Popular Tumor News and Current Events

Popular Tumor News and Current Events, Tumor News Articles.
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Sound waves could provide 'liquid biopsies'
Using sound waves, researchers have developed a gentle, contact-free method for separating circulating tumor cells from blood samples that is fast and efficient enough for clinical use. The ability to quickly and efficiently harvest and grow these cells from a blood sample would enable 'liquid biopsies' capable of providing individualized diagnosis, prognosis and suggestions for treatment strategies. (2018-07-03)

Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. (2018-01-31)

Leading cancer research organizations to host international cancer immunotherapy conference
The Cancer Research Institute, the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy, the European Academy of Tumor Immunology, and the American Association for Cancer Research will join forces to sponsor the first International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel in New York, Sept. 16-19, 2015. (2015-08-03)

UC San Diego cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types
A dysfunctional enzyme involved in building cancer cell membranes helps fuel tumor growth; when it's disabled or depleted in mouse models, tumors shrank significantly. (2019-07-11)

Professional surfer back in the water after successful surgery to treat rare bone cancer
When professional surfer Richie Lovett began experiencing hip pain at 31, he attributed it to his athletic lifestyle. But after months of discomfort and preliminary tests, the Australian native learned the pain was caused by a cancerous tumor in his femur or thigh bone. (2014-05-13)

UH Cancer Center researcher finds new driver of an aggressive form of brain cancer
University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers have identified an essential driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer that can occur at any age. The discovery can help researchers create novel targeted therapies potentially reducing deaths from this devastating cancer. (2016-11-14)

Enhanced glow
Tumor cells circulating in blood are markers for the early detection and prognosis of cancer. However, detection of these cells is challenging because of their scarcity. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced an ultrasensitive method for the direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples. It is based on the amplified, time-resolved fluorescence measurement of luminescent lanthanide ions released from nanoparticles that bind specifically to tumor cells. (2019-08-07)

UCI researchers uncover cancer cell vulnerabilities; may lead to better cancer therapies
A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals a protein responsible for genetic changes resulting in a variety of cancers, may also be the key to more effective, targeted cancer therapy. (2020-06-12)

Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon
Patients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports. (2018-02-12)

For patients with esophageal cancer, status of lymph nodes after preoperative therapy determines survival
The status of lymph nodes rather than the status of the primary tumor following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy is the most important factor that determines whether patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer will survive. The study presented at the AATS 98th Annual Meeting indicates that while preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy improve survival of patients with esophageal cancer, patients with malignant lymph nodes following therapy were less likely to survive than patients with no cancer in the lymph nodes. (2018-05-01)

Engineering a better device to capture -- and release -- circulating tumor cells
Yaling Liu, of Lehigh University, has created an innovative microfluidic device that uses magnetic particles and wavy-herringbone design to capture and release circulating tumor cells with an 80-95% capture efficiency rate at different tumor cell concentrations. Liu will present some of his findings today, April 18th, at a conference taking place in Istanbul, Turkey called The Future of Medicine hosted by Royal Academy of Science International Trust (RASIT) and Bahçe?ehir University. (2018-04-18)

Anti-tumor and Immune-potentiating Enterococcus faecalis-2001 β-glucans
Background: Enterococcus faecalis 2001 is a probiotic lactic acid bacterium and has been used as a biological response modifier (BRM). From physiological limitation of bacterial preservation in storage and safety, the live E. faecalis 2001 has been heat-treated and the BRM components containing high level of β-glucan, named EF-2001, were prepared. (2017-11-17)

First use of graphene to detect cancer cells
By interfacing brain cells onto graphene, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown they can differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell, pointing the way to developing a simple, noninvasive tool for early cancer diagnosis. (2016-12-19)

MD Anderson study confirms protein as potential cause of most common type of pancreatic cancer
An oncogene, UPS21, has been confirmed as a frequently amplified gene in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the most common and often lethal form of pancreatic cancer. The discovery could lead to new treatment options. (2019-09-04)

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify one way T cell function may fail in cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells. (2019-04-04)

Novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells
A novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. (2018-05-01)

Jumbled chromosomes may dampen the immune response to tumors
How well a tumor responds to immunotherapy may depend in part on whether its chromosomes are intact or in a state of disarray, a new study reports. The finding could help doctors better pinpoint which cancer patients would benefit from immunotherapy. (2017-01-19)

Huntsman Cancer Institute research holds promise for personalized lung cancer treatments
New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah uncovered distinct types of tumors within small cell lung cancer that look and act differently from one another. Scientists also identified a targeted drug combination that worked well with one specific tumor type. The study was published today in Cancer Cell. The findings suggest small cell lung cancer should not be treated as a uniform disease. (2017-01-12)

ECOG-ACRIN discovers a simple blood test may predict recurrence of breast cancer
Late recurrence five+ years after surgery accounts for at least half of all breast cancer recurrences. There are no tests that identify who is at highest risk. ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group researchers studied a blood test for circulating tumor cells, finding that in women cancer-free five after diagnosis, 5% had a positive test, which was associated with a 35% recurrence risk after two years, compared with only 2% with a negative test. Findings require follow-up. (2017-12-08)

