Popular Vertebrates News and Current Events

Popular Vertebrates News and Current Events, Vertebrates News Articles.
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New comprehensive study on feeding patterns of tiger mosquitos in Europe
This study, published recently in the international journal Insects, was conducted by researchers from the University of Granada, the Doñana Biological Station, and the Biomedical Research Networking Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) (2021-02-23)

Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) in Italy have succeeded in depleting AND-1, a key protein for DNA replication, by using a recently developed conditional protein degradation system. Consequently, they were able to gain unprecedented access to the mechanism behind how AND-1 works during DNA replication and cell proliferation in vertebrate cells, demonstrating that AND-1 has two different functions during DNA replication mediated by different domains of AND-1. (2018-09-29)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

More squid, less fish: North Pacific seabirds alter their prey preferences
Over the last 125 years, and particularly after an uptick in industrial fishing since 1950, North Pacific seabirds -- typically fish consumers -- have shifted their prey preferences, a new study reports; they are eating lower on the food chain, consuming more squid. (2018-02-14)

Honey samples worldwide test positive for neonicotinoids
A global sampling of honey finds 75 percent to be contaminated with neonicotinoid pesticides. (2017-10-05)

Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea
Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water. (2017-12-06)

Ancient proteins studied in detail
How did protein interactions arise and how have they developed? In a new study, researchers have looked at two proteins which began co-evolving between 400 and 600 million years ago. What did they look like? How did they work, and how have they changed over time? The findings, published in eLife, show how a combination of changes in the proteins' properties created better conditions for the regulation of a cellular process. (2017-05-08)

Wildlife researchers identify impacts of contamination in amphibians
Researchers from different insititutions working together at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and in the field have demonstrated that amphibians are exposed to contaminants through maternal transfer, as has been proven for other vertebrates. (2006-02-21)

Running away from carbon dioxide: The terminal connection
Like us, fish need oxygen, and swimming through a patch of carbon dioxide turns out not to be a pleasant experience. Instead, they prefer to avoid carbon dioxide altogether. In experiments published in Cell Reports on Jan. 30, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a neuronal pathway that makes this behavior possible. (2018-01-30)

Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth. Head of The University of Queensland's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences and co-author Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the fossil unexpectedly provided the first evidence for live birth in an animal group previously thought to exclusively lay eggs. (2017-02-14)

Inflammation in regeneration: A friend or foe?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a novel mechanism linking inflammation and organ regeneration in fish, which can be conserved among vertebrates. (2017-03-06)

The proteins that domesticated our genomes
EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease. (2017-03-08)

Scientists found a new genus and species of frogs
A team of scientists from MSU and their foreign colleagues discovered a previously unknown species and genus of batrachians Siamophryne troglodytes. These frogs live in the only one place on Earth -- a limestone cave in Thailand. The location of the cave is not disclosed to protect the animals. The results of the study will lead to the reconsideration of evolutionary history of the relevant group of Amphibia and are valuable for systematics and conservation. (2018-03-29)

Growing teeth and a backbone: Studies trace early origins of skeletal tissues
Two new studies on the evolutionary origin of teeth and of vertebra further illuminate the human connection to marine organisms that goes back millions of years. Both studies in the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) are published this week by Andrew Gillis and Katharine Criswell of the University of Cambridge, UK, who conduct research as Whitman Center Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. (2017-11-22)

Watch fat cells help heal a wound in a fly
Fat body cells in Drosophila play a surprising role in sealing wounds and preventing infection, researchers at the University of Bristol report February 26 in the journal Developmental Cell. The cells, which were previously thought to be immobile, propel themselves forward toward wounds with a wormlike wave motion, rather than adhering to and pushing off of other structures like most motile cells do. (2018-02-26)

No sex for all-female fish species
They reproduce through gynogenesis. Their offspring are clones of the mother. According to established theories, the Amazon molly should have become extinct a long time ago. A new study shows how the fish avoids this fate. (2018-02-12)

Invasive species jeopardize already threatened island animals
Researchers have identified which of the approximately 465,000 islands worldwide are home to both highly threatened terrestrial vertebrates and invasive species that may endanger their survival. This distribution map could help conservationists decide how to prioritize prevention, control and eradication. (2017-10-25)

A genetic mutation in the evolution helps to explain the origin of some human organs
A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. This change, a random error in the evolutionary process, facilitated the connection of the gene networks involved in animal embryogenesis. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, was participated in by experts from the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the Department of Genetics from the University of Barcelona Institute of Biomedicine, and the Anton Dohrn Zoological Station in Italy. (2017-12-14)

Ancient southern China fish may have evolved prior to the 'Age of Fish'
An ancient fish species with unusual scales and teeth from the Kuanti Formation in southern China may have evolved prior to the 'Age of Fish', according to a study published March 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Brian Choo from Flinders University, Australia, and colleagues at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, China. (2017-03-08)

Study finds humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birth
Vertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal stress on offspring stress hormone levels using data from all known studies across vertebrates. (2018-04-10)

Sea snakes that can't drink seawater
New research from the University of Florida shows that pelagic sea snakes quench their thirst by drinking freshwater that collects on the surface of the ocean after heavy rainfall. (2019-02-08)

