Popular Vaccines News and Current Events

Popular Vaccines News and Current Events, Vaccines News Articles.
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Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (2019-02-06)

Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine
New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts. (2019-05-22)

Discovering the early age immune response in foals
Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals, a finding described in the May 16 issue of PLOS ONE. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules, said Dr. Julia Felippe, associate professor of large animal medicine, and research associate Rebecca Tallmadge. (2017-06-29)

Novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells
A novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. (2018-05-01)

Advanced genetic screening method may speed vaccine development
Vaccines remain the best line of defense against deadly pathogens and now Kathryn Sykes and Stephen Johnston, researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, along with co-author Michael McGuire from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are using clever functional screening methods to attempt to speed new vaccines into production that are both safer and more potent. (2012-05-09)

Annual influenza vaccination does not prevent natural immunity
Earlier studies have suggested that having repeated annual influenza vaccination can prevent natural immunity to the virus, and potentially increase the susceptibility to influenza illness in the event of a pandemic, or when the vaccine does not 'match' the virus circulating in the community. But now, researchers at the Influenza Center in Bergen have published a study, which concludes that annual influenza vaccination does not increase susceptibility to influenza infection in years of vaccine mismatch. (2017-11-13)

Predicting evolution
A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast. The approach has implications for the prediction of dominant viral strains. (2019-11-13)

Yale researchers identify target for novel malaria vaccine
A Yale-led team of researchers have created a vaccine that protects against malaria infection in mouse models, paving the way for the development of a human vaccine that works by targeting the specific protein that parasites use to evade the immune system. The study was published by Nature Communications. (2018-07-13)

Horses get the flu, too
Flu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential to act as 'mixing vessels,' generating new strains that could infect people. (2018-04-30)

Ebola vaccines provide immune responses after 1 year
Immune responses to Ebola vaccines at one year after vaccination are examined in a new study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA. (2017-03-14)

New finding will help target MS immune response
Researchers have made another important step in the progress towards being able to block the development of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. (2015-10-29)

Boosting immune cell memory to improve vaccines and cancer immunotherapy
In mouse experiments, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that drugs that activate the cells' proteasome, or recycling center, tip the balance in favor of memory CD8+ T cells. This approach could be used to improve how well vaccines and immunotherapies work and how long they last. (2017-08-28)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)

Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines. This approach opens the possibility to engineer safer and more effective vaccines. (2020-05-14)

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures. (2018-01-19)

Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza a viruses, study finds
Researchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-24)

Influenza vaccine delays are a problem for pediatricians
Uptake of influenza vaccine among children is low compared to other childhood vaccines, and missed opportunities for vaccination play an important role in this low uptake. Problems with receiving influenza vaccine in a timely manner within pediatric practices are an important cause of missed opportunities, but little is known about pediatricians' experiences and practices related to influenza vaccine delivery delays. (2018-05-05)

LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. (2019-01-25)

Nano vaccine for hepatitis B shows promise for third world
A new needle-less vaccine is highly effective and can be stored without refrigeration, University of Michigan studies in animals show. The vaccine should also be safer to administer than existing hepatitis B vaccines and effective with only two immunizations. The technique, a nanoemulsion given in the nose, is a step closer to human trials, possibly within a year. Hepatitis B kills an estimated 1 million people annually. (2008-08-12)

UC Davis researchers find quiet viruses alter body's response to vaccines, pathogens
UC Davis researchers have shown that low levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV) have a significant impact on microbe and immune cell populations and how the immune system responds to the influenza vaccine. The study was published in the Journal of Virology. (2018-08-03)

Researchers develop a novel RNA-based therapy to target West Nile virus
A Yale-led research team developed a new RNA therapy, delivered through the nose, to treat mice infected with West Nile Virus. The innovative approach reduced the virus in the brain, allowing the immune system to destroy the virus and develop long-term protection against West Nile Virus disease, the researchers said. (2018-03-29)

Study explores new strategy to develop a malaria vaccine
A serum developed by Yale researchers reduces infection from malaria in mice, according to a new study. It works by attacking a protein in the saliva of the mosquitoes infected with the malaria parasite rather than the parasite itself. If the novel approach proves effective in further studies, it could potentially be used to enhance existing malaria vaccines, the researchers said. (2018-04-11)

