Popular Urine News and Current Events

Popular Urine News and Current Events, Urine News Articles.
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Strike three
Researchers uncover a previously unrecognized mechanism that may accelerate polycystic kidney disease. (2019-08-26)

Zinc deficiency may play a role in high blood pressure
Lower-than-normal zinc levels may contribute to high blood pressure (hypertension) by altering the way the kidneys handle sodium. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Renal Physiology. (2019-01-24)

Researchers discover experimental obesity drug prevents development of kidney stones
Copenhagen: Scientists have found that a drug connected with fat regulation prevents the formation of kidney stones in mice. This early work opens the possibility of developing drugs which may help prevent kidney stones in at-risk individuals. The work is presented at the European Association of Urology Conference in Copenhagen. (2018-03-16)

Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolism
Tracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming. (2018-02-01)

Protein in, ammonia out
A recent study has compiled and analyzed data from 25 previous studies. Researchers honed in on factors that influence how much ammonia dairy barns emit. (2016-06-29)

Bacteria in urine doesn't always indicate infection
Doctors should think carefully before testing patients for a urinary tract infection (UTI) to avoid over-diagnosis and unnecessary antibiotic treatment, according to updated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2019-03-21)

Synthetic cannabis ('spice', 'k2') use may boost stroke risk in young users
Synthetic cannabis, also popularly known as 'spice' or 'k2,' may boost the risk of a stroke in young users, warn US doctors writing in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2018-06-07)

Metals known to have harmful health effects found in indigenous exposed to oil spills
People from two indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who live close to the country's longest oil pipeline have mercury, cadmium and lead in their bodies at concentrations that could be harmful to their health. (2018-02-09)

Arsenic exposure could increase diabetes risk
Inorganic arsenic, commonly found in ground water in certain areas, may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2008-08-19)

Exposure to benzene during pregnancy: a pilot study raises concerns in British Columbia
Université de Montréal research reveals that 29 pregnant women living near natural-gas hydraulic fracturing sites had a median concentration of a benzene biomarker in their urine that was 3.5 times higher than that found in women from the general Canadian population. (2017-11-13)

NUP160 genetic mutation linked to steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome
Mutations in the NUP160 gene, which encodes one protein component of the nuclear pore complex nucleoporin 160 kD, are implicated in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, an international team reports March 25, 2019, in JASN. (2019-03-26)

Gene-based test for urine detects, monitors bladder cancer
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers. (2018-03-22)

Study finds novel genetic risk factors for kidney disease
An international team of researchers has identified three genes containing common mutations that are associated with altered kidney disease risk. One of the discovered genes, the UMOD gene, produces Tamm-Horsfall protein, the most common protein in the urine of healthy individuals. Although the Tamm-Horsfall protein has been known for almost 60 years, its functions are not well understood and its relationship to chronic kidney disease risk was not known previously. (2009-05-10)

How cats and dogs are consuming and processing parabens
Many households can claim at least one four-legged friend as part of the family. But pets that primarily stay indoors can have increased rates of diseases, such as diabetes, kidney diseases and hypothyroidism compared with those that stay exclusively outside. Some scientists propose that chemical substances in the home could contribute to these illnesses. One group has examined how pets could be exposed to parabens, as reported in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2018-03-07)

Sitting and physical inactivity may increase risk of urinary tract symptoms
Prolonged sitting time and low physical activity levels were linked with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a BJU International study of 69,795 middle-aged Korean men. (2018-03-21)

High salt intake associated with doubled risk of heart failure
High salt intake is associated with a doubled risk of heart failure, according to a 12-year study in more than 4 000 people presented today at ESC Congress. (2017-08-27)

Opioid controlled substance agreements safely reduce health care visits, Mayo study finds
The medical community has long known that patients on long-term opioid therapy often have significantly more health care visits. But adhering to a standardized care process model for opioid prescriptions appears to reduce the overall number of health care visits for these patients while maintaining safety, shows new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-09-20)

Many patients show signs of chronic kidney disease before diabetes diagnosis
Many patients who will later be diagnosed with diabetes show signs of chronic kidney disease even before their diabetes diagnosis, according to a study by Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues in Tennessee. The researchers looked at data on more than 36,000 veterans who were diagnosed with diabetes between 2003 and 2013. (2018-03-14)

Georgetown technique using urine suggest individualize bladder cancer treatment possible
Researchers have devised a very promising non-invasive and individualized technique for detecting and treating bladder cancer. The method uses a 'liquid biopsy' -- a urine specimen -- instead of the invasive tumor sampling needed today, and a method developed and patented by Georgetown to culture cancer cells that can reveal the molecular underpinnings of each patient's unique bladder cancer. (2019-07-25)

