Popular Trust News and Current Events

Popular Trust News and Current Events, Trust News Articles.
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Let's clear the air
New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, in partnership with the Kingsley Association and funded by the Heinz Endowments examined the impact that bottom-up, community-level initiatives have in addressing environmental justice issues. They found that the best way to address a community's environmental injustices is to meet them where they are, integrating into the community and building trust over a long-term partnership. (2019-05-29)

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

People with autism are less surprised by the unexpected
Adults with autism may overestimate the volatility of the world around them, finds a new UCL study published in Nature Neuroscience. (2017-07-31)

Womb natural killer cell discovery could lead to screening for miscarriage risk
For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified. Researchers at the University of Warwick and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) NHS Trust have discovered the role that they play in preparing the womb for pregnancy. (2017-12-14)

Social, public health services crucial in fight against HIV/AIDS
Patients at risk for HIV need to be linked to services -- such as mental health and syringe exchange programs -- that will help them stay in care, adhere to medication and avoid reinfection, a new University of Michigan study suggests. (2018-03-19)

Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them to share PHI for research purposes. (2021-01-12)

UK chalk-stream salmon genetically unique
Salmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique, researchers have discovered. (2018-01-30)

'European Muslims perceive the EU more positively than other Europeans'
For the first time, the Cluster of Excellence analyses the attitudes of European Muslims towards the EU - Far less sceptical than other groups such as Christians and those without religious affiliation - Reason probably lies with their relatively higher life satisfaction in their host country - Religiosity does not seem to influence the attitudes of Muslims towards the EU - Experiencing discrimination however threatens positive attitudes. (2017-10-27)

Patients react better when doctors imply uncertainty, rather than state it directly
Choice of words might matter when doctors communicate uncertainty of diagnosis to their patients. A paper published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care shows that the parents of pediatric patients may react more negatively to doctors who communicate uncertainty of diagnosis explicitly, such as directly stating they are unsure, as compared to doctors who use implicit language, such as discussing 'most likely' diagnosis or providing several possible diagnoses under consideration. (2018-01-10)

Blood test could quickly predict if the drug palbociclib will help breast cancer patients
A new study has found a blood test for cancer DNA could predict if a woman is responding to the breast cancer drug palbociclib, months earlier than current tests. Scientists from The Institute of Cancer Research, London, say the test could detect in two to three weeks whether the drug is working, although they caution the results need replicating before they are used clinically. The research was funded by the Medical Research Council. (2018-03-01)

Political corruption scars young voters forever, new research finds
New research by Bocconi University, Milan, finds that political corruption has a long-term scarring effect on trust in democratic institutions and on voters' behavior and that such an effect differs according to one's age cohort, with first-time voters at the time of corruption revelation still being affected 25 years later. (2019-02-22)

Individuals' perceptions on immigration and political trust may have shaped the Brexit vote
A few weeks prior to the EU Referendum in the UK, researchers surveyed 1,000 residents of Kent in the south east of England (where a majority intended to vote to leave), and 1,000 across Scotland (where a majority intended to vote to remain). The findings are published in the British Journal of Social Psychology. (2018-01-10)

Great Ape Trust graduate student's paper sheds light on bonobo language
What happens when linguistic tools used to analyze human language are applied to a conversation between a language-competent bonobo and a human? The findings, published this month in the Journal of Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science, indicate that bonobos may exhibit larger linguistic competency in ordinary conversation than in controlled experimental settings. (2008-08-28)

Baylor study: Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagement
Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business. (2017-12-14)

Researchers suggest empathy be a factor in medical school admissions
The national norms can help to distinguish between two applicants with similar academic qualifications, and identify students who might need additional educational remedies to bolster their level of empathy. Research indicates that physicians with higher levels of empathy demonstrate greater clinical competence and deliver better patient outcomes than less empathetic doctors. (2019-07-25)

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program success
Research published in PLOS ONE shows that private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land. (2018-04-04)

Crowded urban areas have fewer songbirds per person
People in crowded urban areas -- especially poor areas -- see fewer songbirds such as tits and finches, and more potential 'nuisance' birds, such as pigeons, magpies and gulls, new research shows. (2018-04-13)

Instagram micro-celebrities
Physical attractiveness, high-quality photos, interesting content, engagement with the audience, and subject competence are the key contributing factors to Instagram micro-celebrities' success, according to a study which examines the influence of online celebrity endorsers on consumer purchase intentions. The research was conducted by Oxana Trofimenko from HSE University jointly with Elmira Djafarova of Newcastle Business School. (2018-04-18)

Should women consume alcohol during pregnancy?
In The BMJ this week, experts discuss the evidence and current guidelines on the controversial topic of alcohol consumption during pregnancy. (2015-10-06)