Humans no longer have ancient defence mechanism against viruses
Insects and plants have an important ancient defense mechanism that helps them to fight viruses. This is encoded in their DNA. Scientists have long assumed that vertebrates -- including humans -- also had this same mechanism. But researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have found that vertebrates lost this particular asset in the course of their evolution. (2017-09-15)

Ray-finned fishes: Natural born survivors
Scientists from the University of Bristol have revealed that ray-finned fishes are perhaps one of Earth's most resilient groups of animals, having survived four mass extinction events that wiped out many other groups. (2018-02-05)

Many species now going extinct may vanish without a fossil trace
Scientists struggle to compare the magnitude of Earth's ongoing sixth mass-extinction event with the five great die-offs of prehistory. A new study by three paleontologists shows that the species now perishing may vanish without a permanent trace -- and earlier extinctions may be underestimated as well. (2016-03-21)

Ancient origins of viruses discovered
Research published today in Nature has found that many of the viruses infecting us today have ancient evolutionary histories that date back to the first vertebrates and perhaps the first animals in existence. (2018-04-04)

Plant-eating dinosaur discovered in Antarctica
For the first time, the presence of large bodied herbivorous dinosaurs in Antarctica has been recorded. Until now, remains of sauropoda had been recovered from all continental landmasses, except Antarctica. Dr. Ignacio Alejandro Cerda and his team's identification of the remains of the sauropod dinosaur suggests that advanced titanosaurs achieved a global distribution at least by the Late Cretaceous. Their work has just been published online in Springer's journal, Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature. (2011-12-19)

The origins of Cuban species
An international research team suggests the endangered Cuban solenodon evolved after the extinction of dinosaurs. (2016-08-24)

On the land, one-quarter of vertebrates die because of humans
Humans have a ''disproportionately huge effect'' on the other species of vertebrates that share Earth's surface with us, causing more than 25 percent of the deaths among an array of species all over the globe, according to a recently published study. (2019-02-11)

Two fishes a day keep the mantid coming back to prey: The first fishing praying mantis
For the first time, a praying mantis is recorded to fish. For five days in a row, an adult male was observed hunting and devouring a total of nine guppies from a pond located in a private roof garden in Karnataka, India. Apart from demonstrating such repetitive behaviour, the event is remarkable in the fact that it occurred naturally, without external interference. The phenomenon is described in the open access Journal of Orthoptera Research. (2018-09-20)

Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives
Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University, have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates. (2017-12-04)

Montreal researchers explain how your muscles form
An international team led by Montreal researchers discovers two proteins essential to the development of skeletal muscle. (2018-11-12)

Vocal neurons encode evolution of frog calls
A study of two closely related frog species reveals a population of neurons that give rise to the unique mating calls of each species. Published in JNeurosci, the findings suggest that changes in the properties of these cells over the course of evolution may have shaped vocal patterns in vertebrates including bats and primates. (2018-05-21)

Basis of development of vertebrate limb muscles has been established in cartilaginous fishes
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered that both bony and cartilaginous fish develop their appendages via a shared mechanism -- the mechanism is also observed in land-dwelling vertebrates such as mice. They found the fin muscles of cartilaginous are formed by muscle precursors expressing Lbx1 expression, a gene that coordinates limb-muscle formation. This work revisits some related evolutionary hypotheses using a molecular biology approach and provides new insights. (2017-10-02)

Fish provide insight into the evolution of the immune system
New research reveals how immune systems can evolve resistance to parasites. The study published in Nature Communications, solves the enigma of how species can adapt and change their immune system to cope with new parasitic threats -- whilst at the same time showing little or no evolutionary change in critical immune function over millions of years. It help to explain why we humans have some immune genes that are almost identical to those of chimpanzees. (2017-11-06)

Identical evolution of isolated organisms
Palaeontologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Calgary in Canada have provided new proof of parallel evolution: conodonts, early vertebrates from the Permian period, adapted to new habitats in almost identical ways despite living in different geographical regions. The researchers were able to prove that this was the case using fossil teeth found in different geographical locations. (2020-11-23)

Novel gene in red blood cells may help adult newts regenerate limbs
Adult newts can repeatedly regenerate body parts. Researchers from Japan, including the University of Tsukuba, and the University of Daytona, have identified Newtic1, a gene that is expressed in clumps of red blood cells in the circulating blood. These clumps are also newly generated in the stump region of amputated limbs of the adult newt. The study suggests, for the first time, an oxygen-independent delivery role for red blood cells in non-mammalian vertebrates. (2018-06-04)

Birds help each other partly for selfish reasons
Up to now, researchers have believed that birds stay at home and altruistically help raise younger siblings because this is the only way to pass on genes when you cannot breed yourself. But this idea is only partially true. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that birds benefit from being helpful because it also increases their chances of reproducing in the future. (2018-09-10)

Extinct monitor lizard had four eyes, fossil evidence shows
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 2 have evidence that an extinct species of monitor lizard had four eyes, a first among known jawed vertebrates. Today, only the jawless lampreys have four eyes. (2018-04-02)

New catalysts mimic human vision
Light sensitive molecules trigger vision inside our retinas. This phenomenon inspired ICIQ researchers to create a new family of eco-friendly catalysts activated by purple LEDs for unprecedented transformations. (2017-03-20)

Birds migrate away from diseases
In a unique study, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young -- as moving away from diseases in the tropics enables them to survive with a less costly immune system. (2018-04-10)

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