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Popular Tumors News and Current Events, Tumors News Articles.
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Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumors
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply. (2018-02-14)

Prostate cancer: New computer model enables researchers to predict course of disease
How does a normal cell turn into a deadly cancer? Seeking an answer to this Question researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin examined the tumor genomes of nearly 300 prostate cancer patients. Their findings describe the ways in which changes in the prostate cells' genetic information pave the way for cancer development. Using a newly developed computer model, it is now possible to predict the course of the disease in individual patients. The results of this study were now published in Cancer Cell. (2018-12-14)

Nanoparticles: Acidic alert
Researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have synthesized nanoparticles that can be induced by a change in pH to release a deadly dose of ionized iron within cells. This mechanism could potentially open up new approaches to the targeted elimination of malignant tumors. (2020-04-17)

Tumor-associated bacteria hitches a ride to metastatic sites
The same bacteria present in primary tumors of patients with colorectal cancer are also present in liver metastases, a new study finds. (2017-11-23)

Gentle cancer treatment using nanoparticles works
Cancer treatments based on laser irridation of tiny nanoparticles that are injected directly into the cancer tumor are working and can destroy the cancer from within. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute and the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Copenhagen have developed a method that kills cancer cells using nanoparticles and lasers. The treatment has been tested on mice and it has been demonstrated that the cancer tumors are considerably damaged. (2016-08-03)

A better test for the tumor-targeting of CAR-T therapies
Ludwig Cancer Research scientists have developed a method to significantly improve the preclinical evaluation of chimeric antigen-receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, in which the immune system's T cells are extracted from a patient, engineered to target a specific tumor-associated molecule and then grown and reinfused for cancer treatment. (2020-11-06)

Mutation promts lung tumor cells to morph into gut cells
Researchers were surprised when they recently spotted a miniature gut hidden in the cells of lung tumor samples. They discovered that these cells had lost a gene called NKX2-1 that acts as a master switch, flipping a network of genes to set the course for a lung cell. Without it, the cells follow the path of their nearest developmental neighbor -- the gut -- much like a train jumping tracks when a railroad switch fails. (2018-03-26)

Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasis
Researchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis. (2018-01-15)

Combination approach shows promise for beating advanced melanoma
A UCLA-led study has found that a treatment that uses a bacteria-like agent in combination with an immunotherapy drug could help some people with advanced melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer, live longer. (2018-08-28)

Study sheds new light on mechanism of breast cancer treatment resistance
A study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has illuminated a specific mechanism by which estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers can become resistant to standard therapies and metastasize. (2018-02-12)

Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survival
Brain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. Despite initial response to treatment, most aggressive brain tumors eventually recur and are ultimately incurable. Multiple studies suggest that cancer stem cells within these tumors resist therapy and are responsible for tumor recurrences. Researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have devised a strategy to treat these tumors by identifying a secretion-mediated pathway that's essential for maintaining glioma cancer stem cells. (2018-02-05)

Insights into how brain cancer evades the immune system
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that some types of glioblastoma tumors may be able to shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) -- small packages of biomaterial -- that can help to suppress the body's ability to mount an immune response against the tumor. (2018-03-07)

Researchers discover new anti-cancer protein
An international team of researchers has discovered a new anti-cancer protein. The protein, called LHPP, prevents the uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells in the liver. The researchers led by Professor Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum, University of Basel, report in Nature that LHPP can also serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer. (2018-03-21)

Researchers stop 'sneaky' cancer cells in their tracks
A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. (2018-11-20)

Crunching the data: New liver cancer subtypes revealed immunologically
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used substantial datasets on liver cancer patients to develop a new classification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) into three distinct subgroups with different genetic, immunological, and clinical features. The findings of HCC subtypes related to metabolic disease, immunosuppression, or mitogenic/stem-cell-like tumors should aid the development of more targeted treatment and promote the fight against this devastating disease. (2019-02-01)

Deadly lung cancers are driven by multiple genetic changes
A new UC San Francisco-led study challenges the dogma in oncology that most cancers are caused by one dominant 'driver' mutation that can be treated in isolation with a single targeted drug. Instead, the new research finds one of the world's most deadly forms of lung cancer is driven by changes in multiple different genes, which appear to work together to drive cancer progression and to allow tumors to evade targeted therapy. (2017-11-06)

Penn Vet study uncovers therapeutic targets for aggressive triple-negative breast cancers
New findings from a study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made inroads into a strategy to identify triple-negative breast cancers at risk for metastasis, and eventually target these cancers with drugs. (2018-02-02)

Sensitive new assay finds abnormalities in tumor cells that other techniques may miss
RNA-Seq, a new next-generation assay, can detect gene fusions in solid tumor cells with high accuracy and excellent reproducibility. According to a new report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, the assay detected 93 percent of gene fusions identified by currently available methods with no false positives. Importantly, gene fusions missed by other techniques were found, including 18 that had never been described before. This study paves the way for clinical use to advance the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. (2018-06-18)

WSU researchers deliver first 'nanotherapeutics' to tumor
For the first time, WSU researchers have demonstrated a way to deliver a drug to a tumor by attaching it to a blood cell. The innovation could let doctors target tumors with anticancer drugs that might otherwise damage healthy tissues. (2017-05-15)

