Popular Urinary Incontinence News and Current Events

Popular Urinary Incontinence News and Current Events, Urinary Incontinence News Articles.
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New study demonstrates significant and sustained improvements in BPH symptoms with AVODART ™
New clinical study findings showed that men with symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as enlarged prostate, taking AVODART for four years had sustained, long-term improvement in three major markers of BPH -- urinary symptoms, urinary flow rates and prostate volume reduction. AVODART is the first and only dual 5alpha-reductase (5AR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of BPH. (2004-04-14)

For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress -- and vice versa
A new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. Interestingly, the reverse was also true as experiencing more distress led to worse function. The likelihood of this reciprocal relationship highlights the importance of greater investment in psychosocial care to mitigate treatment side effects in prostate cancer survivors. (2018-05-31)

Zinc deficiency may play a role in high blood pressure
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Renal Physiology. (2019-01-24)

Green tea may protect the bladder from becoming inflamed
Herbal agents could be used to treat inflammatory bladder diseases, according to a preliminary study that looked at the ability of green tea to protect bladder cells from inflammation. The University of Pittsburgh study found that components of green tea protected bladder cells from damage in culture. Green tea, reported to have many health benefits, is rich in powerful antioxidants that make it a desired remedy for many medical conditions. (2007-05-20)

Research reveals risk factors for urgency urinary incontinence
In a large representative British population of individuals in their late 60s, the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 15 percent in men and 54 percent in women. (2018-03-07)

Synthetic cannabis ('spice', 'k2') use may boost stroke risk in young users
Synthetic cannabis, also popularly known as 'spice' or 'k2,' may boost the risk of a stroke in young users, warn US doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2018-06-07)

Scientists unearth secrets of Sir Alexander Fleming's medical breakthroughs
A century after Sir Alexander Fleming made two of the most important medical breakthroughs, scientists have unlocked the secret of how his discoveries may contribute to recurrent patient infections. (2018-02-15)

Study examines urinary tract infections and antibiotic use in nursing homes
In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days. (2018-01-10)

Mayo-led study: Drug reduces hot flashes, improves breast cancer survivor quality of life
Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. These findings were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-07)

Sitting and physical inactivity may increase risk of urinary tract symptoms
Prolonged sitting time and low physical activity levels were linked with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a BJU International study of 69,795 middle-aged Korean men. (2018-03-21)

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it. The researchers employed machine learning to mine decades of electronic health records of nearly 20,000 individuals. (2019-08-21)

Stephanie Faubion, M.D., talks genitourinary syndrome of menopause
A new article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reviews options for women going through genitourinary syndrome of menopause -- an encompassing term for vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia and urinary tract infections brought on by low estrogen levels after menopause. (2017-12-01)

Cranberry sauce: good for what ails you
Cranberry sauce is not the star of the traditional Thanksgiving Day meal, but when it comes to health benefits, the lowly condiment takes center stage. In fact, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute have found that compounds in cranberries are able to alter E. coli bacteria, which are responsible for a host of human illnesses, in ways that render them unable to initiate an infection. (2007-11-13)

A new mutation in kidney disease
Osaka University researchers find an unexpected mutation in proteins of the exosome could be a valuable biomarker for diagnosing the risk of kidney disease. (2017-06-14)

Biomarkers indicating diminished reserve of eggs not associated with reduced fertility
Among women of older reproductive age attempting to conceive naturally, biomarkers indicating diminished ovarian reserve compared with normal ovarian reserve were not associated with reduced fertility, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-10)

Novel diagnosis of preeclampsia with proteomic analysis
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that analyzing proteins in urine is a simple and objective method to diagnose and classify preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy causing high blood pressure after 20 weeks of gestation. (2006-02-03)

Prostate problems also associated with sleep disorders and depression
Men who suffer from urological problems such as erectile dysfunction, urinary tract and bladder problems or infertility issues often also suffer from depression and sleep disorders. Physicians should therefore be aware of these risks so that they can refer their patients to relevant specialists and provide comprehensive and timely care of male patients. This is according to Arman Walia of the University of California Irvine in the US, in a study in the Springer Nature-branded IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal. (2018-08-31)

Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. (2016-04-25)

Infectious diseases bring millions of elderly to emergency departments each year
Investigators estimate that during 2012, there were more than 3.1 million emergency department visits for infectious diseases among elderly US adults. (2016-01-04)

Urinary markers may indicate prognosis after kidney transplantation
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that certain markers can help predict which patients may experience problems after receiving an organ transplant. (2017-09-07)

New skin barrier product reduces costs for ostomy care
Ostomy patients using a new type of skin barrier product -- infused with ceramides that play an essential role in the normal barrier function of the skin--experience lower costs of care, according to a randomized trial published in the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, the official journal of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses (WOCN®) Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-01-09)

Women who get frequent UTIs may reduce risk by drinking plenty of water
Women who suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections may reduce their risk by drinking more water, according to an IDWeek 2017 study. (2017-10-05)

