Popular Uranium News and Current Events

Popular Uranium News and Current Events, Uranium News Articles.
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Primordial black holes may have helped to forge heavy elements
Astronomers like to say we are the byproducts of stars, stellar furnaces that long ago fused hydrogen and helium into the elements needed for life through the process of stellar nucleosynthesis. (2017-08-04)

Scientists find safer ways to detect uranium minerals
The threat of (2006-11-20)

Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuse
Many manufacturers use coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete and other building materials. But a new study finds that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China is too radioactive for this use. Some coal ash analyzed in the study contained radiation 43 times higher than the maximum safe limit set for residential building materials by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. (2017-11-09)

New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fission
A research group based in a number of countries (Japan, Malaysia, Ukraine, and Germany), led by Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), have proposed an improved model for predicting the generation of thermal energy from nuclear fission processes, by focusing on Uranium-236. This model can help improve efficiency in nuclear power generation. (2017-12-27)

Retreat of the ice followed by millennia of methane release
Methane was seeping from the seafloor for thousands of years following the retreat of the Barents Sea ice sheet, shows a groundbreaking new study in Nature Communications. (2016-05-13)

Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutonium
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a new technology for multipurpose application of large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium accumulated in Russia and across the world. Instead of expensive storage of this nuclear material, TPU physicists propose to burn weapons-grade plutonium in reactors with thorium fuel, converting it into power and thermal energy. The units are capable of operating at low capacity (from 60 MW) at least 10-20 years. (2018-01-19)

Scientists estimate solar nebula's lifetime
MIT scientists have a new estimate for the lifetime of the solar nebula, the gaseous precursor of the solar system: Measurements from ancient meteorites suggest the solar nebula disappeared within 4 million years. (2017-02-09)

Newly discovered organic nanowires leave manmade technologies in their dust
A microbial protein fiber discovered by a Michigan State University scientist transports charges at rates high enough to be applied in manmade nanotechnologies. The discovery, featured in the current issue of Scientific Reports, describes the high-speed protein fiber produced by uranium-reducing Geobacter bacteria. The fibers are hair-like protein filaments called 'pili' that have the unique property of transporting charges at speeds of 1 billion electrons per second. (2016-03-24)

A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products
Researchers in Japan have proposed a more efficient method to reduce radioactive waste. The study involves converting radioactive material into short-lived nuclides by absorbing surplus neutrons in the core peripheral portion of a small fast reactor faster than they are generated in the core, thus providing an effective way to lessen the burden of nuclear waste on future generations. (2017-11-14)

Uranium to replace plastic? Chemistry breakthrough could pave the way for new materials
Uranium can perform reactions that previously no one thought possible, which could transform the way industry makes bulk chemicals, polymers, and the precursors to new drugs and plastics, according to new findings from The University of Manchester. (2017-12-01)

Widespread uranium contamination found in India's groundwater
A Duke-led study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater aquifers -- a chief source for drinking water and irrigation -- in 16 Indian states. The primary source of the contamination is natural, but human factors such as groundwater-table depletion and nitrate pollution may exacerbate the problem. Studies have linked exposure to uranium in drinking water to chronic kidney disease. (2018-06-07)

Pipe-crawling robot will help decommission DOE nuclear facility
A pair of autonomous robots developed by Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute will soon be driving through miles of pipes at the US Department of Energy's former uranium enrichment plant in Piketon, Ohio, to identify uranium deposits on pipe walls. (2018-03-20)

Common bricks can be used to detect past presence of uranium, plutonium
Researchers have demonstrated a technique that can determine whether bricks -- the common building material -- have ever been near a radiological source, and identify the specific type of source, such as high enriched uranium or plutonium. (2018-03-01)

Model based on hydrothermal sources evaluate possibility of life Jupiter's icy moon
Brazilian scientists compare primitive Earth scenario with satellite Europa's conditions; the jupiterian moon could host microorganisms at the bottom of a huge warm ocean located underneath its frozen crust. (2018-02-23)

Potential approach to how radioactive elements could be 'fished out' of nuclear waste
Manchester scientists have revealed how arsenic molecules might be used to 'fish out' the most toxic elements from radioactive nuclear waste -- a breakthrough that could make the decommissioning industry even safer and more effective. (2017-03-10)

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching power
Sewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers. Now, a bacterium discovered by Princeton researchers in a New Jersey swamp may offer a more efficient method for treating toxins found in sewage, fertilizer runoff and other forms of water pollution. (2018-04-11)

Highly efficient heavy metal ions filter
ETH researchers have developed a new water filtration system that is superior to existing systems in many respects: it is extremely efficient at removing various toxic heavy metal ions and radioactive substances from water and can even be used in gold recovery. (2016-01-25)

Geologists found links between deep sea methane emissions and ice ages
Since 2012, researchers at the Division of Bedrock Geology in the Department of Geology of Tallinn University of Technology Aivo Lepland and Tõnu Martma have been engaged in the research of an international research group investigating the factors controlling methane seepages and reconstructing the chronology of past methane emissions in one of the world's most climate-sensitive regions -- the Barents Sea in the Arctic. (2019-09-11)

Synthetic clay could assist radioactive waste cleanup
Researchers from Pennsylvania State University supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) have performed an important step in the drive to remove environmentally harmful materials from waste streams and drinking water. (2001-04-10)

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinction
A research team, led by scientists from Arizona State University and funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation, is helping to understand why the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event happened and why it took life so long to recover. (2018-04-17)

Late Pleistocene human mandibles from the Niah Caves may hint at ancient diets
Three human mandibles may provide new insight into the diet of Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in Borneo, according to a study published June 6, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darren Curnoe from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and colleagues. (2018-06-06)

Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to 'maybe.'
Princeton geoscientists Blair Schoene and Gerta Keller led an international team of researchers who have assembled the first high-resolution timeline for the massive eruptions in India's Deccan Traps, determining that the largest eruption pulse occurred less than 100,000 years before the mass extinction that killed the (non-avian) dinosaurs. (2019-02-22)

Triplet superconductivity demonstrated under high pressure
Researchers in France and Japan have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. (2019-04-18)

Coral reefs grow faster and healthier when parrotfish are abundant
A new study by Smithsonian scientists and colleagues that reveals 3,000 years of change in reefs in the western Caribbean provides long-term, compelling evidence that parrotfish, which eat algae that can smother corals, are vital to coral-reef growth and health. (2017-01-23)

MIT: Lack of fuel may limit US nuclear power expansion
Limited supplies of fuel for nuclear power plants may thwart the renewed and growing interest in nuclear energy in the United States and other nations, says an MIT expert on the industry. (2007-03-21)

Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy
Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in the cost and efficiency of extracting uranium resources from oceans for sustainable energy production. (2019-05-16)

Russia's use and stockpiles of highly enriched uranium pose significant nuclear risks
Russia currently holds the world's largest stockpile of highly enriched uranium, a nuclear weapon-usable material, posing significant nuclear security risks, according to a new Princeton University report. (2017-09-13)

Researchers model the way into a nuclear future
The main type of nuclear fuel is the uranium oxide pellet composition. But there is incomplete understanding of fuel transformation mechanisms during nuclear reactor operating, which delays the full implementation of nuclear fuel. In this study, Artem Lunev, Alexey Kuksin, and Sergey Starikov obtained a model to study the macroscopic processes occurring in uranium oxide pellets under operating conditions. The work of Russian researchers is a major step forward in nuclear fuel swelling and embrittlement description during operation by means of computer simulations. (2016-12-19)

From crystals to climate: 'Gold standard' timeline links flood basalts to climate change
Princeton geologists used tiny zircon crystals found in volcanic ash to rewrite the timeline for the eruptions of the Columbia River flood basalts, a series of massive lava flows that coincided with an ancient global warming period 16 million years ago. (2018-09-19)

En route to the optical nuclear clock
Together with colleagues from Munich and Mainz, researchers at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have performed the first-ever optical measurements of some important properties of the low-energy state of the Th-229 nucleus. In this way, a laser excitation of the atomic nucleus can be monitored, thus allowing an optical nuclear clock to be realized that 'ticks' more precisely than present-day atomic clocks. The scientists have reported their results in the current issue of Nature. (2018-04-18)

Going nuclear on the moon and Mars
It might sound like science fiction, but scientists are preparing to build colonies on the moon and, eventually, Mars. With NASA planning its next human mission to the moon in 2024, researchers are looking for options to power settlements on the lunar surface. According to a new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, nuclear fission reactors have emerged as top candidates to generate electricity in space.  (2020-05-20)

The formation of gold deposits in South Africa
The Witwatersrand basin in South Africa hosts the largest known gold repository on Earth -- but how was it formed? Scientists of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre of Ocean Research Kiel and Canadian research institutes were able to figure out how parts of the Earth's largest gold deposits formed about three billion years ago. Crude oil and hot hydrothermal fluids played a major role. (2017-04-20)

Neanderthals thought like we do
Using Uranium-Thorium dating an international team of researchers co-directed by Dirk Hoffmann of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, demonstrates that more than 115,000 years ago Neanderthals produced symbolic objects, and that they created cave art more than 20,000 years before modern humans first arrived in Europe. The researchers conclude that our cousins' cognitive abilities were equivalent to our own. (2018-02-22)

Three new uranium minerals from Utah
Three new minerals discovered by a Michigan Tech alumnus are secondary crusts found in old uranium mines in southern Utah. They're bright, yellow and hard to find. Meet leesite, leószilárdite and redcanyonite. (2017-02-07)

Campus natural gas power plants pose no radon risks
When Penn State decided to convert its two power plants from their historic use of coal as a source of energy to natural gas, there was concern about radon emissions. Although radon is known to exist in natural gas, now Penn State research indicates that it does not escape from these two power plants in harmful amounts. (2017-02-06)

Six degrees of nuclear separation
For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.) (2019-10-11)

Dating A Caveman
Mass spectrographic U-238->U-234->Th-230 dating of Zhoukoudian cave limestone strata lying just above those in which fossils of (1996-05-13)

Portable superconductivity systems for small motors
Superconductivity is one of modern physics' most intriguing scientific discoveries. However, practical exploitation of superconductivity also presents many challenges. The challenges are perhaps greatest for researchers trying to integrate superconductivity in small, portable systems. Researchers demonstrate this week in Applied Physics Letters, that a portable superconducting magnetic system, which is, in essence, a high performance substitute for a conventional permanent magnet, can attain a 3-tesla level for the magnetic field. (2017-02-07)

Nuclear CSI: Noninvasive procedure could identify criminal nuclear activity
Determining if an individual has handled nuclear materials is a challenge national defense agencies currently face. The standard protocol to detect uranium exposure is through a urine sample; however, urine is able to only identify those who have been recently exposed. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri have developed procedures that will better identify individuals exposed to uranium within one year. Scientists and homeland security experts believe this noninvasive procedure could identify individuals who may be smuggling nuclear materials for criminal purposes. (2016-11-01)

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from China have proposed a way to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water. As an essential nuclear fuel, uranium has been greatly used an inevitably released to the environment. Without proper disposal, exposure to uranium can result in serious harms to the ecology and health of humans. (2019-03-14)

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