How does the brain's spatial map change when we change the shape of the room?
A new study, published today in Science, explores the consequences of distorting the shape of the enclosing box on cognitive maps of space. The results detail how our cognitive maps adapt to changed environments and shed light on how distinct types of neurons may connect to form these maps. (2018-03-08)

A Georgia State cybersecurity study of the dark web exposes vulnerability to machine identities
A thriving marketplace for SSL and TLS certificates -- small data files used to facilitate confidential communication between organizations' servers and their clients' computers -- exists on a hidden part of the Internet, according to new research by Georgia State University's Evidence-Based Cybersecurity Research Group (EBCS) and the University of Surrey. (2019-03-08)

Parent-child bond predicts depression, anxiety in teens attending high-achieving schools
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have found the quality of the parent-child relationship steadily declined starting in grade 6, and levels of alienation, trust and communication in middle school predicted depressive symptoms and anxiety in grade 12. (2018-10-25)

Do differences in anatomy matter for achieving orgasm?
A recent review of the medical literature reveals that differences in anatomy may help explain why some individuals experience orgasms more successfully than others. (2016-04-07)

Study unravels the genetics of childhood 'overgrowth'
Researchers have undertaken the world's largest genetic study of childhood overgrowth syndromes -- providing new insights into their causes, and new recommendations for genetic testing. (2017-05-04)

Poor neighborhoods' influence on parents may raise preschool children's risk of problems
New research that examined the influence of poor neighborhoods on parents has linked parental factors to increased risk of verbal and behavioral problems in children. Living in poor neighborhoods was associated with poorer mental health in parents, poorer family relations, and less consistent and more punitive parenting. The study also found less neighborhood cohesion or mutual trust in poor neighborhoods, which were often associated in turn with parenting styles related to behavior problems in children. (2008-02-07)

Empowering workers can cause uncertainty and resentment
Attempts by managers to empower staff by delegating different work to them or asking for their opinions can be detrimental for employee productivity, research shows. (2017-11-29)

How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees
Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-03-18)

How parenting styles influence our attitudes to marriage
Research from Japan has revealed how different parenting styles can affect marriage rates and desired number of children. (2017-02-02)

Immunotherapy treatment option for selected breast cancer patients, genetic study suggests
Immunotherapy drugs could help some breast cancer patients based on the genetic changes in their tumors, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators find. Published today in Cancer Research, scientists identify particular genetic changes in a DNA repair mechanism in breast cancer. The results open up the possibility to another therapy option for around 1,000 breast cancer patients in the UK, who could benefit from existing drugs. (2017-09-13)

'Sleeping' stem cells could aid brain repair
Scientists at the Wellcome Trust/ Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, have identified a new type of stem cell in the brain which they say has a high potential for repair following brain injury or disease. (2018-04-05)

Nerve study shows how cells adapt to help repair damage
Genetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists. (2017-10-05)

Safeguarding children when sentencing mothers
Oxford University have collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment. It is estimated that 17,000 children every year are affected by maternal imprisonment in England and Wales. (2018-01-30)

Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in Cameroon
Both the etiology and demographics of podoconiosis, a non-infectious disease which causes massive swelling of the legs, are poorly understood. To help contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis knowledge, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now described the distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon. (2018-01-11)

How emancipation contributes to trust in strangers
In many countries, human empowerment -- including freedom of expression and action -- tends to increase people's generalised trust in other people, particularly strangers. However, such an increase is usually gradual, reaching its peak in affluent, modernised democracies. In contrast, in countries with below-average levels of development, people, especially educated ones, often demonstrate a lack of trust in strangers, according to researchers of the Higher School of Economics. (2017-11-20)

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests. (2018-01-10)

Inflammatory response to infection and injury may worsen dementia
Inflammation in the brain resulting from infection or injury may accelerate the progress of dementia, research funded by the Wellcome Trust suggests. The findings, published this week in the journal Biological Psychiatry, may have implications for the treatment and care of those living with dementia. (2008-09-16)

Mindfulness training may help support weight loss
Mindfulness training may improve the effectiveness of intensive weight management programs, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2018-12-18)

No publication bias found in climate change research
Rarely do we encounter a scientific fact that stirs public controversy and distrust in science as much as climate change. However, the theory is built on honest reporting of facts. This emerges from a new study from Lund University in Sweden. (2017-03-15)

Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews
Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer's general tendency to trust others. (2017-12-11)

How companies can restore trust after CEO misconduct
A new study published today in the Journal of Trust Research reveals how boards of directors can proactively address CEO misconduct to increase public trust towards an organization. (2018-02-19)

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