Popular Urologists News and Current Events

Popular Urologists News and Current Events, Urologists News Articles.
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For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress -- and vice versa
A new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. Interestingly, the reverse was also true as experiencing more distress led to worse function. The likelihood of this reciprocal relationship highlights the importance of greater investment in psychosocial care to mitigate treatment side effects in prostate cancer survivors. (2018-05-31)

Use of Prostate Health Index test reduces unnecessary biopsies
The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a cost-effective tool used by urologists to detect prostate cancer. It reduces the risk of over diagnosis, and cuts down on the need to send men for unnecessary and often uncomfortable biopsies. So says Jay White of Carolina Urology Partners in the US, lead author of a study in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, published by Springer Nature. (2017-11-20)

ASCO and Cancer Care Ontario update guideline on radiation therapy for prostate cancer
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario today issued a joint clinical practice guideline update on brachytherapy (internal radiation) for patients with prostate cancer. The update provides evidence-based recommendations for different patient risk groups, and specifies the most effective forms of brachytherapy. (2017-03-28)

New method to detect ultrasound with light
A tiny, transparent device that fits into a contact lens can determine the speed of blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate at the back of the eye, helping to diagnose diseases such as macular degeneration. (2017-02-13)

Prostate problems also associated with sleep disorders and depression
Men who suffer from urological problems such as erectile dysfunction, urinary tract and bladder problems or infertility issues often also suffer from depression and sleep disorders. Physicians should therefore be aware of these risks so that they can refer their patients to relevant specialists and provide comprehensive and timely care of male patients. This is according to Arman Walia of the University of California Irvine in the US, in a study in the Springer Nature-branded IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal. (2018-08-31)

Clinical guidelines from specialty societies often biased
Clinical practice guidelines issued by specialty societies in North America often recommend health care services linked to their specialties, in contrast with European guidelines and those from independent organizations, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-03-18)

Many new doctors may be posting unprofessional content on Facebook
When researchers searched Facebook for the public accounts of all urologists who graduated from US residency programs in 2015, they found that a substantial proportion of these accounts contained self-authored unprofessional content based on the professionalism guidelines of three physicians' organizations. (2017-04-10)

Research Brief: Older adults often prescribed meds linked to higher side effect risks
Drugs with high-risk anticholinergic properties can lead to risks of developing serious adverse events, such as cognitive impairment, falls, dementia, and even mortality in older adults. Yet, relatively little is known about prescribing trends of high-risk anticholinergic medications in the United States of America. Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy conducted a repeated cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to understand more. (2018-03-27)

Robotic surgery as effective as open surgery for bladder cancer
Robotic surgery is as effective as traditional open surgery in treating bladder cancer, according to a landmark study published in the journal Lancet. Three Loyola Medicine urologists are co-authors of the study. (2018-07-11)

Blocking protein kills prostate cancer cells, inhibits tumor growth, Jefferson scientists find
Researchers at Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia have shown that they can effectively kill prostate cancer cells in both the laboratory and in experimental animal models by blocking a signaling protein that is key to the cancer's growth. The work proves that the protein, Stat5, is both vital to prostate cancer cell maintenance and that it is a viable target for drug therapy. (2008-02-28)

Study: Long-term testosterone therapy improves urinary, sexual function and quality of life
A new study shows a significant improvement in both sexual and urinary function as well as quality of life for hypogonadal men who undergo long-term testosterone replacement therapy. (2017-08-15)

Biomarker could lead to personalized therapies for prostate cancer
In 2016, more than 181,000 new cases of prostate cancer were reported in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. Multiple factors have resulted in the rise of diagnoses, but a number of high-grade tumors remain underdiagnosed and undertreated. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have explored how a specific gene/protein status may allow clinicians to better identify prostate cancer progression while helping them to make rational decisions in treating the disease. (2017-04-05)