Nanoparticles deliver anticancer cluster bombs
Scientists have devised a triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system for delivering the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, via tiny nanoparticles designed to break up when they reach a tumor. (2016-03-29)

HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop
Chinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS). (2017-11-10)

Novel genomics tool enables more accurate identification of rare mutations in cancer cells
A new computational method developed by researchers at the New York Genome Center (NYGC) allows scientists to identify rare gene mutations in cancer cells with greater accuracy and sensitivity than currently available approaches. The technique, reported in today's Communications Biology from Nature Research publishing, is called Lancet and represents a major advance in the identification of tumor cell mutations, a process known as somatic variant calling. (2018-03-22)

Tumor-killing virus selectively targets diseased brain cells
New findings show that a specialized virus with the ability to reproduce its tumor-killing genes can selectively target tumors in the brains of mice and eliminate them. Healthy brain tissue remained virtually untouched, according to a Feb. 20 report in the Journal of Neuroscience. With more research, the technique could one day offer a novel way of treating brain cancer in humans. (2008-02-19)

Tests with topical treatment strategy for fighting skin cancer yield positive results
The methodology developed in Brazil combines low-intensity electric current with a formulation containing nanoencapsulated chemotherapy. According to preliminary results of the study, cancer-induced mice treated with this new approach presented a significantly greater reduction in the size of the tumor than those that received it through injection. (2017-10-06)

Siamab Therapeutics announces publication of new data on its ST1 lead program in the journal Oncotarget
Siamab Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing novel glycan-targeted cancer therapeutics, today announced the publication of new preclinical data. (2018-05-01)

Tumor-targeting viral therapy slows neuroblastoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors
Researchers in a multi-institutional study led by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center slowed the growth of two particularly stubborn solid tumor cancers -- neuroblastoma and peripheral nerve sheath tumors -- without harming healthy tissues by inserting instructions to inhibit tissue growth into an engineered virus, according to study results published in the Feb. 15 Cancer Research. (2008-02-15)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

Cryoablation continues to show good results for kidney cancer patients
A review of 62 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent cryoablation to treat cancerous kidney tumors shows that the patients are cancer free for up to two and a half years after having had the procedure. (2007-11-25)

How bone cells promote lung cancer growth
A certain type of cell in the bone marrow can help promote tumor growth in mice with early stage lung cancer, a new study finds. (2017-11-30)

Moffitt researchers discover new approach to stimulate an immune response against tumor cells
A team of Moffitt Cancer Center researchers is trying to find new ways to further enhance the activity of the immune system against cancer. In an article published in the January issue of Cancer Cell, the researchers describe how a new type of immunotherapy drug targeting the protein TIM-3 works to stimulate the immune system. (2018-01-30)

Mesothelin engineered on virus-like particles provides treatment clues for pancreatic cancer
New understanding of a protein that spurs the growth of pancreatic cancer could lead to a new vaccine against the deadly disease, said researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston in a report appearing in the current edition of the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. (2008-02-15)

A new therapeutic target to fight metastasis in ovarian cancer
Researchers of IDIBELL - ICO have described a key cellular receptor in the processes of metastasis in ovarian cancer. The finding might lead to the use of inhibitors of this receptor as a therapeutic target in the most aggressive variants of the disease. (2018-01-04)

Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer
A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma. (2019-01-04)

Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators report finding finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can significantly improve the delivery of cancer nanomedicines by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient 'burst' of nanoencapsulated drugs from capillaries into the tumor. (2017-05-31)

Drug suppresses spread of breast cancer caused by stem-like cells
Rare stem-like tumor cells play a critical role in the spread of breast cancer, but a vulnerability in the pathway that powers them offers a strategy to target these cells using existing drugs before metastatic disease occurs, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers. (2017-12-11)

An index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cells
The new methodology measures tumor aggressiveness and the risk of relapse, helping doctors plan treatment, according to Brazilian scientists authors of a paper published in a special issue of the journal Cell. (2018-04-05)

Treatment for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients
Treatments for the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis usually include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab, cyclophosphamide and tumor resection. The researchers aimed to compare the efficacy of the treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab or cyclophosphamide for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients without tumor and to discuss potential biomarkers for this disease. (2018-03-14)

UVA researchers discover a new target for 'triple-negative' breast cancer
One of the most difficult to treat cancers - triple-negative breast cancer - may be vulnerable to a new approach, an early study indicates. (2017-11-20)

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foes
Mouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report. Georgia Cancer Center scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer. (2018-04-03)

Tumor growth parameters predict response to anti-angiogenic therapy in mice
Using a mathematical modeling approach, scientists have found that certain parameters of tumor growth in mice can predict the effectiveness of drugs that block formation of tumor-nourishing blood vessels. The findings are published in PLOS Computational Biology. (2017-12-21)

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