Popular Tropical Forests News and Current Events

Popular Tropical Forests News and Current Events, Tropical Forests News Articles.
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Alligators on the beach? Killer whales in rivers? Get used to it
Sightings of alligators and other large predators in places where conventional wisdom says they 'shouldn't be' have increased in recent years, in large part because local populations, once hunted to near-extinction, are rebounding. A new Duke-led paper finds that far from being outliers, these sightings signify the return of highly adaptable predators to prime hunting grounds they occupied long ago -- a trend that opens new opportunities for future conservation. (2018-05-07)

Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. It's a mechanism that could potentially be exploited as the world tries to shift its carbon economy. (2019-01-02)

Climate impacts drive east-west divide in forest seed production
Younger, smaller trees that comprise much of North America's eastern forests have increased their seed production under climate change. But older, larger trees that dominate western forests have been less responsive, a Duke-led study warns. This continental divide could limit western forests' ability to regenerate following large-scale diebacks linked to rising temperatures and intensifying droughts. Over time this might dramatically alter the composition and structure of 21st century North American forests. (2021-02-23)

Parents unknown
Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention. We don't know what their role is in the environment. In fact, we don't even know they exist. New research may double the number of species of a little-known marine creature, based on DNA studies of its larvae. (2019-05-13)

Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. These causes, which vary by location and over time, include the conversion of forests to grasslands by El Niño-fueled wildfires; small-scale farming; and mining. Policymakers and conservationists need to address these varied causes when devising new programs and practices. (2019-02-01)

New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

The black forest and climate change
Silver and Douglas firs could replace Norway spruce in the long run due to their greater resistance to droughts. (2017-06-30)

Insect evolution: Insect evolution
Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that the incidence of midge and fly larvae in amber is far higher than previously thought. The new finds shed light on insect evolution and the ecology in the Baltic amber forest during the Eocene epoch. (2019-10-25)

NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Depression Bolaven as it moved toward Vietnam. Bolaven's final warning was issued early today, Jan. 4. (2018-01-04)

Older forests resist change -- climate change, that is
Older forests in eastern North America are less vulnerable to climate change than younger forests, particularly for carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity, new research finds. The study, to be published in Global Change Biology's June 12, 2019 edition, analyzed how climate change is expected to impact forests across the eastern US and Canada. It found that increased forest age reduces the climate sensitivity of forest carbon, timber, and biodiversity to projected increases in temperature and precipitation. (2019-06-07)

NASA spies wind shear still affecting Tropical Storm Nalgae
Tropical Storm Nalgae can't seem to get a break from vertical wind shear. The storm has been dealing with wind shear since it formed and NASA's Terra satellite observed that was still the case on Aug. 4. (2017-08-04)

Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. (2017-12-28)

NASA satellite sees a more powerful Hurricane Rina, warnings up in Mexico
Hurricane warnings are in effect in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and visible and infrared satellite imagery from NASA continues to show Hurricane Rina getting stronger. Rina is now a category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale. (2011-10-25)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail
Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge 'tail' on NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the northwestern Pacific Ocean storm that revealed a large band of thunderstorms that resemble a large tail. The NASA imagery also indicated that the storm is getting better organized. (2019-09-20)

Tropical Depression 11E 'born' with wind shear on satellite imagery
The eleventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season came together on August 4 even though it was being affected by vertical wind shear. (2017-08-04)

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate. (2019-03-27)

SF State study finds US Forest Service lands underused by minorities
A new study by San Francisco State University and the US Forest Service finds that Forest Service lands are underused by minorities. The study recommends that public agencies improve their outreach to and hiring of minorities. (2018-05-31)

NASA-NOAA satellite provides forecasters a view of tropical storm Jerry's structure
Tropical Storm Jerry is the latest in a line of tropical cyclones to develop in the North Atlantic Ocean this season. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and provided forecasters with a view of its structure that helped confirm it was organizing. (2019-09-18)

Forest fragmentation disrupts parasite infection in Australian lizards
In a study with implications for biodiversity and the spread of infectious diseases, CU Boulder ecologists have demonstrated that deforestation and habitat fragmentation can decrease transmission of a parasitic nematode in a particular species of Australian lizard, the pale-flecked garden sunskink. (2018-11-29)

NASA eyes a comma-shaped Tropical Storm Rina
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Rina and found that the storm has taken on a tight comma-cloud appearance. (2017-11-08)

Wind and water
Damaging rains from hurricanes can be more intense after winds begin to subside, say UC Santa Barbara scientists. (2019-12-05)

Floor of oldest forest discovered in Schoharie County
Scientists from Binghamton University and Cardiff University, and New York State Museum researchers, and have reported the discovery of the floor of the world's oldest forest in a cover article in the March 1 issue of Nature, a leading international journal of science. (2012-02-29)