Study examines relationship between social disparities and benign prostatic hyperplasia
In an Andrologia study of 100,000 men in Korea, social disparities -- such as low education level and low household income, current or previous use of medical aid health insurance, blue-collar employment or unemployment, divorce, and low social capital of communities -- were all linked with a higher prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that is characterized by an enlarged prostate due to aging, lower urinary tract blockage, and other factors. (2018-08-22)

New effects of ketamine abuse uncovered
Research conducted by scientists at the University of York has revealed how recreational ketamine abuse damages the bladder. (2016-03-18)

Is there an association between number of patients doctor sees and online patient rating?
Lower online patient ratings for urologists in California were associated with practices that saw more patients. (2018-03-21)

North York General study shows safest method for prostate cancer biopsies
Only one percent of testing for prostate cancer in North America is done using TPBx. North York General Hospital has shown this to be the safest method and can be performed under local anesthetic. (2019-05-09)

New system proposed for logging physician experience in robotic surgeries
Loyola Medicine physicians have proposed a simple new system to improve the reporting of robotic surgeries performed by surgeons in training. The system, called RoboLog, was successfully piloted on 310 urologic robotic surgeries, according to a study published in the Journal of Surgical Education. (2017-09-26)

Hormonal treatment may trigger depression in men with prostate cancer
Men who receive anti-hormonal treatment after having their prostate removed are 80 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men who don't receive this treatment. This leads researchers to suggest that patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for post-surgical depression. This is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona. (2019-03-17)

Antibiotic overuse is high for common urology procedures
A new study suggests that antibiotics are being overused in up to 60 percent of patients undergoing common urological procedures. The study, led by Daniel Livorsi, M.D., University of Iowa assistant professor of internal medicine, shows that the high rates of overuse were mostly due to extended use of antibiotics following the procedure. The findings were published Dec. 21 in JAMA Network Open. (2018-12-21)

Drinking diet soda may reduce the risk of forming kidney stones
Patients with stone disease could benefit from drinking diet soda. New research from the University of California, San Francisco suggests that the citrate and malate content in commonly consumed sodas may be sufficient to inhibit the development of calcium stones. The study was presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. (2009-04-26)

Noninvasive imaging test shown accurate in ruling out kidney cancers
The latest in a series of studies led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine shows that addition of a widely available, noninvasive imaging test called 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT/CT to CT or MRI increases the accuracy of kidney tumor classification. The research team reports that the potential improvement in diagnostic accuracy will spare thousands of patients each year in the United States alone from having to undergo unnecessary surgery. (2017-04-19)

Robotic surgery in the COVID-19 era: Urologists take on the challenges
Robotic surgery plays a major role in modern management of prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and other conditions treated by urologists. But it also poses some special challenges as hospitals resume elective surgery amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Problems and solutions facing urologic robotic surgery in the era of COVID-19 are reviewed in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-10-06)

Mail-in sperm testing system just as reliable in predicting male fertility as tests performed in clinic settings
Keck Medicine of USC study shows that semen can accurately be tested up to 52 hours after being collected, offering men greater flexibility in how they provide sperm specimens (2021-02-11)

Researchers look for causes of unexpected early bladder cancer recurrence after laparoscopic surgery
Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology, a team of researchers found that about 5 percent of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. Their results are reported in The Journal of Urology®. (2016-04-26)

New topical spray may treat premature ejaculation
PSD502, a new topical spray, is a safe and effective treatment for premature ejaculation. Researchers presented data on the spray's efficacy during a presentation of their randomized, Phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled study at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. (2009-04-26)

Fistula-related morbidity decreased by prompt treatment in Sierra Leone
Extent of fibrosis is the most profound factor in predicting surgical outcomes of genitourinary fistula repair, suggesting that prompt treatment could significantly improve survival. Researchers in Nashville review experiences at two centers in Sierra Leone to assess factors predictive of successful fistula repair. Their findings were presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. (2009-04-26)