Understanding the mechanics of the urinary bladder
Dr. S. Roccabianca and Dr. T.R. Bush, researchers from Michigan State University compiled an extensive review of the key contributions to understanding the mechanics of the bladder ranging from work conducted in the 1970s through the present time with a focus on material testing and theoretical modeling. The review appears in a forthcoming issue of the journal TECHNOLOGY. (2016-05-20)

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for prostate cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that men 55 to 69 who are interested in screening talk to their doctors about potential benefits and harms of screening for prostate cancer before deciding whether to undergo periodic prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening. The USPSTF recommends against PSA-based screening for men 70 and older. (2018-05-08)

Genitourinary health problems worse for sexually abused girls
A study in The Journal of Pediatrics by researchers at Université de Montréal reveals that sexual assaults on children leads to an increase in genitourinary health problems in girls but not in boys. (2017-12-19)

Lab-engineered ovaries superior to hormone drugs in animal model
New research in rats suggests the possibility of bioengineering artificial ovaries in the lab to provide a safer, more natural hormone replacement therapy for women. A safe therapy, with the potential to improve bone and uterine health, as well as body composition, is expected to become increasing important as the population ages. (2017-12-05)

Study links gastric bypass surgery to increased risk of kidney stones
Morbidly obese patients who undergo a particular type of gastric bypass surgery called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are at an increased risk of developing kidney stones -- small, pebble-like deposits that can result in severe pain and require an operation to remove them -- earlier than previously thought. (2008-06-26)

New study reassures women about the safety of vaginal estrogen
Although hot flashes are the most commonly reported problem associated with menopause, between 20 percent and 45 percent of women also complain of sexual and urinary issues. There is good news. A recent study documents that vaginal estrogen is not only effective but also safe for the treatment of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause. The study results have been published in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2017-08-17)

One-off PSA screening for prostate cancer does not save lives
Inviting men with no symptoms to a one-off PSA test for prostate cancer does not save lives according to results from the largest ever prostate cancer trial conducted over 10 years by Cancer Research UK-funded scientists and published today (Tuesday) in JAMA. (2018-03-06)

Teenagers with incontinence are at risk of underachieving at secondary school
New research has found teenagers with incontinence are at greater risk of underachieving academically, and need more support to remove barriers so they can reach their academic potential. (2017-12-11)

Charting an underexplored landscape: The genitourinary microbiome
More sensitive cultivation methods and precise 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques have revealed that the human bladder hosts a significant microbiome and those diverse bacteria inside the bladder impact pediatric urologic diseases. (2018-04-05)

Genitourinary injuries challenge returning US servicemen
In an article in The Journal of Urology, researchers from the US military medical community have examined the extent and severity of genitourinary injuries among nearly 1,400 US service members (SMs) and emphasize the critical need for novel treatments to improve sexual, urinary, or reproductive function among those with severe genital injury. (2017-01-09)

Novel nuclear medicine test can identify kidney transplant infection
German scientists have developed a novel nuclear medicine test that can determine whether a kidney transplant patient has developed infection in the transplanted tissue. The study, which utilizes positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), is presented in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2017-11-08)

Link between bacteria metabolism and communication could pave way for new drugs
New research, which appears in the journal Science Advances, shows that LsrK forms a complex with HPr, a protein involved in glucose utilization in E. coli. (2018-06-01)

Viruses that infect bacteria abound in bladder
Phages -- viruses that infect bacteria -- are abundant in the bacteria that inhabit the female bladder. This is good news, because phage could be used as alternative treatment when antibiotics become resistant to pathogenic bacteria. (2018-01-29)

Men with prostate cancer willing to accept lower survival odds to avoid side effects
Men who have been newly diagnosed with prostate cancer say they would trade some improvement in their odds of survival for improvements in side effects and quality of life, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference. (2018-11-04)

Antibiotic resistance increases relapse in urinary tract infections
Patients with a certain drug-resistant urinary tract infection were more likely to have a relapse of their infection within a week than those with non-resistant infections and were more likely to be prescribed an incorrect antibiotic according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2018-10-30)

Cranberry juice creates energy barrier that keeps bacteria away from cells, study shows
People have long consumed cranberry juice to ward off urinary tract infections, though the exact nature of its action has not been clear. A new study by researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute reveals a key mechanism that may help account for its disease preventing abilities. The juice, the study shows, changes the thermodynamic properties of bacteria, creating an energy barrier that prevents the microorganisms from latching onto cells in the urinary tract. (2008-07-21)

Randomized trial finds ibuprofen not a safe alternative to antibiotics for UTIs
Ibuprofen, given instead of antibiotics to women with uncomplicated urinary tract infection (cystitis), leads to longer duration of symptoms and more serious adverse events related to the spread of the primary infection, according to a new study in PLOS Medicine by Ingvild Vik and colleagues from the University of Oslo, Norway. (2018-05-15)

Tension-free vaginal tape found effective for treating urinary incontinence
Long-term results from a BJU International study indicate that tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) may be a highly effective and safe option for certain patients with urinary incontinence. (2018-02-22)

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