Popular Viability News and Current Events

Popular Viability News and Current Events, Viability News Articles.
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New technique to aid IVF embryo selection
Australian researchers have successfully developed an advanced new imaging technique, which can help assess the quality of early-stage embryos. (2017-08-28)

New method increases life span of donated brain tissue
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that enables them to use donated brain tissue from people with epilepsy for 48 hours. Previously, the researchers only had 12 hours to test new treatments before the structure of the cells started to break down. The research has now been published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-09)

The sixth Ttaste?
UCSB biologists enhance the scientific understanding of calcium taste (2018-01-03)

Increased scientific rigor will improve wildlife research and management
Wildlife management relies on rigorous science that produces reliable knowledge because it increases accurate understanding of the natural world and informs management decisions. (2018-01-18)

A new tool for improving uterine transplant surgery
Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of an article in Future Science OA demonstrating the first use of multispectral imaging in gynecology, in a uterine transplant setting. (2018-02-12)

Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas
The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Biology. (2018-12-27)

Roles and functions of community health workers in primary care
Community health workers in primary care provide clinical services, community resource connections, and health education and coaching. As trained individuals with limited or no formal medical education, they are widely considered to have the potential to enhance primary care access and quality, but remain underutilized. (2018-05-14)

Augmented reality system lets doctors see under patients' skin without the scalpel
New technology is bringing the power of augmented reality into clinical practice. The system, called ProjectDR, allows medical images such as CT scans and MRI data to be displayed directly on a patient's body in a way that moves as the patient does. (2018-01-24)

New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies
A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. Previous culture systems maintained functional heart slices for no more than 24 hours. The extended viability time will enable improved preclinical testing of drugs and gene therapies for effectiveness and toxicity. (2019-07-25)

Rare coastal martens under high risk of extinction in coming decades
The coastal marten, a small but fierce forest predator, is at a high risk for extinction in Oregon and northern California in the next 30 years due to threats from human activities. (2018-04-04)

Supplement for pregnant women with malaria could improve birth outcomes
Pregnant women infected with malaria have lower levels of an essential amino acid called L-arginine, which may help to explain why these women are more likely to experience complications such as stillbirths and low birth weight infants. (2018-03-07)

Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney function
A new optical spectroscopy technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week in the Journal of Biomedical Optics. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. (2017-05-04)

Renoprotective effects of sglt2 inhibitors: Beyond glucose reabsorption inhibition
In this manuscript we summarize the available data on the mechanisms that underlie the renoprotective properties of SGLT2 inhibitors. Apart from their beneficial effects on carbohydrate and uric acid metabolism and their blood pressure-lowering properties, the most important mechanism that can explain the reduction in albuminuria and the preservation of renal function that follows their administration is the reduction in intraglomerular pressure. (2017-01-20)

Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. In a report in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators describe how this protein accumulation results in 'ER stress' and initiates a host of pathologic changes. These findings may open up new ways to treat PSACH and other ER-stress-related conditions. (2018-12-12)

What makes the bacteria behind lyme disease tick?
The precise mechanisms of how humans become infected with Lyme disease are still unclear. Researchers from UConn Health are advancing the understanding of how the causative bacterial agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), survives in ticks and mammals. (2018-02-08)

UMass Amherst environmental chemist flashes warning light on new nanoparticle
The UMass Amherst and Chinese research team found that layered BP's cytotoxicity is based on the fact that it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are among the most potent cell-damaging agents known. Layered BP also disrupts cell membrane integrity in a particle-size-dependent manner. (2017-08-30)

Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
In a new study, Northwestern University researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium. (2019-04-18)

Researchers take important step toward gonorrhea vaccine
Researchers are paving the way toward a new therapeutic approach for gonorrhea by shedding light on the mechanism behind important proteins on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria's outer membrane. (2018-02-05)

Lake Erie algal blooms 'seeded' internally by overwintering cells in lake-bottom sediments
Western Lake Erie's annual summer algal blooms are triggered, at least in part, by cyanobacteria cells that survive the winter in lake-bottom sediments, then emerge in the spring to 'seed' the next year's bloom, according to a research team led by University of Michigan scientists. (2018-11-21)

$1.2M USDA grant to study Northeast organic farming
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Initiative for Future Agriculture and Food Systems has awarded a $1.2 million grant for the creation of a new organic farming network managed by Cornell University's Department of Horticulture. (2001-12-07)

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric
A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics. (2017-12-07)

Shoulder injuries in professional baseball players: A continuing puzzle
Professional baseball players struggle to return to a high level of play after biceps tenodesis (BP) surgery, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Diego. The study examined how players with SLAP tears responded to biceps tenodesis. (2017-03-18)