Uterus sparing surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pelvic organ prolapse
Researchers presented data at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association showing that uterus sparing surgery is an effective and safe treatment for women who want to preserve the integrity of vaginal function after pelvic organ prolapse. Hysterectomy may not be the only option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. (2009-04-26)

Adult circumcision reduces risk of HIV transmission without reducing sexual pleasure
Two studies presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association show that adult circumcision reduces the risk of contracting the human immunodeficiency virus and the risk of coital injury -- without reducing pleasure or causing sexual dysfunction. (2009-04-26)

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic surgery reduces risk of blood loss
In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found. (2016-05-20)

Survey reveals low levels of awareness in men about prostate health and function
Awareness of prostate health is alarmingly low in men over 50, a new survey commissioned by the European Association of Urology (EAU) has revealed, despite the fact that at the age of 60 and over, 40 percent of men suffer from an enlarged prostate. (2019-09-24)

Female urologists still earn less money than their male counterparts
Although the field of urology remains largely male dominated, the proportion of female physicians specializing in urology has increased from less than 0.5percent in 1981 to 10 percent today, and 33 percent of students entering urology internships and residency programs are now female. Researchers report in The Journal of Urology that gender inequality between male and female urologists persists with women currently earning approximately $76,000 less than men annually. (2016-01-05)

Urologist plays key role in determining use of hormone therapy in prostate cancer
The urologist a patient sees may be a more important factor than the tumor characteristics or the patient's other characteristics in determining the use of hormonal therapy for prostate cancer, a new study reports in the June 21 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2006-06-20)

Men treated for localized prostate cancer could benefit from pomegranate juice consumption
Pomegranate juice may slow the progression of post-treatment prostate cancer recurrence, according to new long-term research results being presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association. Researchers found that men who have undergone treatment for localized prostate cancer could benefit from drinking pomegranate juice. (2009-04-26)

UF urologists use robot to shave time off vasectomy reversal
In a comparison of robot-assisted vasectomy reversal and the microscope procedure that is widely used, scientists found robot-assisted surgery could reduce average surgery time by about 20 minutes. Despite the study's small sample size -- 27 patients -- physicians say it is promising, and requires more evaluation and longer follow-up of patients to yield more widely applicable results. (2010-01-07)

Satisfaction and regret after radical prostatectomy procedures studied
Studies have shown that approximately 16 percent of patients with localized prostate cancer regret their treatment choice. (2008-08-26)

Miriam first in New England to do completely laparoscopic robotic-assisted surgery for bladder cancer
The Minimally Invasive Urology Institute at the Miriam Hospital is now performing a completely laparoscopic surgery for the treatment of bladder cancer. (2016-10-12)

Sex development center stage in special journal issue
Naveen Uli, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and Michiko Watanabe, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine served as editors for the special issue of Birth Defects Research Part C: Embryo Today. (2017-02-01)

The gender divide in urology: Surgeon gender shapes the clinical landscape
Although female certified urologists are still a minority within the specialty, they perform many more procedures on women than their male colleagues, who perform more procedures on men than their female colleagues. As more women opt to specialize in urology, attention needs to be paid to the way gender shapes the clinical landscape, report researchers in The Journal of Urology. (2016-08-17)

Young single men are more likely to bank sperm before testicular cancer treatment
A quarter of men with testicular cancer banked their sperm before treatment, but only six percent of those used the sperm to father a child. Men who banked their sperm averaged 26 -- 10 years younger than those who didn't -- and were more than twice as likely to be single. As most men treated for testicular cancer are young, and survival rates exceed 90 percent, post-treatment fertility is an important issue, say researchers. (2007-01-08)

Beaumont holds first international congress on underactive bladder
Beaumont Health System urologists hope to heighten awareness of underactive bladder, or UAB, through an international forum funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The Feb. 20-21 Congress of Urologic Research and Education on Aging Underactive Bladder, or CURE-UAB, in Bethesda, Md., is attracting physicians, researchers and nurses from around the world for scientific discussion and interdisciplinary collaboration. (2014-02-19)

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