Experimental insecticide explodes mosquitoes, not honeybees
In a new study, Vanderbilt pharmacologist Jerod Denton, Ph.D., Ohio State entomologist Peter Piermarini, Ph.D., and colleagues report an experimental molecule that inhibits kidney function in mosquitoes and thus might provide a new way to control the deadliest animal on Earth. (2016-12-05)

More efficient method devised to drug test athletes
It will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs. (2018-02-08)

Novel diagnosis of preeclampsia with proteomic analysis
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that analyzing proteins in urine is a simple and objective method to diagnose and classify preeclampsia, a complication of pregnancy causing high blood pressure after 20 weeks of gestation. (2006-02-03)

Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. (2016-04-25)

Exposure to chemical found in plastics 'hard to avoid' in everyday life
86 per cent of teenagers have traces of Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical compound used to make plastics, in their body, an Engaged Research public engagement project in collaboration with the University of Exeter has found. (2018-02-05)

Substance in hair may be a marker for alcohol consumption
A new Drug Testing & Analysis study reveals that measuring levels of ethyl sulfate (EtS), a metabolite of ethanol, in the hair can be used to assess alcohol consumption. (2018-06-20)

Study links gastric bypass surgery to increased risk of kidney stones
Morbidly obese patients who undergo a particular type of gastric bypass surgery called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are at an increased risk of developing kidney stones -- small, pebble-like deposits that can result in severe pain and require an operation to remove them -- earlier than previously thought. (2008-06-26)

Scientists create functioning kidney tissue
Scientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science. The study led by Professors Sue Kimber and Adrian Woolf from The University of Manchester, signifies a significant milestone in the development of treatment for kidney disease. (2018-02-09)

HKBU study reveals human skin flakes lead to bad smell in air-conditioning systems
Skin squames are a source of food for the bacteria found in air-cooling units, which produce odours even in a dust-free air-conditioning system, a research by Hong Kong Baptist University scholars revealed. (2018-01-31)

Wildfires may cause long-term health problems for endangered orangutans
Orangutans, already critically endangered due to habitat loss from logging and farming, may face another threat in the form of smoke from natural and human-caused fires, a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study finds. The study appears in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-05-15)

New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids
As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors -- and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from an overdose. (2017-12-06)

Switching from smoking to glo significantly reduces exposure to toxicants
Clinical studies by scientists at British American Tobacco indicate that when smokers switched completely from conventional cigarettes to glo, their exposure to certain harmful chemicals was significantly reduced. In some cases, the reductions were the same as those in smokers who quit altogether. These data suggest the potential of glo as a reduced-risk product. glo is a tobacco heating product designed to heat rather than burn tobacco. Tests show that glo vapour has around 90-95 percent less toxicants than smoke. (2018-02-24)

Study finds direct evidence of exposure of pregnant women to herbicide ingredient
The first birth cohort study of its kind has found more than 90 percent of a group of pregnant women in Central Indiana had detectable levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, the most heavily used herbicide worldwide. (2018-03-22)

Research connects first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease
Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease. In a paper published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers announce a persistent decline in kidney functioning following an individual's first case of kidney stones. (2016-11-02)

New urine test can quickly detect whether a person has a healthy diet
Scientists have developed a urine test that measures the health of a person's diet. The five-minute test measures biological markers in urine created by the breakdown of foods such as red meat, chicken, fish and fruit and vegetables. (2017-01-12)

Rewards treat alcohol abuse in those with mental illness
Researchers at Washington State University have shown that offering prizes- - from simple shampoo to DVD players -- can be an effective, low-cost treatment for alcohol abuse, the nation's third leading preventable cause of death. (2017-02-07)

Dye kills malaria parasites at speed not seen before
Research shows that the dye methylene blue is a safe antimalarial that kills malaria parasites at an unprecedented rate. Within two days, patients are cured of the disease and no longer transmit the parasite if they are bitten again by a mosquito. This discovery was made by Radboud university medical center scientists and international colleagues during a research project conducted in Mali. The results will be published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases on Feb. 6. (2018-02-05)

Antibiotic resistance increases relapse in urinary tract infections
Patients with a certain drug-resistant urinary tract infection were more likely to have a relapse of their infection within a week than those with non-resistant infections and were more likely to be prescribed an incorrect antibiotic according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2018-10-30)

Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma
When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, pathologists say. (2018-07-13)

Without 46 million year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armor
Socially transmitted, nitrogen-providing microbes have opened a new ecological frontier for herbivorous turtle ants. (2018-03-06)

Supplements don't preserve kidney health in Type 2 diabetes
Supplements of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (often sold as fish oil) do not help people with type 2 diabetes stave off chronic kidney disease, according to findings from the largest clinical study to date of the supplements in this patient population. The study's primary authors are Dr. Ian de Boer at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Dr. JoAnn Manson at Harvard Medical School. (2019-11-08)

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