Cannabinoids may have a vast array of anti-cancer effects
Previous research has shown that cannabinoids can help lessen side effects of anti-cancer therapies. Now a new British Journal of Pharmacology review has examined their potential for the direct treatment of cancer. (2018-07-18)

CT scans may increase the risk of brain cancer
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors. (2018-07-18)

Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients. (2020-07-09)

Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound
Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease. University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to find hypoxic spots noninvasively in real time. The researchers developed an oxygen-sensitive molecular beacon that emits ultrasound signals in response to light, a process called photoacoustic imaging. (2017-12-08)

Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows
A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice. In mice with tumors of osteosarcoma - a bone cancer that is notoriously painful and difficult to treat -- endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumors and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and caused cancer cell death. (2018-07-13)

Laser light detects tumors
A team of researchers from Jena presents a groundbreaking new method for the rapid, gentle and reliable detection of tumors with laser light. The Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) introduced a compact device for rapid cancer diagnosis during surgery at the leading trade fair ''Laser World of Photonics'' from 24 to 27 June 2019 in Munich. The optical method will help surgeons to remove tumors more precisely and perspectively could make cancer operations possible without a scalpel. (2019-06-25)

Nixing the cells that nix immune response against cancer
For first time, study characterizes uptick of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the spleens of human cancer patients, paving the way for therapies directed against these cells that collude with cancer. (2017-02-02)

For women with kidney cancer, belly fat matters
Belly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that kidney cancer may develop and progress differently in women than men. (2018-04-03)

Combination treatment, diabetes drug and immunotherapy, may help to fight breast cancer
Researchers in Finland have discovered a drug combination that collaborates with the cancer cells' own MYC oncoprotein, which in large quantities causes self-destruction of the cancer cells. When this combination is enhanced with immune system-boosting anti-PD-1 therapy, a more effective and long-lasting therapeutic effect can be seen in mice. These findings pave the way for new treatment combination strategies to harness the body's natural defenses to fight cancer. (2019-02-06)

Altitude training for cancer-fighting cells
Oxygen starvation could toughen up immune T cells for cancer immunotherapy. (2017-09-18)

Making milestones against non-small cell lung cancer
Progress concerning Lung cancer has been enormous in the past 20 years, according to a new review from researchers at Yale Cancer Center. (2018-01-24)

Sylvester researcher uses HPV vaccine to treat patient with skin cancer
In 2017, a case report by Dr. Anna Nichols showed the HPV vaccine Gardasil reduced the number of new basal and squamous cell skin cancers in two patients. Tim Ioannides, M.D., a voluntary faculty member at UM, suggested using the vaccine as an off-label treatment by directly injecting it into the tumors. (2018-07-03)

Nanoparticles for lung cancer pass next test
Non-small cell lung cancer Nanoparticles pass the next stage of development in preclinical tests. (2018-04-10)

Trial compares laparoscopic and open surgeries for pancreatic cancer
A randomized clinical trial has compared keyhole (laparoscopic) surgery and open surgery in pancreatic cancer patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, or the Whipple procedure. (2017-09-13)

Newly discovered biomarkers could be key to predicting severity of brain tumor recurrence
Researchers have identified predictive biomarkers that could help assess the level of risk for recurrence in patients with malignant glioma. The study, led by Henry Ford Health System, was published today in Cell Reports. In an analysis of 200 tumor samples, the authors identified a set of epigenetic biomarkers that can predict, at a patient's initial diagnosis, which tumors are likely to recur with a more aggressive tumor type. (2018-04-10)

State's first single incision robotic kidney removal
For the first time in Michigan, a diseased kidney has been surgically removed at Henry Ford Hospital using highly sophisticated 3-D robotics through a single incision. (2008-08-25)

Handheld 'pen' may bring real-time cancer diagnosis to surgeons' fingertips
Scientists have developed a handheld probe capable of non-destructively distinguishing between tumors and healthy tissue within 10 seconds, which could enable rapid cancer diagnoses and help surgeons remove all traces of malignant masses during operations. (2017-09-06)

Why cancer drugs can't take the pressure
A major reason why cancer drugs fail is that they cannot penetrate the high-pressure environment of solid tumors. A study published May 10 in Biophysical Journal reveals that hyaluronic acid is primarily responsible for generating elevated gel-fluid pressures in tumors. In a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, treatment with an enzyme that breaks down hyaluronic acid normalized fluid pressure in tumors and allowed vessels to re-expand, thereby overcoming a major barrier to drug delivery. (2016-05-10)

SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for somatostatin receptor PET imaging
The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for somatostatin receptor PET imaging in neuroendocrine tumors. This AUC is part of a new series developed by SNMMI in its role as a qualified provider-led entity (PLE) under the Medicare Appropriate Use Criteria Program for Advanced Diagnostic Imaging. The AUC for somatostatin receptor PET imaging addresses several clinical scenarios for diagnosing neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). (2018-01-04)

Better prognosticating for dogs with mammary tumors
For dogs with mammary tumors, deciding a course of treatment can depend on a variety of factors, some of which may seem to contradict one another. With a new, practical system developed by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians and colleagues, determining a prognosis and making treatment decisions should be an easier task. (2019-06-14)

Imaging agent helps predict success of lung cancer therapy
Doctors contemplating the best therapy for lung cancer patients may soon be able to predict the efficacy of a widely used lung cancer drug based on an imaging agent and a simple scan, according to the findings of a new clinical trial co-led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-03-07)

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