BAT's novel vaping product shows minimal toxicity in laboratory tests
A series of in vitro toxicology tests provide evidence that British American Tobacco's novel vaping product produces greatly reduced mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and effects on wound healing as compared to cigarette smoke. (2019-03-12)

Chimera viruses can help the fight against lymphomas
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have created a chimera virus that allows the study of molecules to treat cancers caused by human herpes virus infection in mice models of disease. (2017-09-14)

Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019
Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-09-30)

Pregnancy loss and the evolution of sex are linked by cellular line dance
In new research published this week (Aug. 1, 2017) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Levitis and his collaborators report that meiosis takes a heavy toll on the viability of offspring. And not just for humans. Creatures from geckos to garlic and cactuses to cockroaches pay a price to undergo sexual reproduction. (2017-08-01)

Researchers provide potential explanation for declines in brown bear populations
Animals may fall into what are called evolutionary and ecological traps when they make poor decisions using seemingly reliable environmental cues. (2018-04-05)

Not all stem cells are equally efficient for use in regenerative medicine
Scientists at the University of Granada and Alcala de Henares University have concluded that, contrary to what was thought, only a specific group of cord blood stem cells maintained in culture are useful for therapeutic purposes. (2013-01-09)

Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West
New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West - affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering. (2019-03-18)

The worm that turned on heavy metal
Researchers in South America have studied the viability of using earthworms to process hazardous material containing high concentrations of heavy metal for the bioremediation of old industrial sites, landfill and other potentially hazardous areas. They provide details of a possible approach in the International Journal of Global Environmental Issues this month. (2010-12-06)

Mining and energy ministers to meet
On September 19 and 20, 2005, federal, provincial and territorial ministers will gather for the 2005 Energy and Mines Ministers' Conference. (2005-09-19)

A new therapy proves effective against brain metastasis
A study published in Nature Medicine by a team led by Manuel Valiente, head of the Brain Metastasis Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), shows that the administration of silibinin in patients with brain metastasis reduces lesions without causing any adverse effects. This preliminary trial provides proof of concept that this compound could be a new effective and safe alternative to treat brain metastasis. (2018-06-11)

Novel material with strong action against fungi and tumors was developed
Researchers have created a composite with antifungal properties that are 32 times greater than those of silver by irradiating a metallic tungstate with electrons and femtosecond laser. (2019-10-02)

How viable is your liver after you die?
In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics. The results of this study could reduce the number of livers that are discarded and facilitate development of novel therapeutics and bioengineering for clinical research applications. (2019-05-13)

How Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes death in macrophages
The bacteria that cause the devastating disease tuberculosis have the ability to escape destruction and grow after they are engulfed by lung macrophages, the immune cells that are supposed to destroy pathogens. Now researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have described key biochemical steps between the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage responsible for that ability. (2018-07-10)

New data unearths pesticide peril in beehives
Honeybees -- employed to pollinate crops during the blooming season -- encounter danger due to lingering and wandering pesticides, according to a new Cornell University study that analyzed the bee's own food. (2017-04-20)

New definition returns meaning to information
Identifying meaningful information is a key challenge to disciplines from biology to artificial intelligence. In a new paper, Santa Fe Institute researchers propose a broadly applicable, fully formal definition for this kind of semantic information. (2018-10-22)

A fast cell sorter shrinks to cell phone size
Commercially available cell sorters can rapidly and accurately aid medical diagnosis and biological research, but they are large and expensive, present a biohazard and may damage cells. Now a team of researchers has developed a cell sorter based on acoustic waves that can compete with existing fluorescence-activated cell sorters and is an inexpensive lab on a chip. (2015-09-22)

Recent progress in tracking the viability of transplanted stem cells in vivo
The viability of the transplanted stem cells is particularly crucial in determining the success of stem cell-based regenerative medicine. Therefore, the development of non-invasive imaging methods that can in situ monitor the viability of the transplanted stem cells is urgently needed. Now, researchers in Su'zhou summarize the recent progress in tracking the viability of the transplanted stem cells in vivo, including reporter-gene based methods, exogenous contrast label-based methods and multimodel imaging methods. (2016-05-24)

SwRI scientists dig into the origin of organics on Ceres
Since NASA's Dawn spacecraft detected localized organic-rich material on Ceres, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has been digging into the data to explore different scenarios for its origin. After considering the viability of comet or asteroid delivery, the preponderance of evidence suggests the organics are most likely native to Ceres. (2017-10-18)

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