Many Americans say infectious and emerging diseases in other countries will threaten the US
An overwhelming majority of Americans (95%) think infectious and emerging diseases facing other countries will pose a 'major' or 'minor' threat to the U.S. in the next few years, but more than half (61%) say they are confident the federal government can prevent a major infectious disease outbreak in the US, according to a new national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America and the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-05-21)

Frog slime kills flu virus
Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. (2017-04-18)

A new protocol for Hepatitis A vaccination to prevent a vaccine-resistant virus
Researchers of the University of Barcelona (UB) have analysed, with massive sequencing techniques for the first time, the evolution of the Hepatitis A virus with samples from patients. The results, published in the journal EBioMedicine, show the presence of variants of the virus that could escape the effects of the vaccine. (2019-02-08)

A mass dog vaccination campaign stops rabies transmission in its tracks
Mass dog vaccination campaigns in an African city successfully interrupted rabies transmission for nine months during 2014, researchers report. (2017-12-20)

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now, as reported in Nature Microbiology, researchers at NIAID have developed a new animal model to study the disease. (2018-04-09)

Enhanced therapeutic vaccine platform achieves 2 proof-of-concepts in veterinary medical use
Chronical allergic diseases of dogs and horses can now be treated with an innovative vaccine. It was developed by an international research team led by he University of Bern and in cooperation with the University of Zurich, together with private enterprise companies. The findings obtained in horses and dogs could lead to similar therapeutic vaccines for humans. (2018-04-04)

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic
New data analysis suggests that people born at the time of the 1957 H2N2 or Asian Flu pandemic were at a higher risk of dying during the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic as well as the resurgent H1N1 outbreak in 2013-2014. And it is not the first time this has happened. (2018-01-16)

Does an 'echo chamber' of information impede flu vaccination for children?
Nearly a third of parents say they are not planning to get their child the vaccine this year, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan. (2018-11-19)

Development of vaccines from AIDS to Zika, using a novel 'plug and play' viral platform
Researchers from GeoVax have developed a flexible 'Plug and Play' technology platform that delivers single-dose vaccines that fully protect against emerging infectious diseases such as Zika, Lassa fever, and Ebola. The research will be presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga. (2018-06-10)

Resisting lung cancer recurrence
What if we could prevent cancer recurrence for years after surgery by giving simple recall injections every two or three years? This concept may no longer be a fantasy. In a clinical study published online this week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, a team headed by the international Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research has shown that a vaccine against a protein found in cancer cells produces an immune response that can be boosted and strengthened with additional vaccine shots. (2008-02-04)

Antigen study supports new approach to vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus
Medical researchers have been trying to develop a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) for more than 50 years, without success. New findings by researchers at UC Santa Cruz, however, point to a promising route for designing an effective vaccine. (2018-03-09)

Attacking flu viruses from two sides
UZH researchers have discovered a new way in which certain antibodies interact with the flu virus. This previously unknown form of interaction opens up new possibilities for developing better vaccines and more efficient medication to combat the flu. (2018-04-03)

NIH scientists say advanced vaccines could limit future outbreaks
Novel vaccine technologies are critical to improving the public health response to infectious disease threats that continually emerge and re-emerge, according to scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. In a perspective in The Journal of the American Medical Association, the experts highlight innovations that could significantly shorten the typical decades-long vaccine development timeline. (2018-03-22)

Nebraska virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine
In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant Adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection. (2018-12-20)

Boosting cancer therapy with cross-dressed immune cells
Researchers at EPFL have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors. The study is published in Nature Methods. (2018-01-22)

Multiple research approaches are key to pandemic preparedness, NIAID officials say
Preparedness in the face of major disease outbreaks can save thousands of lives. A new article by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, and colleagues examines the multifaceted nature of effective preparedness and the role that biomedical research plays. Specifically, the article examines three approaches to pandemic preparedness: pathogen-specific work, platform-based technologies, and prototype-pathogen efforts. The article appears online in JAMA. (2017-10-05)

Malaria elimination: Vaccines should be tested on larger groups of volunteers
To find an effective vaccine against malaria it is crucial to test candidate vaccines on larger groups of people than previously thought -- according to a new study published in PLOS Computational Biology. The researchers from Erasmus MC Rotterdam and Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen developed a mathematical model to determine the minimum number of people required for a good vaccine trial. (2017-01-12)

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