NASA looks at rainfall in developing Tropical Storm Kai-tak
Tropical Storm Kai-tak developed near the east central Philippines as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall. (2017-12-14)

NASA finds one burst of energy in weakening Depression Dalila
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite found just a small area of cold clouds in thunderstorms within weakening Tropical Depression Dalila, enough to maintain it as a tropical cyclone. (2019-07-25)

NASA's IMERG measures Tropical Cyclone Ava's disastrous rainfall
Tropical cyclone Ava dropped extremely heavy rainfall over Madagascar as it passed over the eastern side of the island country on Jan. 5 and 6, 2018. NASA calculated how much rainfall occurred using satellite data. (2018-01-10)

The critical importance of mangroves to ocean life
Mangrove plants, whose finger-like roots are known to protect coastal wetlands against the ocean and as important fish habitats, cover less than 0.1 percent of the global land surface yet account for a tenth of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that flows from land to the ocean. The plants are one of the main sources of dissolved organic matter in the ocean. (2006-02-27)

NASA sees second Tropical soaking in Southern Philippines
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Philippines and infrared imagery showed that Tropical Storm Tembin contained strong thunderstorms with heavy rainmaking potential as it moved across Mindanao in the southern part of the country. The southern Philippines recently experienced a soaking from what is now Tropical Depression Kai-Tak. (2017-12-22)

Natural solutions reduce global warming: Clark University + The Nature Conservancy
Christopher A. Williams, associate professor in Clark University's Graduate School of Geography and postdoctoral research scientist Huan Gu, Ph.D., worked with The Nature Conservancy and close to two dozen institutional partners on 'Natural Climate Solutions for the United States,' published today in Science Advances. The new study highlights natural solutions in the United States that offer the most promise to help limit warming to 1.5 degrees Centigrade (approximately 3 degrees Fahrenheit). (2018-11-14)

Study: To prevent collapse of tropical forests, protect their shape
Scientists have made a fundamental discovery about how fires on the edges of tropical forests control their shape and stability. The study implies that when patches of tropical forest lose their natural shape it could contribute to the catastrophic transformation of that land from trees to grass. (2018-03-30)

NASA tracks a weaker comma-shaped Tropical Cyclone Marcus
Tropical Cyclone Marcus continues to parallel Western Australia and remain far from the coast, while weakening. NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed the storm in infrared light and saw a comma-shaped Marcus. (2018-03-23)

Land restoration in Latin America shows big potential for climate change mitigation
Land restoration in Latin America and the Caribbean is picking up pace and scaling up projects will help the region meet its pledges under the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2030. A new study supplies a first map of restoration projects in Latin America and shows their potential to mitigate climate change through restoring forests. (2019-09-13)

NASA sees Hurricane Jose off the US east coast
Hurricane Jose producing dangerous surf and rip currents along the east Coast of the United States. Satellite imagery shows Jose is now close enough to the coast to also trigger a tropical storm warnings and watches. (2017-09-18)

NASA gets 'eyed' by major Hurricane Jose
NASA's Aqua satellite captured clear view of the eye of Hurricane Jose at it moved toward the Leeward Islands and strengthened into a Category 4 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Aqua also analyzed the storm in infrared light showing powerful storms around the center, capable of heavy rainfall. (2017-09-08)

Climate change and habitat conversion combine to homogenize nature
Climate change and habitat conversion to agriculture are working together to homogenize nature, indicates a study in the journal Global Change Biology led by the University of California, Davis. In other words, the more things change, the more they are the same. (2017-08-18)

Expanding tropical forest spells disaster for conservation
A North Carolina State University study shows that fire suppression efforts in Brazilian savannas turn many of those areas into forest lands, with negative consequences for the plants and animals that live there. (2017-08-30)

Biodiversity loss in forests will be pricey
A new global assessment of forests -- perhaps the largest terrestrial repositories of biodiversity -- suggests that, on average, a 10 percent loss in biodiversity leads to a 2 to 3 percent loss in the productivity, including biomass, that forests can offer. (2016-10-13)

Tropical Depression 1E dissipates
Tropical Depression 1E or TD1E didn't get far from the time it was born to the time it weakened to a remnant low pressure area along the southwestern coast of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of it remnant clouds. (2016-06-08)

UTEP team advances in developing vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis
A research team at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis. During the team's more than four years of research at UTEP's Border Biomedical Research Center, they discovered a vaccine formulation that resulted in a 96 percent decrease in the lesions caused by the illness and showed an 86 percent protection rate from the disease in mice. (2017-11-15)

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