that could transmit the virus were abundant in feedlots and at nearby sites in Northern Colorado. (2019-08-12)

Pandemic likely to cause long-term health problems, Yale School of Public Health finds
The coronavirus pandemic's life-altering effects are likely to result in lasting physical and mental health consequences for many people--particularly those from vulnerable populations--a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. (2020-05-20)

Genome sleuthing tracks the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
esearchers tracked the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during a one-year period in the East of England, and observed evidence for transmission of the bacteria in the community resulting from clinically unrecognized episodes. (2017-10-25)

First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry. (2020-09-29)

Family connections feed eating disorders research
For the millions of Americans who experience eating disorders, new research published in the March 2000 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry provides increased understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and offers a greater awareness of the family and hereditary links of the disorders. (2000-02-22)

Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time
A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. (2017-11-17)

Technologies for the Sixth Generation Cellular Network
Future wireless data networks will have to reach higher transmission rates and shorter delays, while supplying an increasing number of end devices. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use ultra-rapid electro-optical modulators to convert terahertz data signals into optical signals. This is reported in Nature Photonics. (2019-07-25)

Army scientists revolutionize cybersecurity through quantum research
Army scientists have found a novel way to safeguard quantum information during transmission. This finding has the potential to lead to more secure and reliable communication for warfighters on the battlefield. (2018-11-21)

IBM reveals novel energy-saving optical receiver with a new record of rapid power-on/off time
Group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project 'ADDAPT,' have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. (2018-02-22)

NIH scientists explore tick salivary glands as tool to study virus transmission, infection
The salivary glands of some tick species could become important research tools for studying how viruses are transmitted from ticks to mammals, and for developing preventive medical countermeasures. Tick salivary glands usually block transmission, but a new study conducted at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH focuses on the role of salivary glands in spreading flaviviruses from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) to mammals. The new study appears in the journal mBio. (2019-01-29)

New insights on mosquitoes that spread disease
The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is a highly invasive species and a vector of multiple pathogens including various viruses, such as chikungunya, dengue, and Zika. A new Medical and Veterinary Entomology study that evaluated the relationship between the mosquito's presence and habitat variables at a small scale provides important information for planning effective prevention and control campaigns. (2018-07-09)

Cytoplasmic streaming is involved in the transmission of signals within giant cells in Chara algae
Chara algae are ancient plant organisms that are commonly found in freshwater reservoirs and occur, though more rarely, in water bodies with salt water. An unusual feature of this type of algae is the huge size of individual cells, which can reach up to 1 mm in diameter and up to several centimeters in length. (2018-04-13)

Illinois researchers develop new surface design inspired by snake skin
Seok Kim, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and graduate students Zining Yang and Jun Kyu Park have developed a design construct inspired in part by the surface of butterflies and snakes, where flexible skins are fully covered by rigid, discrete scales. (2018-02-02)

Considering cattle could help eliminate malaria in India
The goal of eliminating malaria in countries like India could be more achievable if mosquito-control efforts take into account the relationship between mosquitoes and cattle, according to an international team of researchers. (2017-01-16)

Severe human infection with a novel avian-origin influenza A(H7N4) virus
Avian influenza virus (AIV) is always the threat to human due to its pandemic potential. Herein, a novel reassortant AIV, influenza A(H7N4) virus, has been identified. The virus originated from wild bird AIVs, infected backyard chickens and ducks, and cause a severe human infection. Researchers firstly conducted a comprehensive investigation on this case, confirming the viral infection and the transmission route. Early identification and response interrupted the spread of this novel virus. (2018-08-31)

70Gb/s optical intra-connects in data centers based on band-limited devices
High-speed and low-cost data center optical intra-connects have been developed quickly. New research shows that a 70Gb/s optical interconnect based on 18GHz band-limited VCSEL has been experimentally demonstrated. (2017-12-01)

Risk of international spread of yellow fever re-assessed in light of the ongoing outbreaks
ECDC has updated its rapid risk assessment on the outbreak of yellow fever with the latest developments, more comprehensive information on the current situation in Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Uganda and an extended threat assessment for the EU. Some of the data used in the assessment were collected during a mission to Angola in May 2016. (2016-05-31)

A mass dog vaccination campaign stops rabies transmission in its tracks
Mass dog vaccination campaigns in an African city successfully interrupted rabies transmission for nine months during 2014, researchers report. (2017-12-20)

More brain activity is not always better when it comes to memory and attention
Potential new ways of understanding the cause of cognitive impairments, such as problems with memory and attention, in brain disorders including schizophrenia and Alzheimer's are under the spotlight in a new research review. (2017-06-15)

Viral genome sequencing in the heart of a Lassa outbreak
The first researchers to deploy a mobile nanopore sequencing technology to evaluate viral genomics at the height of a Lassa virus outbreak in 2018 now report their results. (2019-01-03)

The future of wireless communications is terahertz
Electrical and optical engineers in Australia have designed a novel platform that could tailor telecommunication and optical transmissions. They experimentally demonstrated their system using a new transmission wavelength with a higher bandwidth capacity than those currently used in wireless communication. Reported this week in APL Photonics, these experiments open up new horizons in communication and photonics technology. (2018-02-06)

Anti-virus protein in humans may resist transmission of HIV-1 precursor from chimps
In humans, an anti-virus protein known as APOBEC3H may defend against cross-species transmission from chimpanzees of the virus that gave rise to HIV-1. Zeli Zhang of Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Germany, and colleagues present this finding in a new PLOS Pathogens study. (2017-12-21)

Smelling the risk of infection
Humans and monkeys are social beings and benefit from a community. But the closeness to conspecifics is an opportunity for parasites to infect new hosts. Clémence Poirotte from the German Primate Center investigated how mandrills recognize conspecifics infected with intestinal parasites. The monkeys are able to smell an infected group member and groom them less than healthy individuals. This component of the 'behavioral immune system' plays a crucial role in the co-evolution of host and parasite. (2017-04-10)

New model links yellow fever in Africa to climate, environment
The burden of yellow fever in any given area is known to be heavily dependent on climate, particularly rainfall and temperature which can impact both mosquito life cycle and viral replication. Now, researchers from Imperial College London and the World Health Organization (WHO) have developed a new model to quantify yellow fever dynamics across Africa using not only annual averages of these climatic measures, but seasonal dynamics. Their work is described in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (2018-03-15)

How the Zika virus can spread
The spread of infectious diseases such as Zika depends on many different factors. Researchers from Goethe University and the Senckenberg Society for Nature Research in Frankfurt were able to generate reliable maps for the transmission risk of the Zika virus in South America. (2019-11-11)

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